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Thread: The longest lived animals

  1. #1

    The longest lived animals

    This is from http://mistupid.com/facts/page018.htm but I have reordered the lines so that the longest lived animals are on top.


    • Giant tortoises live to be 200 years old.
    • An average parrot lives for 120 years.
    • The longest-lived insects are queen termites, which live for up to 100 years.
    • A shark lives for about 100 years.
    • An average elephant lives for about 55 years.
    • The oldest known goldfish lived to 41 years of age.
    • A gorilla lives to about 40 years of age.
    • Eagles live for about 40 years.
    • An average lion lives for 25 years.
    • Dolphins live for about 25 years.
    • Rattlesnakes live for about 19 years.
    • Ants may live up to 16 years.
    • A queen honeybee lives for about 7 years.
    • A butterfly lives for about 6 months.

  2. #2
    Makes you wonder if longevity of life span is atributed more twords genetics or place of environment. I'm sure there has been many studies on the subject.
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  3. #3
    And the clam:
    Scientists said the ocean quahog clam was aged between 405 and 410 years and could offer insights into the secrets of longevity.
    Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7066389.stm

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by cvelusc
    And the smartest creature in the ocean is octopus and they usually die within a year. Why?

    Wise.

  5. #5
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    Worlds oldest animal aged to 4000 years.
    Texas A&M University researcher Brendan Roark announced last week at American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) that age and growth studies of deep-sea gold corals (Geradia sp.) and black corals (Leiopathes glaberrima, pictured left) indicate these animals live between two and four millennia, repectively.
    http://scienceblogs.com/deepseanews/..._aged_to_4.php

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    And the smartest creature in the ocean is octopus and they usually die within a year. Why?
    Possibly a function of reproduction? Once an organism reproduces there's really no point for further existence. The organism ages, becomes more susceptible to disease, and should make way for the younger (and healthier) generation to continue the species. So possibly the clam doesn't reach maturation until later in life or reproduction cycles are so far apart that the increased age is necessary.

    As a side note I saw a very sad thing yesterday at the park. Some sort of duck had a horrible limp that made it appear incredibly vulnerable. I don't know how well the duck could propel itself in the water, but if the limp isn't resolved, I can't imagine it living much longer.

    Unless it was all a rouse to get sympathy from us humans passing by and thus an easy handout

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvelusc
    As a side note I saw a very sad thing yesterday at the park. Some sort of duck had a horrible limp that made it appear incredibly vulnerable. I don't know how well the duck could propel itself in the water, but if the limp isn't resolved, I can't imagine it living much longer.

    Unless it was all a rouse to get sympathy from us humans passing by and thus an easy handout
    A lame duck, huh? It's name wouldn't happen to be George, would it?

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    And to think that Spruce trees are older than god him/herself, or at least Bel, one of the first gods...

    The world's oldest recorded tree is a 9,550 year old spruce in the Dalarna province of Sweden

    The world’s oldest recorded tree is a 9,550 year old spruce in the Dalarna province of Sweden.

    The spruce tree has shown to be a tenacious survivor that has endured by growing between erect trees and smaller bushes in pace with the dramatic climate changes over time.

    For many years the spruce tree has been regarded as a relative newcomer in the Swedish mountain region.
    ”Our results have shown the complete opposite, that the spruce is one of the oldest known trees in the mountain range,” says Leif Kullman, Professor of Physical Geography at Umeå University.

    A fascinating discovery was made under the crown of a spruce in Fulu Mountain in Dalarna. Scientists found four “generations” of spruce remains in the form of cones and wood produced from the highest grounds.

    The discovery showed trees of 375, 5,660, 9,000 and 9,550 years old and everything displayed clear signs that they have the same genetic makeup as the trees above them. Since spruce trees can multiply with root penetrating braches, they can produce exact copies, or clones.

    The tree now growing above the finding place and the wood pieces dating 9,550 years have the same genetic material. The actual has been tested by carbon-14 dating at a laboratory in Miami, Florida, USA.
    Previously, pine trees in North America have been cited as the oldest at 4,000 to 5,000 years old.

    cont

    --

    That is amazing. But it's not clear at least to me if the 9550 old tree is an actual living tree, or the 9550 year old number is referring to the remnants and cones and such, of a tree cloned from a tree cloned from a tree and on and ond and on, back 9550 years ago.
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by ala
    A lame duck, huh? It's name wouldn't happen to be George, would it?
    I didn't see Cheney anywhere so who knows... I wonder if there were Secret Service Mallards in the tree line protecting "George the lame duck"?
    Last edited by cvelusc; 05-04-2008 at 07:41 AM.

  10. #10
    In a supported (domesticated) environment, a lame duck could live a long time. My sister raised ducks for a number of years, and one year a fox got into the duck house and killed and maimed a lot of ducklings. One of the survivors lost a leg in the attack, but lived another 6 years. It was named Tripod. With a little ramp (a piece of wood) my sister put into the pond, it got in and out of the pond, learned to swim (without going in circles) and hopped around the duck yard with the other ducks. I teased my sister about running a little ducky rehab center (and she is not a health care professional)!

    I agree though that a wild duck would be unlikely to survive long with damage to either a wing or a leg.

    (KLD)

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