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Thread: Researchers Report Neublastin Virtually Restores Complete Long-Term Sensory Motor Fun

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Cool Researchers Report Neublastin Virtually Restores Complete Long-Term Sensory Motor Fun

    Researchers Report Neublastin Virtually Restores Complete Long-Term Sensory Motor Function in Preclinical Studies

    Findings by Biogen Idec, University of Arizona and Tufts University Reported in Nature Neuroscience

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Biogen Idec (Nasdaq: BIIB), in collaboration with scientists at the University of Arizona and Tufts University reported in the April issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience that in preclinical studies, injections of the protein neublastin promoted the regeneration of damaged sensory nerve cells and produced virtually complete, long-term restoration of sensory and motor function. These studies suggest neublastin has potential for further development as a treatment for traumatic nerve injury.
    Neublastin, also known as artemin, belongs to a family of proteins, called glial-derived neurotrophic factors (GDNF), which promote nerve cell survival. The protein is unique because it acts selectively on sensory neurons. In previous preclinical studies, neublastin reversed a number of features of chronic pain associated with peripheral nerve injury.
    Specifically in the studies, six neublastin injections were administered over 11 days following injury to the dorsal root, a bundle of peripheral nerve fibers adjacent to the spinal cord that transmit sensory information to the central nervous system. The injections promoted nerve growth into the spinal cord and restored the ability to respond normally to a variety of sensory stimuli and perform complex motor activities such as grasping an object on contact. The functional recovery occurred even after a two-day delay in administering neublastin and lasted for more than six months.
    “Sensory nerves entering the spinal cord have minimal capacity to regenerate and severe injury often results in permanent

    http://www.businesswire.com/portal/s...86&newsLang=en

  2. #2
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    great news max.....a cure is all we need.
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  3. #3
    Key word "peripheral nerve injury" we all have Central nerve injury damage, big difference.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee
    Key word "peripheral nerve injury" we all have Central nerve injury damage, big difference.
    ouch curt ...you are right.sci is dffr.
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee
    Key word "peripheral nerve injury" we all have Central nerve injury damage, big difference.
    Yeah. I'm not sure what to make of this.

    I thought the peripheral nervous system was already capable of regeneration.

    Hopefully Wise will chime in.

  6. #6
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    Biogen Idec - Neublastin

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Biogen Idec (Nasdaq: BIIB), in collaboration with scientists at the University of Arizona and Tufts University reported in the April issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience that in preclinical studies, injections of the protein neublastin promoted the regeneration of damaged sensory nerve cells and produced virtually complete, long-term restoration of sensory and motor function. These studies suggest neublastin has potential for further development as a treatment for traumatic nerve injury.

    Neublastin, also known as artemin, belongs to a family of proteins, called glial-derived neurotrophic factors (GDNF), which promote nerve cell survival. The protein is unique because it acts selectively on sensory neurons. In previous preclinical studies, neublastin reversed a number of features of chronic pain associated with peripheral nerve injury.

    Specifically in the studies, six neublastin injections were administered over 11 days following injury to the dorsal root, a bundle of peripheral nerve fibers adjacent to the spinal cord that transmit sensory information to the central nervous system. The injections promoted nerve growth into the spinal cord and restored the ability to respond normally to a variety of sensory stimuli and perform complex motor activities such as grasping an object on contact. The functional recovery occurred even after a two-day delay in administering neublastin and lasted for more than six months.

    http://www.businesswire.com/portal/s...86&newsLang=en

  7. #7
    Dont get to excited everyone, dont mean to be the bearer of bad news but these are peripheral nerves they are talking about not central nerves like the ones SCI people injure, although some SCI's do involve peripheral nerve damage in addition to the central nerve damage.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  8. #8
    Roger,
    Thanks for the post!

    Christopher

  9. #9

    Researchers Report Neublastin Virtually Restores Complete Long Term Sensory Motor Fun

    Researchers Report Neublastin Virtually Restores Complete Long Term Sensory Motor Function In Preclinical Studies


    Biogen Idec (Nasdaq: BIIB), in collaboration with scientists at the University of Arizona and Tufts University reported in the April issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience that in preclinical studies, injections of the protein neublastin promoted the regeneration of damaged sensory nerve cells and produced virtually complete, long-term restoration of sensory and motor function. These studies suggest neublastin has potential for further development as a treatment for traumatic nerve injury.

    Neublastin, also known as artemin, belongs to a family of proteins, called glial-derived neurotrophic factors (GDNF), which promote nerve cell survival. The protein is unique because it acts selectively on sensory neurons. In previous preclinical studies, neublastin reversed a number of features of chronic pain associated with peripheral nerve injury.

    Specifically in the studies, six neublastin injections were administered over 11 days following injury to the dorsal root, a bundle of peripheral nerve fibers adjacent to the spinal cord that transmit sensory information to the central nervous system. The injections promoted nerve growth into the spinal cord and restored the ability to respond normally to a variety of sensory stimuli and perform complex motor activities such as grasping an object on contact. The functional recovery occurred even after a two-day delay in administering neublastin and lasted for more than six months.

    more....

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/102947.php

  10. #10
    Im not an expert and would like to hear Dr Young's take on it, but conus and cauda equina injuries could be helped by this type of treatment, if the nerve roots have been injured. Am I correct?

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