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Thread: What are the best tips caring a new born baby?

  1. #1

    What are the best tips caring a new born baby?

    Ournew child is on the way in this coming March, 4 2008. We
    are needed a lot of good tips information to care this newborn baby.
    We need yours advice because this is our first child. We want this
    newborn baby in special care, nutrition, nourish, or special ways.

    Thank You
    Last edited by willow4; 01-14-2008 at 12:49 AM.

  2. #2
    Hi willow,

    Congratulations on your pregnancy!
    Prenatally, it is wise to select an OB that will coordinate care with your sCI doctor.

    Rre newborn card, there is much written on the subject-chances are, you will be inundated with information, books and advice from many people.
    Newborn care isn't much different than if you are AB-the difference would be in getting the support and help you will need for yourself.

    I am curious what others have to say and if you have specific questions, please ask. I recall my first pregnancy and it is such a special time in your life!

    AAD

  3. #3
    Willow, do you or your husband have a SCI? It doesn't indicate this on your profile. Are you aware that this website is for people with spinal cord injuries, their family members or caregivers? We are not designed or equipped to to provide on all types of health care problems. If you don't have a SCI, I would suggest you look for sites designed for expectant parents, consult your OB, and ask to see an OB nurse and get into childbirth preparation classes that will help you with these issue. There are also tons of books available. Check out Amazon.com

    (KLD)

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse
    Willow, do you or your husband have a SCI? It doesn't indicate this on your profile. Are you aware that this website is for people with spinal cord injuries, their family members or caregivers? We are not designed or equipped to to provide on all types of health care problems. If you don't have a SCI, I would suggest you look for sites designed for expectant parents, consult your OB, and ask to see an OB nurse and get into childbirth preparation classes that will help you with these issue. There are also tons of books available. Check out Amazon.com

    (KLD)
    Yes, my husband have a SCI. Thanks for your reply.

  5. #5
    What level is his SCI?

    There are several good forums for disabled parents. Check these out for information about how he can modify equipment and techniques to help care for your child:

    http://carecure.rutgers.edu/mobilewo...oresources.php

    (KLD)

  6. #6
    Senior Member kate's Avatar
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    My kids are 17 and 19, so it's been a long time . . . it seems to me that the best advice doesn't change, though.

    Love the little one with everything you've got. You're sure to be sleep-deprived, cranky, emotionally wobbly, and a lot busier. Parenting give new meaning to the word "relentless." It doesn't matter; infancy is this weird phase in which every day seems to last about a year, and a year seems to go by in the space of a week or two.

    Arrange for lots of help in the first couple of months; it's easy to be isolated and frustrated and there's no need. An hour or two all to yourself once a week or so can save you, and most people are glad to show up and hold a newborn for a little while.

    If you can, join a babysitting coop. They saved me.

  7. #7
    If you live near an SCI center, you might be able to link up with other couples who have young children or are pregnant. It's always helpful to have support that understands your situation.
    Congratulations to both of you.
    CKF

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    connecticut
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    8,272
    Quote Originally Posted by kate

    Arrange for lots of help in the first couple of months; it's easy to be isolated and frustrated and there's no need. An hour or two all to yourself once a week or so can save you, and most people are glad to show up and hold a newborn for a little while.
    Yes, even if they come over so you can take a long shower and not worry if the baby is crying.

    Do you live in the United States? (I am not sure from your post, but it sounds slightly like ENglish is not your first language.) I know around here there are usually support groups you can get involved with, other mothers and babies.
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    I'm a T8 post injury 4 years. My wife is able bodied. We had twins, boy and a girl last April. I assume your questions are regarding caring for a child as an SCI.

    I think it all depends on level of injury and physical ability. I know before they were born I was constantly worried about not being able to pick them up in different scenarios.

    If it's not too late, get a crib where the wall pulls down. Otherwise as you start to move the bed lower, your husband won't be able to get them out of the crib.

    When they were really small, I would hold them in one arm and then push one of the wheels lightly back and forth. That would help rock them to sleep.

    I really had no problems picking them up or changing them during the first 6 months. Once they get around 20 pounds and are squirming all over the place, it gets tough.

    Overalls type outfits makes it nicer for me because it gives me more to grab on to. I always get worried about grabbing them with their arms.

    It's frustrating when they are on the floor matt crying and I just can't get close enough to pick them up. (I could if I really had to but it's hard on the upper back).

    It's amazing how fast babies learn. We've been trying to train them to hug onto my forearm when I'm reaching in the crib to get them out. They seem to be picking it up.

    I have older neices and nephews and it's much easier to pick kids up once they are standing. (but then I'm sure that comes with othe problems )

    Another must have is a baby sling that's centered (versus on one side). This will make it easy for you husband to move around in the wheelchair with the baby.

    A large desk with lots of space is great for your husband to roll underneath and change the kids.

  10. #10
    I had my babies sleeping in my own bed when they were small so I did not have to get up in the night to breast feed them. Here they recommend to sleep with your baby to make it safe as long as you are not smoking.
    TH 12, 43 years post

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