Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Can computers detect beauty?

  1. #1

    Can computers detect beauty?

    Well, one computer programmer claims to have done it.
    http://www.zmescience.com/computer-r...eness-in-women

    Amit Kagian, an M.Sc. graduate from the TAU School of Computer Sciences, has successfully “taught” a computer how to understand and process the factors which contribute to attractiveness in women. Aside from this being the modern equivalent of “mirror mirror on the wall” and all the vanity that could come from it, it’s actually quite important. The importance lies in the fact that this is a significant breakthrough in creating artificial intelligence in computers.

    “Until now, computers have been taught how to identify basic facial characteristics, such as the difference between a woman and a man, and even to detect facial expressions,” says Kagian. “But our software lets a computer make an aesthetic judgment. Linked to sentiments and abstract thought processes, humans can make a judgment, but they usually don’t understand how they arrived at their conclusions.”

  2. #2
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    in a handbasket
    Posts
    2,537
    In college I learned that humans who have more symmetry in their faces are perceived by us to be more beautiful. Everyone has a best side that they like photographed. This is because we are not perfectly symmetrical. Each side of our faces are different. The more asymmetrical the face, the less likely we are to find it attractive. The larger the eyes and the smaller the chin (like a baby's face) the more attractive the person is percieved to be. After all who doesnt like the look of a baby? I wonder if the computer takes symmetry into account in order to make the judgement of beauty.
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

  3. #3

    technology

    mabye you could make a program that could match peoples faces to what is found on mag covers, however defining beauty is no place for a machine.

  4. #4

    technology

    maybe you could make a program that could match peoples faces to what is found on mag covers, however defining beauty is no place for a machine.

  5. #5
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    in a handbasket
    Posts
    2,537
    I agree, darren. It probably judges the beautifully wrinkled and lived in face of an elder to be unattractive.
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by skippy13
    In college I learned that humans who have more symmetry in their faces are perceived by us to be more beautiful. Everyone has a best side that they like photographed. This is because we are not perfectly symmetrical. Each side of our faces are different. The more asymmetrical the face, the less likely we are to find it attractive. The larger the eyes and the smaller the chin (like a baby's face) the more attractive the person is percieved to be. After all who doesnt like the look of a baby? I wonder if the computer takes symmetry into account in order to make the judgement of beauty.

    I am sure skippy hit it on the dot. Throughout history, man has found beauty in synergies which can be derived by simple mathematical relationships. A couple of these relationships, for example are the golden rectangle (found using the golden ratio of 1.62:1), and the golden spiral (derived from the famous fibonnaci sequence).


    Attachment 21375

    Attachment 21376

    Attachment 21377

    Attachment 21378

    Attachment 21379
    No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

  7. #7
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    in a handbasket
    Posts
    2,537
    Very, very good tufelhunden. (Leonardo Da Vinci used the formula in his drawings and paintings of the human form.)
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

  8. #8
    I think, first of all, that we tend to respond favorably to features that fit a societal norm. For any object we encounter, we have a preset image in our head of what said object "should" look like. If this object deviates too much from what we're expecting, it tends to cause a more complex thought process. Deviations from our internal image of the human face can be disturbing to us since it's much more personal than most other objects we encounter.

    Secondly, I think symmetry is important too because it allows for a more simple thought process. It's visually easier to understand what you're looking at, and something about symmetry just seems to put us at ease.

    Ever notice how positive feelings are much more basic than negative ones? It seems like there's one shade of happy and about a million shades of angry/depressed/confused. Just think of bubblegum pop vs the complex tales of depression and drug addiction found in alternative/grunge.

    Extremely thought-provoking technology, Dr. Young! Thanks for sharing!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-27-2005, 08:38 AM
  2. smallpox research aided by private computers
    By alan in forum Health & Science News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-30-2003, 05:28 PM
  3. DNA based computers?
    By giambjj in forum Health & Science News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-18-2003, 11:59 AM
  4. Talking computers nearing reality
    By Steven Edwards in forum Computers
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-10-2003, 05:02 PM
  5. Computers the key for disabled (sci)
    By Max in forum Ability & Disability News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-29-2002, 01:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •