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Thread: Anyone a Remote Control (RC) fan?

  1. #1

    Anyone a Remote Control (RC) fan?

    One of these days I'm going to buy an electric airplane as I've always enjoyed building and flying. I found this video about someone that built an A10: http://gizmodo.com/384601/a10-rc-mod...t-top-gun-2008

    I'm more interested in acrobatic planes, but the A10 is at the very least quite an engineering feat. The talent of some people is amazing.


    Source: http://www.popsci.com/military-aviat...08-04/wing-men

  2. #2
    Senior Member JeffH's Avatar
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    Electrics

    The current crop of electric motors and li-po batteries make it really simple to get into.

    I have six planes that are ready to fly, another nearly finished and another kit in a box.

    All the info that you'd ever want can be found at:
    http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/index.php
    Jeff
    Doh!

  3. #3
    I flew RC airplanes when I was a kid. I know the electrics are so convenient now but I'd miss the smell of alcohol + castor + nitro that comes with the old two-stroke gas engines. I have an AWARF and an old K&B .45 ready to go, just need a new radio. I've been wanting to crash that thing for years! Maybe now that the boys are old enough to get interested, I'll dig that stuff out.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffH
    I have six planes that are ready to fly, another nearly finished and another kit in a box.
    Any innovative techniques for getting back a plane that has crashed and not easily reached? I'd like to remain as independent as possible and not have to call someone when I manage to crash the plane. Is it possibly a matter of planning? Also, are you by chance affiliated with an RC club where you fly your planes?

  5. #5
    Senior Member JeffH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvelusc
    Any innovative techniques for getting back a plane that has crashed and not easily reached? I'd like to remain as independent as possible and not have to call someone when I manage to crash the plane. Is it possibly a matter of planning? Also, are you by chance affiliated with an RC club where you fly your planes?
    And you will crash it... no big deal though that's part of it.

    Most of my planes are classed as "parkflyers". They're small, lightweight, relatively slow things that can be kept pretty close to you to minimize a possible retrieve.
    I have a foam biplane with a 32" span that wieghs about 7 ounces. It's easy to fly in a ball park. (When the wind is low)
    A nearby sports complex has several fields with paved paths around the fields and I can fly several of my planes there. The electrics are whisper quiet so few people even notice. Mind you, I never fly over or near people but if they're in the next field over it's no big deal.
    I've also flown in large parking lots. You know, off to the edge where few people park. Easy retrieves there.

    I also fly in a large field that has a little used road running through it. It's rough and uneven and I've had some epic retrieves but only needed help once. It's real incentive to learn to fly close and not crash too many times.

    I've been flying RC's for thirty years. All sailplanes when I was AB so I never flew around any clubs. Now I fly local and still don't really need a club.

    But a club may be a good option for you. They are usually full of helpful, enthusiastic folk. And often the clubs have secure, even developed (paved) flight parks that are pretty accessable.
    Unfortunately In my case the club fields are twenty mile drives so I don't bother.

    Another option is indoor flying. Usually a club thing.
    Lighter than parkfyers but just as capable as any size model. Clubs rent basketball courts, indoor areans and the like to fly in.

    You may be interested in '3D' aerobatic flying. The high thust to wieght ratio offered with the electrics allows planes to literally hang and hover off their props. 3D is flown inside and outside.

    Jeff
    Doh!

  6. #6
    Senior Member 6string's Avatar
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    Is that model a Tiger Moth?
    "Music will always find its way to us, with or without business, politics, religion, or any other bullshit attached. Music survives everything, and like God it is always present. It needs no help, and suffers no hindrance. It has always found me, and with God's blessing and permission, it always will." Eric Clapton

  7. #7
    Senior Member JeffH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6string
    Is that model a Tiger Moth?
    Yes, it's a GWS Tiger Moth with an 18 gram Westport rewound CD-rom motor. Flies really sweet.

    Here's a picture of my Guppy. An electric sailplane with a 60" span.
    Doh!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffH
    I also fly in a large field that has a little used road running through it. It's rough and uneven and I've had some epic retrieves but only needed help once. It's real incentive to learn to fly close and not crash too many times.
    Thanks for the info. Definitely a good motivator to not crash and fly close when retrieval is an issue.

    I think I'm going to start out with a small and light plane so that it's relatively easy to fly and rebuild. The little fella is going to get all banged up. I just know it's inevitable.

  9. #9
    flying planes always interested me. maybe this summer i will give it a go. i'll start cheap and small. i did buy 2 racing boats (22") for the pond. we make i course out of milk jugs and race. it's a blast. saw a video where they used the boat to catch a fish. lol
    oh well

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by kenf
    flying planes always interested me. maybe this summer i will give it a go. i'll start cheap and small.
    If by small you mean a small plane, they aren't necessarily cheap and definitely not easier to fly. Try a powered sailplane like the one JeffH shows. They fly slow and easy, and you can get one with rudder/elevator control only, no ailerons.

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