Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Electric stimulator for denervated muscle...

  1. #1

    Electric stimulator for denervated muscle...

    I wanted to find out if there was any specific electric stimulator (FES) for helping with denervated muscles. I currently have a Challenger 2000 from the Petrofsky center. It works great and I have been using it for about 11 years. My left thighs are a lot more atrophied and it does not seem to help that as much as my right thighs.

    It does what it is supposed to do, so I have no complaints, however, I am looking for an FES which can help the strenght in my left thighs which are atrophied due to denervation.

    Any help will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    I've heard of the Stimulette 3000, but never used it. I know that
    there are members who have. Unfortunately they are not
    available in U.S.

  3. #3
    Senior Member mattblan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    N. California
    Posts
    1,151
    Can anyone answer findacure's question? I am looking for a high energy stimulator as well.

  4. #4
    Senior Member pumpingiron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    228
    I got the EMS 4000R with Russian stim and it is powerfull.

    RUSSIAN STIM. VITAL STIM MODELS 4000R

    EMS AND RUSSIAN STIMULATION FOR HOME AND CLINICAL APPLICATIONS


    OPERATING MODES: EMS, RUSSIAN STIMULATION
    4 Channels(4000R), Channels Isolated
    Waveform: Biphasic or Mono-Phasic
    Standard Mode Frequency: 2 - 140 Hertz
    Russian Stimulation Mode: 2500 Hertz @ 50 PPS
    Reciprocation: Yes
    Pulse Width: 200 microseconds
    Ramp Time: 3 Seconds
    Contraction Time: variable 3 to 45 Seconds
    Relaxation Time: variable 3 to 45 Seconds
    • Power Output: 0 - 34.3 microColumbs (100 volts)

    Power: 110V US AC-DC Power adapter
    Pads: Eight 4" Round and Four 2.5" Round
    Eight Velcro Straps and 2oz tube of Vital Gel
    Dimensions: 3 1/4"(H) x 8" (W) x 8" (L)
    Fuse: 250V 4A slow blow
    FREE Four Pack of 3" Round Self Adhesive Electrodes
    One Year Manufacturer's Warranty

  5. #5
    Senior Member mattblan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    N. California
    Posts
    1,151

    Thumbs up Close :)

    PumpingIron,

    That is a great stimulator, but it doesn't quite have the precision and the pulse width is just a bit too short. I know you have said in the past that you use it to lift light weights with your extremities. Thank you for the response, definitely, I appreciate it.

    We are running into the problem where everything we can find is on one end of the spectrum or the other. Either for electronics and not powerful enough, or for the end user and not sophisticated enough. I search for what we need and I get thousands of hits filled with research papers and patent applications, but no product.

    Thanks again for the reply. By the way, we can really use your input later in the development process.

    ~Matt

  6. #6
    Matt,

    What frequency, pulse-width and power (volts / amps) are you looking for? The circuit I have designed can vary the frequency and pulse-width to pretty much any setting (within reason) and you can have as many volts as you dare!!

    Let me know what you targets are and I will tell you if my circuit is up to it!

    BR

  7. #7
    On June 1st, Therapeutic Alliances, the manufacturer of the ERGYS FES bike, introduced its latest version of the bike, the E3. (There are no pictures up yet.) The 6-channel stimulator that powers the ergometer also functions as a removeable, stand-alone muscle stimulator. You don't have to buy the bike to get the stimulator. You might consider contacting James Schorey, the company president, to see if this unit meets your needs.

  8. #8
    Senior Member mattblan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    N. California
    Posts
    1,151
    Bikeracer, It looks like your solution may be the best. I wanted to stick with off the shelf products to avoid liability, but apparently there have not been stimulators like this on the market since the 1980's.

    I wonder if there are any lawyers on the forum experienced in these matters who might be willing to share information.

    Bikeracer,

    I will send you an email later tonight and we can go through some specifications. Thanks again!

  9. #9
    Senior Member pumpingiron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    228

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by mattblan
    PumpingIron,

    That is a great stimulator, but it doesn't quite have the precision and the pulse width is just a bit too short. I know you have said in the past that you use it to lift light weights with your extremities. Thank you for the response, definitely, I appreciate it.

    We are running into the problem where everything we can find is on one end of the spectrum or the other. Either for electronics and not powerful enough, or for the end user and not sophisticated enough. I search for what we need and I get thousands of hits filled with research papers and patent applications, but no product.

    Thanks again for the reply. By the way, we can really use your input later in the development process.

    ~Matt
    No prob matt

  10. #10
    Hi, I'm new hear.

    Sorry to thread-jack, but hopefully someone can help me w/ some burns I've been getting.

    I have denervated muscles in my hips, glutes and lower legs from a compression fracture of L1 9 yrs ago. About a month ago I got my own strong EMS machine, w/ DC current. The AC can alternate from on/off, but the DC can't, it's just on at whatever frequency and intensity I set it at. I don't have any health insurance and saved up the $ and bought it myself.

    The AC is great, but the DC feels nothing like the DC I used in therapy soon after my accident (which could alternate on/off). The first time I used mine on DC I had it on fairly strong for 30 min (5 volts) and got two of the worst burns I've ever gotten, both about dime sized. This was almost a month ago and I'm estimating they're only 50% healed.

    The therapist I got it through said it had likely been too long since my injury to have the same effect as in therapy (where I had it on DC for up to 30 min) and the burns were because of a chemical reaction from having it on for too long. So I've been using it night and morning 5 min each and it was fine for a while, then a week ago I got another burn a bit smaller and not as bad as before. I had gradually worked up to 20 volts but that last time it was only at 15.

    Any idea why I'm getting these burns or something I can do to stop them and/or make the action more effective?

Similar Threads

  1. Helping muscle regenerate
    By carbar in forum Cure
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-02-2006, 10:01 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-15-2004, 10:08 AM
  3. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-03-2004, 08:41 PM
  4. Muscular Dystrophy Study May Lead to Muscle Regeneration Therapies
    By antiquity in forum Health & Science News
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-11-2002, 12:46 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-08-2002, 12:19 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •