Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Cephalopod sex

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Placerville, CA
    Posts
    8,259
    Quote Originally Posted by chick
    LOL That I can watch. TGOC I won't.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by chick
    Chick, arrrghh, that is disgusting. Wise.

  3. #13
    Senior Member wheelchairTITAN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oakville, ON ... Just North of the 43rd Parallel, SocialistLand
    Posts
    2,043
    I have been puttting off reading and viewing this since Wise first posted. Cephalopod sex just didn't seem to be all that interesting.

    This however is AMAZING! I am so glad I took time to see these amazing creatures. Best four minutes used today ... as if I were good at time mangement ... HA!

    Yes I am male and I am probably "two-faced" some days as well.

    William

    ... rolling since 1989
    ...

    BE NICE!It's free

    P.S. ~ I have "handicapabilities"

    TWITTER: @MacBerry

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by rfbdorf
    Hey, what about the poor cuttlefish?
    Quote Originally Posted by jukespin
    It's just like you to be prejudiced against squid.
    Quote Originally Posted by betheny
    My favorite Wise posts are about octopii.
    Defiition: cephalopod (noun)
    Any of various marine mollusks of the class Cephalopoda, such as the octopus, squid, cuttlefish, or nautilus, having a large head, large eyes, prehensile tentacles, and, in most species, an ink sac containing a dark fluid used for protection or defense.
    http://www.answers.com/topic/cephalopod?cat=health

    Literally translated, the term cephalopod in latin means head-foot. All cephalopods have the following features: a distinctive head, bilateral symmetry (i.e. a left and right side), and arms or tentacles. Octopus have eight arms. Squids have 8 arms plus 2 tentacles. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squid

    Cephalopods are part of the mollusc family which includes shellfishes. However, rather than a muscular foot, they have arms or tentacles. Rather than some series of ganglia for nervous sytems, they have large brains. The octopus brain is the largest of all invertebrate brains. Many studies indicate that the octopus is very intelligent and capable of using tools.

    They have excellent eyesight that not only can see their predators and prey but also can detect color and texture of their environment, transmit this information ot the chromophores on their skin, and replicate it almost perfectly. As illustrated in the video, squids and octopuses have this amazing capability to changing their coloration to blend into their environment.

    The video shows two phenomena that I have never seen before. The first is the male squid changing color on only one side of its body (facing a female that it is trying to mate) and keepin the color on the other side white. The video actually shows the squid switching sides on its colors.

    The second is the cuttlefish backing into a seaweed bush and then changing the patterns of its tentacles so that it looks like seaweed. Although I had seen cuttlefish hanging around the bottom of the sandy shore, changing their coloration so that they look like the bottom, I did not know that they could change their tentacles in this way.

    Can you imagine the intelligence (or at least neural circuitry) required to achieving such camaflougery? Their eyes not only must be able to see the texture, color, movement, and speed but program the brain to change the all parts of the cepaholopod body to behave accordingly.

    Wise.

  5. #15
    Imagine how it would have been if the cephalods were longer lived, and so could have had the opportunity to develop their intelligence!
    - Richard

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by rfbdorf
    Imagine how it would have been if the cephalods were longer lived, and so could have had the opportunity to develop their intelligence!
    - Richard
    Richard, yes... By the way, I wonder what is limiting the lifespans of octopus. It might be a simple thing. hmmm... this is the nucleus of a science fiction classic.

    Wise.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    SW Florida
    Posts
    2,698
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Richard, yes... By the way, I wonder what is limiting the lifespans of octopus. It might be a simple thing. hmmm... this is the nucleus of a science fiction classic.

    Wise.
    Kind of like It Came From Beneath the Sea. I have this movie on DVD.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Came...eneath_the_Sea


  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Placerville, CA
    Posts
    8,259
    Quote Originally Posted by ala
    Kind of like It Came From Beneath the Sea. I have this movie on DVD.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Came...eneath_the_Sea

    Ala, you just like to show off by throwing out random movie knowledge.

    Octopuses have three hearts. Two pump blood through each of the two gills, while the third pumps blood through the body.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus

    Nice!
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  9. #19

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •