Page 41 of 49 FirstFirst ... 31323334353637383940414243444546474849 LastLast
Results 401 to 410 of 481

Thread: Recipes for avoiding UTI's

  1. #401
    I was wondering if anybody is trying or have tried http://www.pro-stat.com/uti-stat.asp UTI-Stat® with Proantinox?

    Each one ounce (30 ml) serving of UTI-Stat® with Proantinox® provides as much cranberry proanthocyanidins as approximately five 450 mg cranberry tablets (equivalent to 16 eight oz glasses of cranberry juice cocktail).
    I do take cranmagic every day as a preventative, but thought about adding this in. Also
    C4 incomplete since 1985

  2. #402
    Senior Member Axle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    565
    My first post. Thanks to Bob Clark and everyone else here who has posted so much valuable information. I have a question and I apologize if it's been asked before because it is a rather obvious one. Rather than a clean technique why not use a sterile technique? The best one I can see is a closed system hydrophilic cath with an introducer tip. Sterility is guaranteed and it works just as well on the road as in the home. Hands never touch the catheter or the meatus and the catheter never touches the meatus or the first 1/2 inch of the urethra. The result is most bacteria is bypassed. But there is still one potential problem.

    Bacteria may reside in the urethra beyond the first 1/2 inch and the catheter may push that bacteria into the bladder. In which case, it makes sense to periodically wash the urethra to kill and/or flush out bacteria. But why H2O2? Is it because H2O2 fizzing action strips bacteria off the urethra wall? I am a bit concerned that H2O2 is so harsh that it can ruin your pants zipper. But then again, water is harmless to us and look what it does to iron. Maybe H2O2 is fine. I just don't know for sure. Could saline or any other solutions be just as effective?

  3. #403
    Senior Member Axle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    565
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    While Methenamine drugs (Hiprex, Urex, Mandelamine, Uroqid) are popular drugs to prevent UTIs, scientific studies show that they don't have a higher rate of UTI reduction compared to placebos.

    (KLD)
    Isn't this essentially formaldehyde? Not sure I want that in my body on a regular basis.

  4. #404
    Quote Originally Posted by Axle View Post
    My first post. Thanks to Bob Clark and everyone else here who has posted so much valuable information. I have a question and I apologize if it's been asked before because it is a rather obvious one. Rather than a clean technique why not use a sterile technique? The best one I can see is a closed system hydrophilic cath with an introducer tip. Sterility is guaranteed and it works just as well on the road as in the home. Hands never touch the catheter or the meatus and the catheter never touches the meatus or the first 1/2 inch of the urethra. The result is most bacteria is bypassed. But there is still one potential problem.

    Bacteria may reside in the urethra beyond the first 1/2 inch and the catheter may push that bacteria into the bladder. In which case, it makes sense to periodically wash the urethra to kill and/or flush out bacteria. But why H2O2? Is it because H2O2 fizzing action strips bacteria off the urethra wall? I am a bit concerned that H2O2 is so harsh that it can ruin your pants zipper. But then again, water is harmless to us and look what it does to iron. Maybe H2O2 is fine. I just don't know for sure. Could saline or any other solutions be just as effective?
    Many people on Care Cure Community do use these closed catheter systems.

    If I were trying to wash the urethra, as you say, I would use Vetericyn or Vetericyn VF.

    All the best,
    GJ

  5. #405
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    If I were trying to wash the urethra, as you say, I would use Vetericyn or Vetericyn VF.

    GJ
    A key concern, especially in the winter, is that if Vetericyn or Vetericyn VF have been frozen at some point in the shipping process it is useless.

    I posted about this concern and never received a satisfactory answer as to either

    (1) a test the user can perform to check that Vetericyn is active, or

    (2) even some reasonable explanation for why the manufacturer does not package these items with temperature warning strips.

    No matter how effective Vetericyn might be when it has never been frozen, there is no way to know if one is using effective Vetericyn or just water.

    Moreover, if the Vetericyn is just water, then after a while I would expect it could become contaminated over time with various microbes once opened, so it would actually be worse than using nothing at that point.

  6. #406
    Quote Originally Posted by xsfxsf View Post
    A key concern, especially in the winter, is that if Vetericyn or Vetericyn VF have been frozen at some point in the shipping process it is useless.

    I posted about this concern and never received a satisfactory answer as to either

    (1) a test the user can perform to check that Vetericyn is active, or

    (2) even some reasonable explanation for why the manufacturer does not package these items with temperature warning strips.

    No matter how effective Vetericyn might be when it has never been frozen, there is no way to know if one is using effective Vetericyn or just water.

    Moreover, if the Vetericyn is just water, then after a while I would expect it could become contaminated over time with various microbes once opened, so it would actually be worse than using nothing at that point.
    I absolutely agree with your points (1) and (2). Some on line retailers have become aware of this problem and will not ship if there is an up coming freezing storm forecast. I have gotten into the habit of purchasing the amount of Vetericyn I estimate I will need over the winter months in late fall to avoid any possibilities of freezing. It is also a good idea to get into the habit of asking your vendor what the expiration date is of the stock they are selling. Ideally, the expiration date of stock on hand should be 16-18 months from the time of purchase.

    All the best,
    GJ

  7. #407
    Senior Member Axle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    565
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Many people on Care Cure Community do use these closed catheter systems.

    If I were trying to wash the urethra, as you say, I would use Vetericyn or Vetericyn VF.

    All the best,
    GJ
    Thanks. I may try that. I have read people saying that they have ordered the Vetericyn plus syringes. Is there a kit or do you have to order Vetericyn, syringes, and syringe attachments (tubing?) separately?

  8. #408
    Quote Originally Posted by Axle View Post
    Thanks. I may try that. I have read people saying that they have ordered the Vetericyn plus syringes. Is there a kit or do you have to order Vetericyn, syringes, and syringe attachments (tubing?) separately?
    There are a couple ways to go about washing the urethra with Vetericyn. You could use a catheter tipped syringe (like the one below) filled with Vetericyn and insert the cath tip into the penis and squirt Vetericyn to wash the first inch (approximate) of the urethra. I believe some here use a catheter attached to a catheter tipped syringe filled with Vetericyn, insert the catheter into the full length of the urethra, while depressing the plunger on the syringe, which bathes the entire length of the urethra in Vetericyn.

    Vetericyn can be purchased on line or locally from many pet supply outlets. Catheter tipped syringes can purchased from some local pharmacies, medical supply stores or online.

    All the best,
    GJ

  9. #409
    Senior Member Axle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    565
    I am not hear to second guess everyone. I trust that people have done their homework. But I do need to ask questions before injecting chemicals into my bladder.

    Someone on a different site told me that he flushes his bladder with 60 CCs of distilled water and it keeps him free of UTIs. This may not get rid of a UTI but it may prevent one.

    Any experiences with this?

  10. #410
    Quote Originally Posted by Axle View Post
    I am not hear to second guess everyone. I trust that people have done their homework. But I do need to ask questions before injecting chemicals into my bladder.

    Someone on a different site told me that he flushes his bladder with 60 CCs of distilled water and it keeps him free of UTIs. This may not get rid of a UTI but it may prevent one.

    Any experiences with this?
    I do not have any experience with distilled water bladder flushes preventing urinary tract infections. I have my doubts that distilled water has any preventative properties, especially since it would not stay sterile once a purchased bottle is opened or if you make your own, once it is older than just a few hours. Distilled water bladder flushes may help to clear sediment out of a catheter, but since the pH of distilled water may not be neutral, it would be better practice to use sterile normal saline for this purpose. The way most of use Vetericyn is not a flush. We instill Vetericyn into the bladder and retain it in the bladder for a selected period of time.

    Vetericyn (Microcyn, Puracyn, and Dermacyn) is pH neutral. Vetericyn is a proprietary formulation of oxychlorine compounds based upon the Microcyn® Technology platform. Vetericyn’s base ingredient, oxychlorine, is similar to that produced by healthy cells in the body. The ingredients in Vetericyn are Electrolyzed Water (H2OSodium Chloride (NaCISodium Hypochlorite (NaOCI& Hypochlorous Acid (HOCI)(0.003%).
    Vetericyn was originally developed for wound treatment. It is not an antibiotic. It may more properly be characterized as an antiseptic. Vetericyn has a safety profile comparable to saline. It is non-toxic and non-irritating while safe to use around eyes, nose and mouth. It contains no steroids or antibiotics and can be easily applied with no mixing -insing after use is not required. It is used in animals and humans. (Dim Gray wording is from the Vetercyn website - http://vetericyn.com/technology/faq.php)

    If distilled water could prevent urinary tract infections, all of us would be using it instead of Vetericyn for no other reason than cost. Vetericyn costs about $2.00 per ounce or one 30cc instillation. Medical grade sterile distilled water costs about $.69 per ounce and distilled water you buy at the grocery store in a gallon jug costs about $.05 per ounce. Personally, I feel there is little or no risk with using Vetericyn, but there is a big risk with using distilled water if your are trying to prevent urinary tract infections.

    All the best,
    GJ

Similar Threads

  1. Ongoing UTIs - Spinewire nurse?
    By Brinda41 in forum Care
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-24-2009, 11:21 PM
  2. vasectomy due to chronic uti's ?
    By kiwidebs in forum Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-04-2007, 06:25 PM
  3. is there a vaccine for UTIs?
    By manouli in forum Health & Science News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-29-2006, 11:33 AM
  4. UTIs
    By giambjj in forum Care
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-21-2005, 12:13 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-16-2003, 09:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •