Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Racing wheels on everyday chair

  1. #1

    Question Racing wheels on everyday chair

    I was wondering if anyone has first or secondhand experience of adding a push rim to a wheelchair racing wheel (e.g., carbon fiber HED) for everday use. I'm already using 26" wheels (650c) so that's not an issue for me.

  2. #2
    I've seen a few people do it, but after 17 years and being T-2 I'll stick with the regular. Seems to me it would not be beneficial for everyday use......but I've been wrong before........

  3. #3
    I like the open look and convenience of X-Core wheels but not their weight. I have no experience with HED racing wheels but they're true carbon fiber wheels and, judging from the price and their professional application, I'm guessing they're much higher quality than X-Cores.

    I was wondering how they compare in weight to, say, Spinergy LXs and if they can be customized with standard size hand rims.

    Are there any racing experts here than can tackle this question?

  4. #4
    Wow...honestly....
    I would use those rims on my standard everyday chair unless I had $$$$ to burn.

    I use Spinergy as my everday rim and just luv them.
    But HED racing wheels while extremely lite are very stiff and may not hold up to everyday pounding.

    I use ZIPPS on my racing HC and would never think about using those as everyday.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Cappy
    But HED racing wheels while extremely lite are very stiff and may not hold up to everyday pounding.
    Why wouldn't a carbon fiber wheel hold up to everyday pounding? I imagine that they would be more durable, not less. And what for you is "everyday pounding?" Aren't these wheels used in Tour De France-type racing?

  6. #6
    I guess it depends on how ya use them.
    Are you banging into things?
    Do ya take ur wheels off when you transport ur chair in a vehicle?
    Are they in a place to chip the CF?
    Constant chipping will lead to a weak point and potential cracking.
    Once cracked...wheel is wasted. IMHO

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Cappy
    Are they in a place to chip the CF?
    Constant chipping will lead to a weak point and potential cracking.
    Once cracked...wheel is wasted.
    Carbon fiber doesn't "chip" and if it's made right, it's damn hard to crack.

    C.

  8. #8
    Ever see the pictures of the America's Cup yacht from Australia made from carbon fiber that broke in two and sank in less than 2 minutes off the shore of San Diego in 1995? Carbon fiber can fail, and when it does, it does it spectacularly!

    (KLD)

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Tiger Racing
    Carbon fiber doesn't "chip" and if it's made right, it's damn hard to crack.

    C.
    Tiger,

    I know you are a cf expert, but you'd have to agree that carbon fiber components are designed for a specific application. It will be extremely strong if the force applied is perpendicular it's surface, but it is more susceptible to chips or fraying at the edges. I know one veteran who trashed one of his Zipp's when he had a blow out in his racing chair.

    Stephen,

    Carbon fiber will also be more likely to fail where it is drilled or compressed by tightened fasteners. Think of the holes for the brackets in the shell on your JetStream and the hardware ADI uses to reinforce it. Now think of what you would have to do with a racing wheel to get similar integrity when mounting a handrim.

    But what about X-Cores, they are made of carbon fiber and have handrims?

    The outer rim of an X-Core was specifically designed for a handrim. The trade off is that the hub portion was not designed for higher camber applications (most manufacturers will limit camber to 0, 2 or 3 degrees max if X-Cores are ordered on their chairs). They probably limit the strength at the hub to keep the weight of the wheels acceptable. Racing wheels have a stronger hub because they are designed for higher camber applications, yet they need to be as light as possible. I would suspect that the carbon fiber out at the periphery is probably extremely thin.

    To summarize, carbon fiber is extremely strong when the component was properly designed for a particular application. If the same design is used in an application for which it was not intended, the possibility of failure can increase significantly.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse
    Ever see the pictures of the America's Cup yacht from Australia made from carbon fiber that broke in two and sank in less than 2 minutes off the shore of San Diego in 1995? Carbon fiber can fail, and when it does, it does it spectacularly!
    I never stated or implied that carbon fibre cannot fail and I don't need to watch a boat race from a decade ago to know that it happens. (BTW, you do know that there have been safety improvements since then? I would think that much of the technology has been applied to racing yachts.) I've seen entire front clips on race cars shatter to bits in recent races from spectacular hits. The good news is that many cockpits are now carbon fibre, safety cells that protect the driver from what just a few years ago would have been deadly accidents.

    C.

Similar Threads

  1. My Colours Spazz G
    By CapnGimp in forum Equipment
    Replies: 76
    Last Post: 04-13-2008, 06:28 PM
  2. Need Wheelchair Help
    By SteveW in forum Equipment
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 11-01-2007, 12:46 AM
  3. Emotion Wheels $2,250 (or w/ Ti chair $4500)
    By spaceboy in forum Equipment & Services
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-01-2006, 12:07 PM
  4. The New iGlide Wheelchair
    By wheeliegirl in forum Equipment & Services
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-15-2004, 01:04 AM
  5. UBC chair named in locals' honour
    By Max in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-16-2003, 06:59 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •