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Thread: How to make Tomago....

  1. #1
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    How to make Tomago....

    ...for sushi.

    This recipe is submitted by someone who admits that the tomago is traditionally made in a square or rectangular tomago pan. Although it is in no way needed, tomago pans are available from Amazon for $20.

    Tamago is the Japanese name for a sweet egg omelet. This omelet can be used in maki and on nigiri sushi. The only problem is that the tamago is so good that once you try some, there might not be any left to make sushi with! This isn’t exactly a traditional recipe. Instead, this is how my mom used to always make it, so it might be a little different than what you find in sushi restaurants. Also, *real* tamago is made using a small square pan. I don’t have one, and most of you probably don’t either, so while this may not look quite like tamago that you eat at a sushi restaurant, it still tastes good! Makes 1 omelet.Ingredients
    • 2 eggs (use of cage-free eggs will produce tomago sheet-omlettes much tastier than those made from egg factory eggs)
    • 1 tbsp sugar
    • 1/2 tsp shoyu
    Cooking Directions
    1. Crack the eggs into a bowl, wash your hands.
    2. Using a whisk or a fork, whisk the eggs until smooth.
    3. Stir in the sugar and shoyu, stirring until thoroughly mixed in.
    4. Heat a frying pan at medium heat.
    5. Melt about ½ tbsp butter in the pan, spreading it so the bottom of the pan is completely covered.
    6. Pour the egg mix into the pan.
    7. When the egg looks opaque and you can get a spatula under it without tearing the omelet, flip the omelet.
    8. When the omelet is coked through (you can lift the omelet with the spatula to check underneath), remove the omelet from the pan.
    9. Slice into thin strips. The width of these strips depends on what you are using the tamago for – for tamago nigiri, cut them into 1.5�? x 2.5�? strips, to use in maki cut into 1 cm strips.
    Serving Size: 1 omelet
    • Calories:190
    • Fat: 10g, 15% DV
    • Saturated Fat: 3g, 15% DV
    • Cholesterol: 422mg, 141% DV
    • Sodium: 263mg 11% DV
    • Total Carbohydrates: 13g, 4% DV
    • Dietary Fiber: 0g, 0% DV
    • Sugars: 13g
    • Protein: 12g, 25% DV
    • Vitamin A: 10%
    • Vitamin C: 0%
    • Calcium: 6%
    • Iron: 10%
    • Magnesium: 4%
    • Potassium: 4%
    Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. These values are only estimates based on the individual ingredients, and not meant to replace the advice of a medical professional.
    http://sushiday.com/archives/2006/11...o-make-tamago/
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  2. #2
    My father always loved having sushi and sashimi at home. We'd make tamago out of egg, soy sauce, mirin, hondashi and sugar.
    Daniel

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc
    My father always loved having sushi and sashimi at home. We'd make tamago out of egg, soy sauce, mirin, hondashi and sugar.
    So Dan, with all that sushi in you growing up years, have you carried the habit of eating it into your adult life?
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Juke_spin
    So Dan, with all that sushi in you growing up years, have you carried the habit of eating it into your adult life?
    Come to think of it, I had some sushi today at Sunday brunch. Yup, still love sushi.

    I had opportunity to sample foods from many cultures in my growing up years. Indeed, I love many different kinds of foods (a bit too much). It's difficult (but not impossible) to find good Japanese food here.

    I love variety and I love to cook, so I try to incorporate different ingredients in my own cooking. I am embarrassed to admit how many kitchen utensils and appliances I've collected! I have a tamago pan, bamboo rollers, and sushi-nori in the pantry. I often go to a local fish specialty market to see the "catch of the day" and when available, I obtain fresh fish and serve sashimi or nigiri. I keep some unagi in the freezer, 20# sacks of rice in the garage, and gallon jugs of the dark, light and all-purpose soy sauce. I make my own version of teriyaki sauce and use it often for marinating or brushing on meats. I'm always looking for the perfect condiment and have collected an assortment of asian-style sauces (sriracha, chili-garlic, spicy-black-bean, spicy bean, satay, hoisin, oyster ... hmmm ... yum). I do much of my food shopping at the asian food grocer.
    Last edited by dan_nc; 11-26-2007 at 06:00 AM.
    Daniel

  5. #5
    Holy crap, I feel inadequate. Impressive, gentlemen!

  6. #6
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    I've rarely tried to make sushi and most of my efforts have not been resounding successes. Mostly I've been discouraged by the amounts of sugar called for in the preparation of the sushi rice and haven't been very successful at making attractive, delicious and coherent sushi. They've fallen apart too often and, although they were tasty - although not delicous, like most store and sushi house purchases - a bit messier than I like. And there was all that sugar.

    But there is hope that I can eventually get a handle on this gourmet cooking, assembly and eating art. I recently got a book called The Zen of Fish (by Trevor Corson) and have so far learned a lot about the history, country origins and preparation of sushi, including that the amount of sugar used by Japanese sushi chefs is not carved in stone. In fact "the amount of sugar found in sushi rice increases as you move from Tokyo toward Kyoto; some Tokyo sushi masters use very little sugar in preparing their sushi rice and the most closly guarded secret in most sushi houses is the ratio of salt to vinegar used in the preparation of their sushi rice." The above paraphrase is less surprising when you learn that in traditional sushi preparation the production of the sushi rice is regarded as of the highest importance, even more important than the quality of the fish and all other ingredients.

    Betheny, as you can see, Dan is impressive; I'm just open to new dietary/culinary experiences and curious enough to get and read a book about sushi.


    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc
    Come to think of it, I had some sushi today at Sunday brunch. Yup, still love sushi.

    I had opportunity to sample foods from many cultures in my growing up years. Indeed, I love many different kinds of foods (a bit too much). It's difficult (but not impossible) to find good Japanese food here.

    I love variety and I love to cook, so I try to incorporate different ingredients in my own cooking. I am embarrassed to admit how many kitchen utensils and appliances I've collected! I have a tamago pan, bamboo rollers, and sushi-nori in the pantry. I often go to a local fish specialty market to see the "catch of the day" and when available, I obtain fresh fish and serve sashimi or nigiri. I keep some unagi in the freezer, 20# sacks of rice in the garage, and gallon jugs of the dark, light and all-purpose soy sauce. I make my own version of teriyaki sauce and use it often for marinating or brushing on meats. I'm always looking for the perfect condiment and have collected an assortment of asian-style sauces (sriracha, chili-garlic, spicy-black-bean, spicy bean, satay, hoisin, oyster ... hmmm ... yum). I do much of my food shopping at the asian food grocer.
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 11-26-2007 at 05:26 PM.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Juke_spin
    Betheny, as you can see, Dan is impressive; I'm just open to new dietary/culinary experiences and curious enough to get and read a book about sushi.
    Steve, my friends have had to suffer quite a few of my culinary catastrophes and I'm sure very few of them would consider me impressive.

    My dad always stressed that the appearance of the food is just as important as its taste. When I would make stir-fry, he would critique my cutting techniques and explain that the ingredients need to be cut in complementary shapes and sizes. For instance, If my chunks of meat were not proportional to the chunks of peppers or onions, the dish would not be considered appealing.

    I do love food and experimenting with different tastes and textures. I usually start with a mental "taste" of what the food ought to taste like, and I start adding ingredients or different cooking processes to try to match that mental "taste." I don't do a lot of actual measuring and do most of my cooking by intuition.

    With cooking, it's important to have a mental image of the end-result. I think the key to making sushi rice is using the right kind of rice (the sticky medium grained variety). I believe I have same kind of inexpensive rice cooker found in most chinese households here in US (tatung brand). I use the "one knuckle" technique as far as how much water to add to the dry rice. When it comes time to add the sugar/vinegar/salt mixture, it's important to take into account the texture of the cooked rice (which may be slightly more dry or moist). Add the mixture and fold gently without breaking too many grains. You do not want it to turn to mush or look like mochi. The resulting sushi-rice should have just enough stickiness to not fall apart when you gently press it into shape. It should not be too sweet or too sour. It should have just enough gloss to give visual appeal.
    Daniel

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by edu1
    Hi friend...

    I made tomago. Its really Yummyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy.

    Thanx for such a tasty receipe.
    You're welcome. Did you use it for sushi or....?
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

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