Muscle Nerve. 2008 Mar 11 [Epub ahead of print]Related

Pilot study of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Cashman N, Tan LY, Krieger C, Mädler B, Mackay A, Mackenzie I, Benny B, Nantel S, Fabros M, Shinobu L, Yousefi M, Eisen A.

ALS Centre Brain Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons in the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord. It has been proposed that bone marrow (BM)-derived cells might supply motor neurons and other cells with a cellular milieu more conducive to survival in ALS. Direct injection of stem cells in ALS is problematic because of the large expanse of the neuraxis that would need to be injected. We reasoned that transiently increasing the number of circulating hematopoietic stem cells might be a useful therapeutic approach. However, agents stimulating the activation and mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells may have adverse effects such as activation of microglial cells. We conducted a small pilot trial of the collection and reinfusion of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) in ALS patients and found no adverse effects, paving the way for a properly powered therapeutic trial with an optimized regimen of G-CSF. Muscle Nerve, 2007.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum