Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 94

Thread: iMac vs. PC?

  1. #21
    I recall hearing that there was a recent report about Macs and the need for an antivirus program. I believe the user would have his machine compromised (Trojan horse) by downloading pirated copy of iWork 09. Otherwise I am not aware of any viruses in the wild for Macs. ClamAV is a free antivirus that you can run on your Mac. I don't use any security software on my Intel iMac. I also don't download illegal or pirated copies of software for either my Mac or Windows machine.
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
    --General George Patton

    Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
    ––Paul Nussbaum
    usc87.blogspot.com

  2. #22
    if you're deciding between a mac or windows pc, you want to evaluate it based on whether it'll be able to do all your computing needs, and not just on the aesthetic factor.

    also the argument that mac is more secure than windows is no longer true. it's been proven that mac's are a lot easier to hack than windows. to those mac owners, don't get to comfortable not using an anti-virus. the time will come when security by obscurity will no longer work.

  3. #23
    Macs are no more "virus-resistant" than Windows. They merely haven't been targets due to the sheer numbers factor. Those who write malware haven't wanted to be bothered targeting a population of users that was so small when they could target 95% of users instead. However, as Macs have gained popularity, malware programmers have started to turn their attention to the Mac OS. Apple themselves are now recommending their users install antivirus software.

    The Mac OS also can no longer claim greater stability. In the past, yes. But since Windows having scrapped their 9.x lines, and starting from scratch with the advent of XP, and Macs using Intel processors, the differences between the two systems have narrowed. Honestly, I have a PC and haven't had my system crash, not once, since the conversion to XP either. I am not a diehard fan of Windows, far from it, I can criticize the OS with the best. I consider it a necessary evil, else I would be running strictly a Linux box myself. However, I have used Macs, DOS, Windows, Unix, and Linux, and have a second degree in computer science. Anybody who is using the internet and not running an antivirus program, good firewall, and spyware programs is just plain foolish, no matter what OS they are using. Justifying it by saying one has never been previously infected is like saying one won't get this year's flu shot since one has never had the strains of flu covered by the injection. You may have been lucky so far but eventually you will get nailed.

    And thinking downloading illegal or pirated software is required for exposure to malware is naive. I have run into trojans and viruses (stopped dead by my AV software), do you think that I participate in this kind of activity, or even unknown executables from email? Malware writers are clever these days, e.g. you can be exposed merely by running the scripts found on web pages. Sure, you can turn off those scripts if you want. However, you will have lost an essential part of today's web browsing experience, something I can't imagine anyone here would be willing to give up, and why should you? Anti-malware programs are easy to install, run, update, and free versions readily available. All that you lose are some processor and memory usage, which with today's gigabyte processors and memory, should be insignificant for the vast majority of users (c'mon, how many here need to run fast real-time applications? some gaming applications maybe, ok, temporarily close the anti-malware program, although those folks likely already have high-end memory and processor capacity which will further add to the insignificance factor).

    I can't figure out the downside, and why people would want to gamble.......... definitely a case of an ounce of prevention being worth a pound of cure. But, it's not MY computer, I won't have to try to clean it up.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by PN View Post
    I recall hearing that there was a recent report about Macs and the need for an antivirus program. I believe the user would have his machine compromised (Trojan horse) by downloading pirated copy of iWork 09. Otherwise I am not aware of any viruses in the wild for Macs. ClamAV is a free antivirus that you can run on your Mac. I don't use any security software on my Intel iMac. I also don't download illegal or pirated copies of software for either my Mac or Windows machine.
    Paul,

    I use to use anti-viral software for the "old" Mac operating system 1-9 (yes I started using the first Mac in 1983. However, since 1999, I have not used *any* anti-viral program for Mac OSX. Yes, I kept up the antiviral programs until 2006. Although I spend as much time or more than most people on internet and use my computer 10-20 hours a day, I have not had a single infection for over ten years.

    In contrast, when I use Windows on my Mac, I must spend about half of my computer's CPU time installing anti-viral software and checking for and finding viruses. Most of the vulnerabilities of the Windows system to viruses and other unwelcome security risks result from the decisions by Microsoft to install powerful command software that can be executed by documents. So, for example, the few security problems that do exist on the Mac have come from Microsoft programs such as Word, Excel, and Entourage and the macro programs that they have.

    Like you, I do not use any third-party "security" software for my Mac. I do not use any firewalls between my computer and internet. I allow "all incoming connections". By the way, I have connected my computer to many hundreds of ethernet ports and countless wireless connections. The vast majority of Mac users that I know do not have any special protection. So, whenever I hear about all the trouble that Windows users have with security and viruses, I heave a sigh of relief that I don't have to deal with such problems.

    This is not to say that the Mac cannot be infiltrated by a determined hacker and that it is invulnerable to attack. It can be attacked and perhaps Mac users have been lulled into a false sense of complacency. Perhaps I might wake up one day to find my computer attacked by a malicious virus that wiped out my hard disk. But, this has yet to happen. For whatever reason, Mac users are simply not bothered by viruses and this is well worth the price difference between a Windows and Mac computer.

    By the way, I think that if one matched feature for feature, the price difference is very small and, in my opinion, favors the Mac. My intel processor based Macbook Pro is $2300 and it compares favorably with the best Windows laptop in terms of speed, performance, and features. It comes with superb bundled in system software that is as good or better than anything Windows can offer. For example, iPhoto (Image), iTunes (Music), Safari (browser), iMovie, iDVD, iChat, Chess, Front Row, Time Machine, Image Capture, and Garageband are bundled with all Macs. Time Machine is the best backup program there is.

    The iWork package of Pages, Numbers, and Keynote is now a mature package of wordprocessor, spreadsheet, and presentation applications that are as good as Microsoft Office. Of course, because the rest of the world uses Microsoft Office, I must buy and use the latest version of Word, Excel, and Powerpoint. However, I must say that all the Microsoft programs reached their peak in 2004 and all subsequent versions have been worse in terms of performance, ease of use, and features whereas the iWork programs are getting better and better with each subsequent version so that they are equal or will exceed the Microsoft Office.

    In my area of work (which is science and internet communication) the range and quality of Mac software is as good or better than Windows. Some of my programs are of course both Mac and Windows. For example, I use Adobe Acrobat a lot (for pdf files). I have Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator but seldom use these programs. I use Endnotes for my reference database. I use Skype for telephone and messaging. I use Filemaker as my main database program for all my letter writing. I use Fasttrack as my main project management program. I use Turbotax for taxes. Finally, for web browsing, I use Flock which is based on Firefox.

    I use a number of Mac-only applications that is not available for Windows:

    • Appleworks. Great wordprocessor, spreadsheet, drawing program.
    • Disk Warrior. This is the best disc directory repair program.
    • Dupe Guru. This programs finds duplicates files on your disc.
    • Graphic Converter. This is the best graphic converter program.
    • iPulse. This displays all the essential information about my Mac.
    • Journier. This is the best word processing journal/diary program.
    • OmniGraffle. This is the best object-oriented drawing program.
    • Papers. This is the best reprint database program.
    • Photobooth. This program takes your picture (for passports, etc.)
    • Profcast. This program records my lectures with slides into a movie.
    • SnapNDrag. This allows me to make jpeg pictures of anything.
    • SuperDuper! This is the best disc mirroring program.
    • Tex-Edit Plus. This is the best Mac plain text processing program.
    • Yojimbo. This is the everything database program for all types of info.

    These inavailability of these programs would make me very reluctant to move to Windows.

    Wise.

  5. #25
    Can anyone recommend a retailer that sells refurbished iMacs?

  6. #26
    Wise: your years of experience as a Mac user speaks volumes, thanks!

    ZDNet on April 16, 2009 reported "Researchers Find Signs of Zombie Macs." The article is written by Ryan Naraine who is a security evangelist for Kaspersky Lab. The researchers are from Symantec, which makes an antivirus for Macs.

    I read the article and it is extraordinarily vague. It doesn't even really say that there is a botnet. What they are saying is that there is a virus hidden in a copy of iWork ’09 that was put up on the pirate bulletin board. In order to get this virus you have to go to a pirate bulletin board and download an illegal copy of iWork ’09. By downloading this software you need to understand that this is unethical, immoral and illegal. How safe can anyone expect this pirated copy of iWork ’09 to be? To paraphrase, when you download from dogs you are going to get fleas. The researchers from Symantec say they found malware that was designed to create a botnet (to learn more you have to subscribe to the virus bulletin board). What's unclear is if they really found a botnet. All they really found is a blog entry that claims to have found a botnet. By the way, this blog entry is three months old. They don't claim that they actually observed the botnet in action. This really looks like an isolated incident (it was well publicized) and you have to work pretty hard to get this virus on peoples machine. I don't think this article demonstrates there is a widespread problem of viruses or signs of zombie Macs. However, I am sure the folks at Symantec or Kaspersky would love it if you were to buy their software. I am not convinced that Macs are as insecure as Windows. Most bad guys attack Windows because they are 90% of the market.

    Right now I don't think it's time to go out and get a antivirus for your Mac.
    Last edited by PN; 05-07-2009 at 12:50 AM.
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
    --General George Patton

    Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
    ––Paul Nussbaum
    usc87.blogspot.com

  7. #27
    Senior Member smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    2,177
    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    Can anyone recommend a retailer that sells refurbished iMacs?
    Steven, Apple sells their own refurbished products right on the Apple Store website. Here is the link for refurbished iMacs;

    http://store.apple.com/us/browse/hom...ac?mco=MTE3NjY

  8. #28
    I've also discovered Psystar computers -- one of the few mac clones available.

  9. #29
    I would be VERY wary of buying from Psystar or other "clone" Mac sellers. What they do is very probably illegal (Psystar and Apple are fighting it out in the courts right now, Apple seems to be winning) and if the company folds you may be left with a machine and no support available.

    In any case, part of what makes Mac computers so great is that everything works together, including the support one the phone and that available when you take your machine to an Apple store or reseller (depending on which country you're in). None of that would be available with a clone, legal or not.

    I recommend the online Apple refurb store another person pointed out - go to http://store.apple.com/ and on the end put the 2 letters that are your country's code for web and email addresses eg:
    http://store.apple.com/uk - for the UK
    http://store.apple.com/us - for the USA
    http://store.apple.com/au - for Australia
    http://store.apple.com/ca - for Canada
    Then look for the box marked "Special Deals", it seems to be near the bottom usually. Click on the heading and it will show you all the refurb mobels available. These come with the standard warranty that all Apple products come with, and you can buy AppleCare for them the same as for any new computer.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by PN View Post
    Wise: your years of experience as a Mac user speaks volumes, thanks!

    ZDNet on April 16, 2009 reported "Researchers Find Signs of Zombie Macs." The article is written by Ryan Naraine who is a security evangelist for Kaspersky Lab. The researchers are from Symantec, which makes an antivirus for Macs.

    I read the article and it is extraordinarily vague. It doesn't even really say that there is a botnet. What they are saying is that there is a virus hidden in a copy of iWork ’09 that was put up on the pirate bulletin board. In order to get this virus you have to go to a pirate bulletin board and download an illegal copy of iWork ’09. By downloading this software you need to understand that this is unethical, immoral and illegal. How safe can anyone expect this pirated copy of iWork ’09 to be? To paraphrase, when you download from dogs you are going to get fleas. The researchers from Symantec say they found malware that was designed to create a botnet (to learn more you have to subscribe to the virus bulletin board). What's unclear is if they really found a botnet. All they really found is a blog entry that claims to have found a botnet. By the way, this blog entry is three months old. They don't claim that they actually observed the botnet in action. This really looks like an isolated incident (it was well publicized) and you have to work pretty hard to get this virus on peoples machine. I don't think this article demonstrates there is a widespread problem of viruses or signs of zombie Macs. However, I am sure the folks at Symantec or Kaspersky would love it if you were to buy their software. I am not convinced that Macs are as insecure as Windows. Most bad guys attack Windows because they are 90% of the market.

    Right now I don't think it's time to go out and get a antivirus for your Mac.
    If there were a good Mac anti-virus program, I think that I would probably buy it. For years, I used Norton, because I use Microsoft programs and documents in a university environment that is festering with Windows malware. However, shortly after 2006, I stopped upgrading it because I seldom used Norton. Norton is good for guarding against Windows malware, so that I do not pass it on to other Window users, not because it gets rid of viruses that affect my Mac (Source)

    McAfee (Source) and Intego [source]http://antivirus.about.com/od/antivirussoftwarereviews/fr/virusbarrier.htm[source] both offer virus-scan programs for the Mac. They say that Intego is better but I am not sure how much better. It is about 3 times more expensive than the McAfee which is about $25. Norton costs about $71.

    Wise.

Similar Threads

  1. new power book
    By metronycguy in forum Computers
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 02-15-2006, 12:46 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-29-2004, 09:06 AM
  3. Apple's New IMac Displays Minimalism
    By Max in forum Computers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-31-2004, 08:44 PM
  4. New iMac -- all screen, no box
    By Jeff in forum Computers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-31-2004, 08:42 PM
  5. Internet images with iMac
    By SCI-Nurse in forum Computers
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-12-2004, 11:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •