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Thread: Walk Soft: Nerve Rewiring Restores Most Movement Post–Spinal Injury

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Wink Walk Soft: Nerve Rewiring Restores Most Movement Post–Spinal Injury

    Walk Soft: Nerve Rewiring Restores Most Movement Post–Spinal Injury

    When nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord are severed, rerouting signals through local nerve cells can make movement possible again

    By Nikhil Swaminathan
    AFTER CUTTING THE CORD: Scientists showed that intrinsic spine neurons can substitute for long nerve fibers (which connect directly to the brain) that are severed in spinal cord injury to restore waling ability.
    © ISTOCKPHOTO/SEBASTIAN KAULITZKI
    cientists showed that intrinsic spine neurons can substitute for long nerve fibers (which connect directly to the brain) that are severed in spinal cord injury to restore waling ability.
    Often spinal cord injuries result in the severing of the long nerve fibers connecting the brain to the spinal cord, disrupting one's ability to walk, among other things. But even with the primary top-to-bottom signal highway rendered out of order, the nervous system can, over time, reroute itself, finding neural detours and side streets that restore movement, according to a new study out of the University of California, Los Angeles (U.C.L.A.).
    "It's been known for some time that after certain types of lesions, animals and human[s] will recover their ability to walk," notes Michael Sofroniew, a professor of neurobiology at U.C.L.A.'s David Geffen School of Medicine. For instance, if the long nerve fibers on only one side of the spinal cord are damaged, "the previous explanation is that the other [intact] side was able to activate things," he adds.

    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=...tores-movement
    Last edited by Max; 01-06-2008 at 06:43 PM.

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    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    UCLA scientists restore walking after spinal cord injury

    UCLA scientists restore walking after spinal cord injury

    January 6, 2008 04:45 PM
    Spinal cord damage blocks the routes that the brain uses to send messages to the nerve cells that control walking. Until now, doctors believed that the only way for injured patients to walk again was to re-grow the long nerve highways that link the brain and base of the spinal cord. For the first time, a UCLA study shows that the central nervous system can reorganize itself and follow new pathways to restore the cellular communication required for movement.

    http://www.biologynews.net/archives/...rd_injury.html

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    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Mice bring hope to the paralysed after they overcome spinal injuries and start walkin

    Mice bring hope to the paralysed after they overcome spinal injuries and start walking again

    By FIONA MACRAE - Fighter: Superman Christopher Reeve and his wife Dana in June 2003. He paralysed after a riding accident in 1995 but laboured long and hard to regain his senses

    Mice found to walk again after suffering crippling spinal injuries may help humans do the same.


    Scientists have been amazed at the speed at which the rodents apparently cure themselves, walking within eight weeks.
    They discovered that the animals are able to adjust to their injury by diverting messages from the brain, around the damaged area, to limbs.
    This could be a major breakthrough for 2,000 Britons each year who are unable to walk after damaging their spinal cord. In a few human cases the condition

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...n_page_id=1965



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    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Rerouting signals along the neural highway

    Rerouting signals along the neural highway

    By Matt Ford | Published: January 06, 2008 - 08:27PM CT
    Some of the most devastating injuries can come from damage to the spinal cord. If the nerves there are damaged, it can mean loss of appendage control or worse. Even a decade or two ago, it was commonly believed that spinal injuries were irreversible, and the nervous system could not adapt to any such injury without some form of radical treatment.
    New work reported in the January issue of Nature Medicine has shown this is not entirely true. Researchers at UCLA found that neural pathways will re-organize themselves to find a way for motor control signals to reach their destinations, even when an injury in the spinal cord—which represents the most direct route—blocks the most efficient path. Using the analogy of drivers on the road, Michael Sofroniew, lead author of the study, says, "when there’s a traffic accident on the freeway [the spinal cord], what do drivers do? They take shorter surface streets. These detours aren’t as fast or direct, but still allow drivers to reach their destination."
    Using mice as their model, Sofroniew and colleagues
    http://arstechnica.com/journals/scie...neural-highway

  5. #5
    "What we demonstrate here is that the body can use alternate nerve pathways to deliver instructions that control walking.

    "We have identified what appears to be a previously unrecognised mechanism for recovery of function after these kinds of injuries.
    Ummm, central pattern generator and plasticity? Thought we already knew this.

    Wonder how severe the rats were injured in this study because we also already know that rats with hemisection injuries can regain a lot of movement without treatment.
    Last edited by antiquity; 01-06-2008 at 11:53 PM.

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    When they do damage to a mouse/rat at C3 with a complete injury let me know... must be great to be a rat... sounds like biofeedback to me.
    keiffer66

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    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Angry

    I'm more disgusted that author dragger Late Dana & CR, as illustration, into his article.

    Let them Rest in Peace

  8. #8
    Scientists Restore Walking In Mice After Spinal Cord Injury

    ScienceDaily (Jan. 7, 2008) — Spinal cord damage blocks the routes that the brain uses to send messages to the nerve cells that control walking. Until now, doctors believed that the only way for injured patients to walk again was to re-grow the long nerve highways that link the brain and base of the spinal cord. For the first time, a UCLA study shows that the central nervous system can reorganize itself and follow new pathways to restore the cellular communication required for movement.

    The discovery could lead to new therapies for the estimated 250,000 Americans who suffer from traumatic spinal cord injuries. An additional 10,000 cases occur each year, according to the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, which helped fund the UCLA study

    more:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0106193147.htm

  9. #9
    News - January 6, 2008

    Walk Soft: Nerve Rewiring Restores Most Movement Post–Spinal Injury
    When nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord are severed, rerouting signals through local nerve cells can make movement possible again
    By Nikhil Swaminathan



    AFTER CUTTING THE CORD: Scientists showed that intrinsic spine neurons can substitute for long nerve fibers (which connect directly to the brain) that are severed in spinal cord injury to restore waling ability.
    © ISTOCKPHOTO/SEBASTIAN KAULITZKI

    Often spinal cord injuries result in the severing of the long nerve fibers connecting the brain to the spinal cord, disrupting one's ability to walk, among other things. But even with the primary top-to-bottom signal highway rendered out of order, the nervous system can, over time, reroute itself, finding neural detours and side streets that restore movement, according to a new study out of the University of California, Los Angeles (U.C.L.A.).

    "It's been known for some time that after certain types of lesions, animals and human[s] will recover their ability to walk," notes Michael Sofroniew, a professor of neurobiology at U.C.L.A.'s David Geffen School of Medicine. For instance, if the long nerve fibers on only one side of the spinal cord are damaged, "the previous explanation is that the other [intact] side was able to activate things," he adds.

    more:

    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=...tores-movement

  10. #10
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    This is great, IF you have sufficient surviving axon tracks. Most of us don't. Plasticity has been discussed on this forum many times. We need regeneration to take advantage of plasticity.

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