Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Promising New Nanotechnology For Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #11
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Monroe, LA, USA
    Posts
    3,416
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Xiaoming Xu has now moved to the University of Indiana.

    Wise.
    Thank you very much Dr. Young. I did not know this.

    I would still like to hear from DA concerning my question.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Schmeky
    Thank you very much Dr. Young. I did not know this.

    I would still like to hear from DA concerning my question.
    Yes, I am pretty sure that DA was referring to Xiaoming Xu's work. I was standing next to DA listening to Dr. Xu's presentation. Indiana will have a very strong spinal cord injury program with Dr. Xu as its head. There is also state funding. Dr. Xu is one of the best scientists that I know and he is supported by a very enthusiastic clinical neurosurgery department. Be ready for clinical trials to come.

    Wise.

  3. #13
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    beaumont tx usa
    Posts
    32,389
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Yes, I am pretty sure that DA was referring to Xiaoming Xu's work. I was standing next to DA listening to Dr. Xu's presentation. Indiana will have a very strong spinal cord injury program with Dr. Xu as its head. There is also state funding. Dr. Xu is one of the best scientists that I know and he is supported by a very enthusiastic clinical neurosurgery department. Be ready for clinical trials to come.

    Wise.
    yes schmeky, i was also explaining big medical terms to dr young so he could understand dr Xu.
    anyway, he said he was getting 10,000 axons to grow across the injury site. this was in 2003. 5 years later, what kind of progress do you think he has made? btw, i talked to a doctor who i described as not interested in cure talk. however he recently said his huge sci medical rehab. is moving into a clinical trial/cure mode.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Monroe, LA, USA
    Posts
    3,416
    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    yes schmeky, i was also explaining big medical terms to dr young so he could understand dr Xu.
    anyway, he said he was getting 10,000 axons to grow across the injury site. this was in 2003. 5 years later, what kind of progress do you think he has made? btw, i talked to a doctor who i described as not interested in cure talk. however he recently said his huge sci medical rehab. is moving into a clinical trial/cure mode.
    I also spoke with Dr. Xu at length in 2003. Back then, he said he had been able to get a "squiggly axon stream going" in the lab. He also said we need an axon "river" to realize any functional return. But, he said the lesion site would be a problem, and at that time had no way to get around this.

    You ask "what kind of progress do you think he has made?" Why don't you find out for the forum. Right now, his progress is just a guess unless you (or someone) takes the initiative to find out.

    Make a phone call, let us know.

  5. #15
    Senior Member TEION's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    161

    Cool

    2008 Gill Award Symposium and Ceremony

    Please join us for the 2008 Gill Symposium, May 21 at the Indiana Memorial Union on the campus of Indiana University-Bloomington.

    Symposium speakers include:
    - Xiao-Ming Xu (Stark Neurosciences Research Institute, Indiana University School of Medicine) "Neuroprotective and Regenerative Strategies for the Repair of Spinal Cord Injury."

    ...wonder what he'll say?

    http://iupsyneuro.blogspot.com/2008/...-ceremony.html

  6. #16
    So what do you guys think about this scaffold system? It sounds pretty amazing to me, but does it show real promise or do you think it's just another gimmick leading to a dead end?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason C
    So what do you guys think about this scaffold system? It sounds pretty amazing to me, but does it show real promise or do you think it's just another gimmick leading to a dead end?
    Jason,

    I work closely with investigators (Rutledge Ellis-Behnke and Kwok-Fai So) who are studying this material or material that is very similar to it. Self-assemblying peptides (SAP) were invented at MIT more than a decade ago. In those days, the word nanotechnology had not yet been coined and therefore it was just SAP. Normally, SAP looks like water. However, when exposed to physiological concentrations of ions, they form a gel (yes, they use the fancy term scaffold but it is just a gel). This gel has several very interesting properties.
    • First, it seems to stop bleeding on contact. It is not clear how it does this. Perhaps it is just mechanical plugging up of capillaries. Regardless of mechanism, it really works and I think that SAP will be very important and useful for surgery.
    • Second, axons seem to like growing in SAP. So, if you make a cut in the brain and place SAP into the cut, the cut heals with axons growing through the cut. This happens in the spinal cord as well.
    • Third, stem cells like being in SAP. So, this is going to be a good material both for growing stem cells and for transplanting stem cells to.


    So, you are probably asking the question, so why isn't this material being used in clinical trials and people right now? Well, in all these press announcements and news conferences, the scientists involved are not saying some serious problems they have been encountering.
    • First, the material is quite hard to make reproducibly. It varies from batch to batch and it doesn't always gel when you put it into tissue. Some people think that it is the purity of the ingredients. Others think that it is just intrinsically not that reliable.
    • Second, it is really not all that useful unless you have a space to put the material into. For example, in the contused spinal cord, what are you going do to create the space to put this material into? Will you cut the spinal cord? So, how to apply it in human spinal cord injury is a problem.
    • Third, the safety of the substance has not been established. While some animal data suggest that the material is well-tolerated when transplanted into the brain and spinal cord, more studies are needed to ensure that it does not cause inflammation as it degrades over time and how long the SAP lasts.


    Despite the above caveats and requirements for more data, I am quite excited about all this work and believe that it will be important for spinal cord injury.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 04-10-2008 at 06:51 AM.

  8. #18
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    beaumont tx usa
    Posts
    32,389
    Quote Originally Posted by Schmeky
    I also spoke with Dr. Xu at length in 2003. Back then, he said he had been able to get a "squiggly axon stream going" in the lab. He also said we need an axon "river" to realize any functional return. But, he said the lesion site would be a problem, and at that time had no way to get around this.

    You ask "what kind of progress do you think he has made?" Why don't you find out for the forum. Right now, his progress is just a guess unless you (or someone) takes the initiative to find out.

    Make a phone call, let us know.
    it seems he told you one thing and told a big conference room full of scientist another thing. he said at the conference, once the axons get across, they grow for a few mm then start wandering off to nowhere.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Jason,

    I work closely with investigators (Rutledge Ellis-Behnke and Kwok-Fai So) who are studying this material or material that is very similar to it. Self-assemblying peptides (SAP) were invented at MIT more than a decade ago. In those days, the word nanotechnology had not yet been coined and therefore it was just SAP. Normally, SAP looks like water. However, when exposed to physiological concentrations of ions, they form a gel (yes, they use the fancy term scaffold but it is just a gel). This gel has several very interesting properties.
    • First, it seems to stop bleeding on contact. It is not clear how it does this. Perhaps it is just mechanical plugging up of capillaries. Regardless of mechanism, it really works and I think that SAP will be very important and useful for surgery.
    • Second, axons seem to like growing in SAP. So, if you make a cut in the brain and place SAP into the cut, the cut heals with axons growing through the cut. This happens in the spinal cord as well.
    • Third, stem cells like being in SAP. So, this is going to be a good material both for growing stem cells and for transplanting stem cells to.


    So, you are probably asking the question, so why isn't this material being used in clinical trials and people right now? Well, in all these press announcements and news conferences, the scientists involved are not saying some serious problems they have been encountering.
    • First, the material is quite hard to make reproducibly. It varies from batch to batch and it doesn't always gel when you put it into tissue. Some people think that it is the purity of the ingredients. Others think that it is just intrinsically not that reliable.
    • Second, it is really not all that useful unless you have a space to put the material into. For example, in the contused spinal cord, what are you going do to create the space to put this material into? Will you cut the spinal cord? So, how to apply it in human spinal cord injury is a problem.
    • Third, the safety of the substance has not been established. While some animal data suggest that the material is well-tolerated when transplanted into the brain and spinal cord, more studies are needed to ensure that it does not cause inflammation as it degrades over time and how long the SAP lasts.


    Despite the above caveats and requirements for more data, I am quite excited about all this work and believe that it will be important for spinal cord injury.

    Wise.
    Dr Young,

    The above is your old post. You mentioned SAP. I think there are some nanomedicine in the industry - peptide amphiphiles, micelless. Are they the same as SAP?

    You talked about problem in delivery. I am not a scientist, but for spinal with cyst, may i suggest putting the medicine into the cyst? Even if there is no use for me to suggest.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 18
    Last Post: 12-01-2016, 09:22 AM
  2. Replies: 73
    Last Post: 08-21-2011, 06:56 PM
  3. Replies: 154
    Last Post: 10-22-2007, 06:58 AM
  4. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-23-2005, 06:34 PM
  5. A fervent wish for the coming year
    By Wise Young in forum Cure
    Replies: 103
    Last Post: 01-11-2003, 09:54 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •