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Thread: Ibuprofen

  1. #1

    Ibuprofen

    Dr.Young,

    I have got a summary that states that researchers in a particular study showed that the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs ibuprofen and indomethacin can surmount axon growth restrictions from myelin and proteoglycans by potently inhibiting their downstream pathway RhoA signal. I don't know who the authors of this study are. If you know about this study, could you please comment on it, and also would you be able to tell me if these drugs are similar to Cethrin, and if they have a positive effect on CSPG, as is apparently stated. Thank you so,so much in advance Dr.Young. Us spinal cord injured people are SO LUCKY to have a person like you working on our side.

  2. #2
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    Got a headache, cure sci.

  3. #3
    Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Promote Axon Regeneration via RhoA Inhibition

    Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Promote Axon Regeneration via RhoA Inhibition

    Qiao Fu, Jeongsim Hue, and Shuxin Li

    Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390

    Correspondence should be addressed to Shuxin Li, Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8813. Email: shuxin.li@utsouthwestern.edu

    After a CNS injury in the adult mammals, axonal regeneration is very limited because of the reduced intrinsic growth capacity and nonpermissive environment for axonal elongation. The growth inhibitions from CNS myelin and astroglial chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans partially account for the lack of CNS repair. Here, we show that the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen and indomethacin, the drugs widely used as pain relievers in the clinic, can surmount axon growth restrictions from myelin and proteoglycans by potently inhibiting their downstream pathway RhoA signal. Similar to Rho and Rock inhibitors C3 transferase or Y27632 [(R)-(+)-trans-N-(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-aminoethyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide], both NSAID drugs stimulate a significant neurite growth in the cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons exposed to the inhibitory substrates. Systemic administration of ibuprofen to spinal cord-lesioned rodents reverses the active RhoA signal around injury area measured via Rho-GTP binding assay. Subcutaneous injections of ibuprofen via minipumps to rats with a thoracic spinal cord transection or contusion injury result in substantial corticospinal and serotonergic axon sprouting in the caudal spinal cord and promote locomotor functional recovery, even delaying the treatment 1 week after trauma. In contrast, the non-RhoA-inhibiting NSAID naproxen does not have the axon growth-promoting effects on cultured or lesioned neurons. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of RhoA-inhibiting NSAIDs in treating CNS injuries characterized by axonal disconnection including spinal cord injury.

    Key words: axonal growth; spinal cord injury; myelin; chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans; ibuprofen; indomethacin

    Received Oct. 5, 2006; revised March 6, 2007; accepted March 12, 2007.

    Correspondence should be addressed to Shuxin Li, Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8813. Email: shuxin.li@utsouthwestern.edu
    Daniel

  4. #4
    From the previous post.

    Subcutaneous injections of ibuprofen via minipumps to rats with a thoracic spinal cord transection or contusion injury result in substantial corticospinal and serotonergic axon sprouting in the caudal spinal cord and promote locomotor functional recovery, even delaying the treatment 1 week after trauma.
    Interesting. Since the caudal area involves the lumbar/sacral region, I wonder if this could restore voluntary B/B control. Wonder what the outcome would be in chronics if injected directly into the caudal spinal cord.
    Last edited by antiquity; 03-31-2008 at 02:09 AM.

  5. #5
    Could this be taken orally instead of getting it injected into your back? The reason I ask this is because lithium will be taken orally as a growth factor, so could this drug be used in the same way?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by zokarkan
    Could this be taken orally instead of getting it injected into your back? The reason I ask this is because lithium will be taken orally as a growth factor, so could this drug be used in the same way?
    This is very interesting. I think high concentrations are needed. For people with baclofen pumps, this would be an interesting trial. The only problem is that ibuprofen is a very old drug and no company can make a profit so this is the kind of trial that the NIH or private foundations should fund.

    Wise.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    This is very interesting. I think high concentrations are needed. For people with baclofen pumps, this would be an interesting trial. The only problem is that ibuprofen is a very old drug and no company can make a profit so this is the kind of trial that the NIH or private foundations should fund.

    Wise.

    I'm jumping to conclusions here, but say that for instance you decided to include this as the 3rd part of your combination therapy in the China SCINet. Would it be possible to combine ibuprofen with lithium as I have read that they can't be taken together. Also, doesn't ibuprofen make the body release more lithium levels alone?

  8. #8
    [QUOTE=Wise Young]This is very interesting. I think high concentrations are needed. [QUOTE]


    When you say high concentrations, do you mean the maximum amount that adults should take?
    Last edited by zoki83; 03-31-2008 at 10:14 AM.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by zokarkan
    I'm jumping to conclusions here, but say that for instance you decided to include this as the 3rd part of your combination therapy in the China SCINet. Would it be possible to combine ibuprofen with lithium as I have read that they can't be taken together. Also, doesn't ibuprofen make the body release more lithium levels alone?
    I think that you are jumping to conclusions. Where did you read that ibuprofen cannot be taken with lithium? Ibuprofen does not, to my knowledge, make the body release lithium. Wise.

  10. #10

    ?

    How many weeks in Iraq would it take to fund a trial?

    I take ibuprofen on a regular basis, but I'm not up playing basketball yet. I guess time will tell

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