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Thread: TiLite 2GX and Aero X Folding Frames

  1. #1

    TiLite 2GX and Aero X Folding Frames

    Looks like TiLite is going to be introducing two new folding frame models at Medtrade on Tuesday. They just popped up on the website sometime today. The 2GX is constructed from titanium and the AeroX out of aluminum.

    Both have adjustable COG and rear STF height and are available in swingway or fixed front frame versions.



    Here is a link to the 2GX order form.

    http://www.tilite.com/pdf/TiLite_2GX.pdf

  2. #2
    ive just spent the last 10 minutes on the tilite website, but as much as id like to, i dont think ill be able to add either to my shortlist - i cant get a fixed front frame with taper, and i dont think i can handle that much space to wobble around in. they look good though, and i like the cog adjustment

  3. #3

    TiLite 2GX and Aero X Folding Frames--2GX Pics

    A veteran I have been working with has been using a TiLite SX (folding frame/swingaway front riggings). He has been waiting for over a year to see if his next wheelchair will be TiLite's successor to the SX--the 2GX. Last week the TiLite "demo truck" rolled into Cleveland and is parked somewhere in the Greater Cleveland area until the end of next week My local TiLite rep stopped by the other day. I asked they had a 2GX in the truck. He checked, and was happy to oblige.

    This is a demo 17x16 2GX Titanium with 80 degree swing in/swing out front riggings. Other notable options include 24x1 Spinergy LX wheels with titanium handrims, Unilock wheel locks set for pull to lock, and 5x1 billet aluminum casters with soft roll tires.

    TiLite even decked this one out with a color scheme to commemorate the 10-0 Buckeyes of The Ohio State University who are ranked as the top college football team in the nation.


    Swing in/swing out front riggings are light and lock securely in place...


    It also approaches the theoretical limit for how narrow a folding chair will fold....

    The front caster barrels have "infinite" fore/aft adjustability since both clamp to the side frame. To keep the caster barrel clamps from rotating on round tubing, the tubing transitions from a round to retangular shape at the end of the frame.


    Like the caster barrels, the axle sleeve mounting bracket also clamps onto the frame and can be moved fore/aft fairly easily. TiLte terms the use of clamps instead of bolts the "Tru-Fit component system".

    The axle sleeve mounting bracket has notches on the inner portion to secure the axle sleeve clamp at the desired rear STF height.



    This is probably the most adjustable folding frame ultralightweight wheelchair on the market today. Based on my first impression, however, that may not necessarily be a good thing. With the armrests, wheels, and front riggings removed, the 17x16 2GX felt much heavier than a 19x16 TX I ordered for a veteran last year. Much of the weight difference appears to be due to the heavier fork & axle sleeve mounting hardware (the tubular armrest brackets also contribute).

    TiLite's own weight specs for their folding models bear this out..

    - 2GX titanium folder with swingaway front riggings = 18.4 lbs.

    - Aero X aluminum folder with swingaway front riggings = 18.4 lbs.

    - TX titanium folder with fixed front frame = 12.3 lbs.

    - SX titanium folder with swingaway front riggings = 16.4 lbs.

    If you need swingaway front riggings, is there any advantage getting the titanium 2GX (MSRP=$2995) instead of an Aero X (MSRP=$1995) which is identical in every respect except for the aluminum frame? With a soft roll caster to dampen vibration, it would not appear there much of an advantage.

    Is there any advantage to getting the 2GX instead of the older SX titanium ($MSRP=$2895). Both the overall width and folded width of the 2GX are narrower than the SX. If TiLite's claim that the Tru-Fit component system will extend the life of the chair holds true, the additional $100 and 2 extra lbs. may be worth it.

    Those end users looking to upgrade from their current folding frame wheelchair (an Invacare MVP or Quickie2) may want to contemplate whether they really need the ability to adjust their rear STF height and if they can find a way to manage transfers without removing the front riggings. If so, the slightly pricier TiLite TX ($MSRP=$3095) would be the best bet.

    Last edited by SCI_OTR; 11-06-2007 at 07:18 PM.

  4. #4
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    Question Tilite 2GX or what"

    Is this 2GX the chair for me? And what do I need to pay attention to when ordering -angles, hts, wheels, accessories, that kind of thing? This is my first chair and I want to get it right.

    I have HSP and still walking, but as the spasticity in my legs increases walking becomes more difficult, and balance already is an issue. My occupational therapist is not familiar with HSP and she doesn't know what's ahead for me, so it's up to me to tell her what she needs to know re getting the right chair.

    Here's what I'm thinking . . . A folding chair, so that I can store it and so that I can pick it up with one hand while I hold on to something with the other. (I don't think it's possible that I'll be able to sit and reach way down without falling over. I drive a Honda Element with the suicide doors.) An Ultra Lightweight because I'm only 5'2" and not that strong with one arm. I'm looking for something that's close to a rigid chair as possible so I can take it out and run the seawall. (I'm hoping to get a lot more active with the chair.) Swing-away footrests and swing-up armrests, so that I can stand using the armsrests to prop me up.

    I'm also thinking Magic Wheels because I travel a lot on my own and live where everything is up the hill. I'd probably buy some regular wheels too, if they're not too expensive to have as extras.

    As for the insurance coverage, I'm hopeful. I'm going for the best chair there is that will fill my needs the best.
    Last edited by Funny Walker; 01-07-2009 at 09:14 PM.

  5. #5
    In my experience with folding wheelchairs, they are heavy to lift over your head with one arm. If you drive, then I think you'll be better off with a really ultralight wheelchair. How much do you have to spend?

    Quote Originally Posted by Funny Walker View Post
    Is this 2GX the chair for me? And what do I need to pay attention to when ordering -angles, hts, wheels, accessories, that kind of thing? This is my first chair and I want to get it right.

    I have HSP and still walking, but as the spasticity in my legs increases walking becomes more difficult, and balance already is an issue. My occupational therapist is not familiar with HSP and she doesn't know what's ahead for me, so it's up to me to tell her what she needs to know re getting the right chair.

    Here's what I'm thinking . . . A folding chair, so that I can store it and so that I can pick it up with one hand while I hold on to something with the other. (I don't think it's possible that I'll be able to sit and reach way down without falling over. I drive a Hona Element with the suicide doors.) An Ultra Lightweight because I'm only 5'2" and not that strong with one arm. I'm looking for something that's close to a rigid chair as possible so I can take it out and run the seawall. (I'm hoping to get a lot more active with the chair.) Swing-away footrests and swing-up armrests, so that I can stand using the armsrests to prop me up.

    I'm also thinking Magic Wheels because I travel a lot on my own and live where everything is up the hill. I'd probably buy some regular wheels too, if they're not too expensive to have as extras.

    As for the insurance coverage, I'm hopeful. I'm going for the best chair there is that will fill my needs the best.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fubar View Post
    In my experience with folding wheelchairs, they are heavy to lift over your head with one arm. If you drive, then I think you'll be better off with a really ultralight wheelchair. How much do you have to spend?
    Hi Fubar, thanks for your feedback.

    I won't be lifting the chair over my head. I'll be standing inside the driver's door and hanging onto the seat with my left hand while I lift the chair into the car with my right hand. I'll post a pic of the Element. (The rear seats fold up out of the way.)

    As for money, the insurance does 80% if they approve of the chair so I'm going for the best suited to my needs.

    Because I'll need the swing away footrests and I won't be able to bend over without falling -to do the wheels- the rigid is out. From my few days of research this seems to be the lightest of the folding.

  7. #7
    I drive a Chevy Colorado with the same door set up as your Honda. I transfer into the driver's seat and reach out to fold my GTX with one hand, while holding on with the other hand to keep from falling out. Then I place the casters on the rear door sill then grab the frame down tube and lever/roll the folded chair into the back seat.

    Hard to describe, but it really is quick and easy and you don't have to break your chair down.

    A light weight chair makes the whole process MUCH easier.

    You may want to check out the GTX specs on www.sunrisemedical.com I use the fixed front end, but their swing away front end model is pretty light also.

    GTX SA: 17.6 pounds without rear wheels, 27.3 pounds with rear wheels.

    The 2 biggest advantages the GTX has are, when unfolded it really does lock out and feel like a ridgid. The 2nd is the versatility. It folds in the traditional way, or you can leave the frame unfolded and the back folds forward, like a ridgid. Or you can do BOTH!! With the right technique, it can be stored in virtually any vehicle in a space smaller than either traditional folders or ridgid chairs.

    Good Luck...

    Joe

  8. #8
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    Thanks hawkeyes, this is exactly the information I'm looking for.

  9. #9
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    I'm back and still searching for the right chair. Being that I need a foldable chair with flip up feet (not swing-away) that is as light and rigid as possible, it looks like a tilite is the best option, with the flip up feet as shown.


    This photo is out of their options brochure and is listed a footrest option for the folding chair. It looks like the bar would give the chair a lot of rigidity and still allow me to stand once the footrests are up. Seems to be a perfect match. But . . . how in the world, if this is truly for a foldable chair -as they claim- how do you fold it with that bar running side to side?

    Anyone know or care to guess?

    Can anyone advise me how to paste a jpg here?
    Last edited by Funny Walker; 03-19-2009 at 12:51 PM.

  10. #10
    FW,

    My GTX has flip up foot plates. They connect when down with a spring loaded button.

    Joe

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