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Thread: Tips For Best Press Coffee

  1. #1
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    Tips For Best Press Coffee

    If you're willing to spend a few minutes and make slightly more effort with its preparation, your (French) press coffee can be much better.

    Firstly, the total amout of brewing thme is cued to the grind of the coffee; if it's ground coarse it must brew longer and vise versa. It's best to go with a fairly fine grind for fuller extraction of your coffee's flavor but too fine will result in more dregs in your cup(s). Experiment.

    Most important for coffee's quality is that the heat of the brewing water be kept high throughout the brew time. This can be done in a few ways:

    1. Preheat the press body and cap/plunger unit. You can do this by keeping them in the pot you boil the water in but be sure they are both very clean before you do this or the rancidified oils left in them will carry over into your new brew. A pot large enough to accommodate the press body lying on its side is indicated. Be sure to use a glove or towel when removing the press from the pot as it will be hot. Put ground coffee into the press and add boiling water.

    2. You should stir down the brew after one minute (sixty seconds) so you can put the cap/plunger unit back in boiling water while you keep the press body hot by wrapping it in a towel. Take care to stretch the towel over the top of the press to keep it out of the brewing coffee and wrap the rest of the towel around the press.

    3. Remove towel and stir down brew after a minute using a preheated spoon.

    4. Insert cap/plunger unit and rewrap press with towel.

    5. Let brew another four minutes (more or less depending on the grind). In the last minute slowly drpress the plunger.

    6. Decant slowly watching for dregs as you might want to leave most of them behind.

    7. Enjoy.

    Note: All press coffee will have some dregs in it which will tend to settle out to the bottom of your cup. This is natural and will vary with the coarseness/fineness of the grind. The dregs will continue to brew into your cup as they sit so you may want to either add sweetener or drink the coffee in a reasonable time.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  2. #2
    Thanks for the great information Juke_spin. I've always preferred the coarser grind, but apparently that isn't the best way to get quality flavor, so I'll be sure to try a finer grind. Is there anyway to get a finer grind with less dregs?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by layla17
    Thanks for the great information Juke_spin. I've always preferred the coarser grind, but apparently that isn't the best way to get quality flavor, so I'll be sure to try a finer grind. Is there anyway to get a finer grind with less dregs?
    Medium fine poured slowly to leave most dregs behind will eliminate most. If you find you're getting too bitter a brew with a five minute (total) brew time try four, etc.. If you want clear brew consider a melitta or other filter treatment of the post pressed coffee. I have done this a few times but my present routine eliminates so much of the dregs it's not worth the extra effort and expense to get the last of them out.

    Oh, btw, you're welcome.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  4. #4
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    I'm like Pavlov's dog when it comes to good coffee.......drool, drool.....

  5. #5
    i was always told 4 minutes with the very course grind, the biggest the big commercial grinders can go.
    people who are more into coffee say to go a bit less coarse and brew for 3 minutes and it will be better
    cauda equina

  6. #6
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    I use the five minute time based on experimentation/experience. There is the minute pre stirdown to consider but then there's the fact that I'm going with a fairly fine grind. Maybe if your coffee's not so good it's imporved by a short brewing time.

    Quote Originally Posted by metronycguy
    i was always told 4 minutes with the very course grind, the biggest the big commercial grinders can go.
    people who are more into coffee say to go a bit less coarse and brew for 3 minutes and it will be better
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  7. #7
    I haven o perfected the good brew yet. i lvoe french vanilla....is it worse to get the beans pre-ground?
    Life Life to the Fullest
    <3 the beach<3swimsuits

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    Nice move having oatmeal with that coffee. Coffee aficionados (read "snobs") frown on "flavored" coffees. Count me in. If you've got a high quality varietal you won't/don't need any additioanl flavoring. In fact adding anything other than sweetener is masking the excellence of the (otherwise) pristine brew. I hold out for the exception of a quality creamer but a true purist would frown on that as well.

    Welcome to the CCCC (CareCure CoffeeCorner) Glamgurl.
    Quote Originally Posted by glamgurl36
    I haven o perfected the good brew yet. i lvoe french vanilla....is it worse to get the beans pre-ground?
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  9. #9
    Even after experimenting with french press and a whole gamut of percolator-style coffee makers, I still prefer the taste of coffee brewed from a manual coffee cone. I find it gives the richest aroma and flavor and it's quite easy to make just coffee-for-one.

    Next time I have company over, though, I'll be trying out your french press technique, Juke.
    Daniel

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc
    Even after experimenting with french press and a whole gamut of percolator-style coffee makers, I still prefer the taste of coffee brewed from a manual coffee cone. I find it gives the richest aroma and flavor and it's quite easy to make just coffee-for-one.

    Next time I have company over, though, I'll be trying out your french press technique, Juke.
    wow , i am surprised. have you ever gone into a coffee house where they serve French press by the carafe and have it there?in a coffee house the will have everything set to perfection, grounds, quantity per up cop and usually give you a timer of tell you when the 3 to 4 minutes is up.
    one of the biggest mistakes in being french press is the wrong amount of coffee . it is one scoop be 4 oz cup. . a normal large French press makes 32 oz, so it is 8 scoops. the scoops should be 1 and 1/2 tbls . at least that is the ones that bodum packages with their french press.
    i have a long handed scoop from sbucks it i 2tbls, this one always threw me off in making proper coffee,
    cauda equina

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