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Thread: Recovery of walking

  1. #1
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    Recovery of walking



    Forgive me. I suspect everyone knows this but me...

    In a recent article from Wise—about football injuries and more—you cited a study from even back in the 90s that reported remarkable levels of recovery. I figure from your descriptions I’m Asia C or D, of whom all or the vast majority achieved recovery of independent walking. How did they and where can I go to get there? Just getting back upright posture would change my life. Getting forearm crutches back—which I totally lost only a couple of years ago when weakness from my injury limitations caught up with me—would defy words. What do I do to make that happen?

    Also, any ideas for getting my hands and arms more fully back? I can feel it coming from my neck and upper back, and thought it was weakness and lack of coordination, but I’m starting to think it’s increased tone, which I think is at the base of all my functional loss since falling. Is there anything short of a baclofen pump I can try for that? I can’t tolerate any of the oral antispasmodics, or even neurontin.

  2. #2
    Random, can you give a bit more information that describes your injury level, current capabilities, which state you live in, ect. I take it you could walk somewhat with arm crutches in the past. One of the best ways to increase this capability is to partake in an ambulatory gait training program. As for spastic, are you having gastric problems when taking Baclofen? I believe this drug is now available as a transdermal gel. There are also surgical methods available to help control spastic (other than implanting a baclofin pump), but I would ask the Spinal Nurse about this.
    "So I have stayed as I am, without regret, seperated from the normal human condition." Guy Sajer

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    Please forgive me, but I’m a little shy about committing my story to print. My whole cervical cord is atrophied and sensitive, so it’s hard to say, says the meurosurgeon, where exactly is the injury that so compromised my function, taught me the meaning of increased tone and spasms, after I fell. Oral baclofen made me dopey and tired and Zanaflex was even worse, left me slurring my speech like a drunk. My post-fall limitations have left me weaker, so I don’t want to take anything that compromises my strength. I guess I really need to find a careful balance—just enough of something that calms the spasms so I can sleep and tames the tone so I can be functional enough to get stronger (making my hands work would be a great bonus). I have hesitated to try the pump to achieve this because a stimulator trial on S3 really bothered me, and because I fear getting weaker.

    I didn’t know they had transdermal baclofen. Might that let me regulate the dose and find efficacy in a smaller dose, as I believe the pump is supposed to do?

    If there is some kind of surgical approach, I very much would appreciate learning about it.

    I live in Central NJ and need to find something more intensive and productive than just PT. That’s part of the reason I was curious about the article, which said I think results were the same whether weight-supported treadmill or not. Even Kessler didn’t have that kind of equipment.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Random
    Please forgive me, but I’m a little shy about committing my story to print. My whole cervical cord is atrophied and sensitive, so it’s hard to say, says the meurosurgeon, where exactly is the injury that so compromised my function, taught me the meaning of increased tone and spasms, after I fell. Oral baclofen made me dopey and tired and Zanaflex was even worse, left me slurring my speech like a drunk. My post-fall limitations have left me weaker, so I don’t want to take anything that compromises my strength. I guess I really need to find a careful balance—just enough of something that calms the spasms so I can sleep and tames the tone so I can be functional enough to get stronger (making my hands work would be a great bonus). I have hesitated to try the pump to achieve this because a stimulator trial on S3 really bothered me, and because I fear getting weaker.

    I didn’t know they had transdermal baclofen. Might that let me regulate the dose and find efficacy in a smaller dose, as I believe the pump is supposed to do?

    If there is some kind of surgical approach, I very much would appreciate learning about it.

    I live in Central NJ and need to find something more intensive and productive than just PT. That’s part of the reason I was curious about the article, which said I think results were the same whether weight-supported treadmill or not. Even Kessler didn’t have that kind of equipment.
    Hi, Randy. I wish that i knew what to suggest. As you know, I am puzzled by what is causing your problems. It may well be a combination of trauma and multiple sclerosis. You should be able to get lower doses of baclofen (pediatric doses?) without having to go to a transdermal approach. But, if you can get some transdermal baclofen, it is worth a try.

    On the more general question of what to do beyond physical therapy, I am wondering if lithium may be helpful for you. The reason is that it is known to increase neurotrophin production in the spinal cord. There is a growing literature suggesting that lithium may be useful for Alzheimer's disease. I know that you don't have Alzheimer's disease but lithium may reduce or reverse some neurodegenerative disease. Unfortunately, I am in India right now and there internet is not working properly. I can't get onto most web sites. If you do a google search for lithium and neurodegenerative diseases you will see a lot of article on th subject.

    Wise.

  5. #5
    Random

    Have you checked out Push to Walk in NJ?
    www.pushtowalknj.org


    Eric Harness, CSCS
    Founder/President
    Neuro Ex, Inc
    Adaptive Performance and Neuro Recovery

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    Senior Member Lois's Avatar
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    Push to Walk will have a booth at the Expo this year. Hope you can make it there.

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    Thanks everyone. I realize I got lost rambling and failed to say that what I most am hoping to learn is the universe of recovery programs and their strengths and weaknesses, and any insights anyone might have about which might be best for me. If I can con my abysmal insurance into anything, it will be only one, so I want to choose well. I just discovered the incredible offer from SCI-STEP and I’m going to pursue that, and I thank you for letting me know about and will look into Push to Walk in NJ, but I’m still interested in knowing all that’s out there. I don’t want to limit answers to just this, but does any program use a regular cold---vs body temp—pool, or have a weight supported treadmill?
    Wise, I’m seeing a new MS guy soon and hoping to try everything that might mitigate whatever of this is MS (and I’ll pursue lithium with him, thanks), but there is no doubt in my mind (confirmed by new experience) that it’s mechanical insult to my fragile cord that so has catapulted me to (or more aptly, buried me in) my current state. I had MS for 13 years without knowing the meaning of spasticity, or transferring as other than a transitive verb—things I learned within weeks of falling. Getting a bit stronger will make a significant functional difference for me. I’m excited about a recovery program. And keeping my ears perpetually perked for regeneration options

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    Wise, I don’t think I brought you along on my leap above. The reason I think recovery will help so much is that falling resulted primarily in the debilitating tone and spasms and clonus. The weakness that I suspect is the impediment to standing and the basic function I so miss grew gradually, as all the rest impeded the activities that would have sustained my strength. So stopping the spiral down and getting stronger and upright enough to fight the tone and be able to continue strengthening on my own, and manage daily life better, might sustain me tolerably until science fixes me. I’m so glad we’ve got you working on that.

    (And I think I meant to say that I’d never before falling known ‘transferring’ as a reflexive verb, something you have to do to yourself. Maybe I couldn’t walk far without a forearm crutch or two, but I never imagined I’d do anything in small spheres other than just ‘move’ from one place to another.)

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