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Thread: Promising New Nanotechnology For Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #1

    Promising New Nanotechnology For Spinal Cord Injury

    hey we are back! yahoooo! hi guys!



    Promising New Nanotechnology For Spinal Cord Injury

    ScienceDaily (Apr. 2, 2008) — A spinal cord injury often leads to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation below the site of the injury because the damaged nerve fibers can't regenerate. The nerve fibers or axons have the capacity to grow again, but don't because they're blocked by scar tissue that develops around the injury.

    Northwestern University researchers have shown that a new nano-engineered gel inhibits the formation of scar tissue at the injury site and enables the severed spinal cord fibers to regenerate and grow. The gel is injected as a liquid into the spinal cord and self -assembles into a scaffold that supports the new nerve fibers as they grow up and down the spinal cord, penetrating the site of the injury.

    more....

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0402114819.htm

  2. #2
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Treating spinal cord injury with nanotechnology

    Treating spinal cord injury with nanotechnology

    Current capabilities in nanotechnology not only promise better vehicles for drug delivery, but also provide materials nanoengineered to promote specific tissue healing. From a Northwestern University press release (credit PhysOrg.com) “Promising new nanotechnology for spinal cord injury“:
    A spinal cord injury often leads to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation below the site of the injury because the damaged nerve fibers can’t regenerate. The nerve fibers or axons have the capacity to grow again, but don’t because they’re blocked by scar tissue that develops around the injury.
    Northwestern University researchers have shown that a new nano-engineered gel inhibits the formation of scar tissue at the injury site and enables the severed spinal cord fibers to regenerate and grow. The gel is injected as a liquid into the spinal cord and self-assembles into a scaffold that supports the new nerve fibers as they grow up and down the spinal cord, penetrating the site of the injury.

    http://www.foresight.org/nanodot/?p=2709

  3. #3
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Arrow Nanofibres reconnect nerves

    Nanofibres reconnect nerves



    08 April 2008

    Mice paralysed by spinal injuries have been able to walk again thanks to a treatment developed by scientists in the US. The therapy uses proteins that self-assemble into nanofibres at the site of the injury, encouraging nerves to regrow.
    'Spinal cord injury is rather like cutting a telephone cable,' says John Kessler, leader of the team at Northwestern University, Illinois. 'It's not about replacing cells; it's about reconnecting the wires properly.' But in the spinal cord, although severed nerve fibres are capable of repairing themselves, glial cells that surround the damaged nerves form a scar that blocks the two ends from reconnecting.

    A) Schematic picture showing the structure of the nanofibres; B) The assembled scaffold of nanofibres

    The new treatment involves injecting specially-designed peptides with long hydrophobic tails directly into the site of the injury.
    'When these peptides come into contact with an aqueous solution - such as fluids in the body - the charges in the tails line up and point inwards, forming radial spokes and producing long cylindrical nanofibres,' Kessler explains. 'These nanofibres act as a scaffold that serves a dual purpose, both limiting the amount of glial scarring that occurs and stimulating the nerves to grow

    http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/Ne...l/08040803.asp

  4. #4

    Exclamation Years, not decades

    'Right now there is a lot of excitement about using stem cells or progenitor cells to treat brain or spinal cord injury,' he adds. 'These could be combined with this kind of treatment and I should expect to see human trials in years rather than decades.'
    Kessler's team are also confident that this technology will not be limited to injuries of the nervous system.
    http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/Ne...l/08040803.asp
    ...You cannot control what happens to you, but you can control your attitude toward what happens to you, and in that, you will be mastering change rather than allowing it to master you...

  5. #5
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    Manouli & Max,

    Good information and relevant to future therapies. Nanofibers address one of the most pressing needs for SCI, how to get axons to cross the injury site.

    The better news is there are three dedicated and talented researchers working independently and most importantly, developing different strategies to accomplish the same goal. Of these 3, at least one, should emerge as being effective. Hopefully, we will see chronic clinical trials within the next 5 years.

    Keep an eye on Keirstad, Davies, & Kessler.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    First, this is not true...

    'Spinal cord injury is rather like cutting a telephone cable,' says John Kessler, leader of the team at Northwestern University, Illinois. 'It's not about replacing cells; it's about reconnecting the wires properly.' But in the spinal cord, although severed nerve fibres are capable of repairing themselves, glial cells that surround the damaged nerves form a scar that blocks the two ends from reconnecting.
    Nerves on the opposite side of the injury to the neuron dies and is absorbed by the body. The nerve must be regrown because there is nothing to connect too. Hence the term in sci, regeneration rather then reconnection.

    Good information and relevant to future therapies. Nanofibers address one of the most pressing needs for SCI, how to get axons to cross the injury site.
    getting axons across the injury has been going on for almost 15 years. The neurotrama conference in 2003 highlighted this and one researcher was getting over 10,000 axons to go across the injury site.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    getting axons across the injury has been going on for almost 15 years. The neurotrama conference in 2003 highlighted this and one researcher was getting over 10,000 axons to go across the injury site.
    In humans?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    getting axons across the injury has been going on for almost 15 years. The neurotrama conference in 2003 highlighted this and one researcher was getting over 10,000 axons to go across the injury site.
    Was this Dr. Xu, with the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury research group?

  9. #9
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    some info regarding nervous system here.....
    http://biomed.brown.edu/Courses/BI10...troduction.htm
    How can nerve damage be fixed?

    As of now, there is no cure for nerve damage. To prevent secondary damage, steroids such as methylprednisolone can reduce the swelling that results from spinal cord injury, and Sygen, a recently discovered drug, appears to reduce the loss of nerve function.

    However, recent biotechnology holds promise for nerve regeneration. This commercial (requires QuikTime, source: http://www.adcritic.com) by Nuveen Investments shows Christopher Reeve walking, an optimistic and plausible outlook. Explored here are four ways scientists are trying to regenerate nerves in vivo:
    1) Guidance Channels
    2) Stem Cells
    3) Growth Factors
    4) Gene Therapy
    Last edited by adi chicago; 04-09-2008 at 02:16 PM.
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Schmeky
    Was this Dr. Xu, with the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury research group?
    Xiaoming Xu has now moved to the University of Indiana.

    Wise.

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