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Thread: Indorenate Improves Motor Function in Rats with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #1

    Indorenate Improves Motor Function in Rats with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Indorenate = what is it? new medication? who knows more?






    Indorenate Improves Motor Function in Rats with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Abstract:

    : 

    The effect of indorenate (5-methoxytryptamine, β-methyl carboxylate hydrochloride), a 5-HT1A agonist, was investigated on the motor performance of rats with chronic spinal cord injury. Four months after a ninth thoracic vertebrae spinal cord contusion, 29 rats were randomly allocated into two groups: saline solution and indorenate-treated animals with daily doses incremented at weekly intervals. The locomotor performance of all rats was measured by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) rating scale.

    more:
    http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conten...1?crawler=true

  2. #2
    A serotonin agonist.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  3. #3
    Whoa, this came out of nowhere. Good find manouli. Sounds like it would be a good candidate for expedited human testing under the new FDA guidelines.
    Last edited by antiquity; 09-11-2007 at 09:53 PM.

  4. #4

    more info about indorenate

    here is more info about indorenate


    Attachment 17377

  5. #5
    lol rats once again, how come we never hear about monkeys? or any other animals?

  6. #6
    Here was study done with embroynic cells and serotonin agonist.
    This is a great article! I wonder what Dr. Wise thinks of this?

    http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs...2005.22.590his

    Henryk Majczyński Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Interinstitute Laboratory of Neuromuscular Plasticity, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

    Katarzyna Maleszak Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering, Interinstitute Laboratory of Neuromuscular Plasticity, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

    Anna Cabaj Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering, Interinstitute Laboratory of Neuromuscular Plasticity, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

    Urszula Sławińska, Ph.D., D.Sc. Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Interinstitute Laboratory of Neuromuscular Plasticity, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

    Recently, we demonstrated improvements in hind limb locomotor-like movements following grafting of embryonic raphe nuclei cells into the spinal cord below the level of total transection in adult rats. The purpose of the present study was to clarify whether this improvement was due to newly established serotonergic innervation between the graft and the host. Two months after intraspinal grafting of the embryonic raphe nuclei, the spinalized rats, when put on a treadmill, could be induced to walk with regular alternating hind limb movements with the plantar contact with the ground during the stance phase, and ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase of each step cycle. In the same situation the spinal rats, that did not receive the graft, were not able to initiate the dorsiflexion of the ankle joint during the swing phase and very often the dorsal surface of the foot was dragged along the ground. Intraperitoneal application of directly acting 5-HT2 antagonist Cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) impaired reversibly the hind limb locomotor-like movements in grafted rats. This impairment lasted for 2–3 h. The same procedure in control rats did not markedly alter the hind limb locomotor-like movements. The effect of Cyproheptadine in grafted rats was reversed by i.p. injections of the 5-HT2 agonist Quipazine (0.5 mg/kg). These results show that the graft-induced restitution of hind limb locomotor abilities in adult spinal rats is brought about by the new serotonergic innervation of the host spinal cord circuitry from the grafted neurons and is mediated by 5-HT2 receptors.


  7. #7
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    This appears to be a bridging strategy in the acute phase of a clean cut (transection). Don't know if this could be applied to chronic's.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Schmeky
    This appears to be a bridging strategy in the acute phase of a clean cut (transection). Don't know if this could be applied to chronic's.
    Yes re Grammy's post but manouli's post, which doesn't involve the use of ESC's, used chronic contused rats.

    There's serotonin in enteric glia cells. I wonder if that's what was responsible for the recovery seen in SCI'ed rats given enteric cell transplants in the 90's.

    http://focus.hms.harvard.edu/2005/Ma...oscience.shtml
    Last edited by antiquity; 09-12-2007 at 12:11 PM.

  9. #9
    Sorry Antiquity, I lost ya...what exactly are the "enteric" glia cells?
    What I am wondering now is the 5-HT receptor agontist going to possibly be part of a "combination" therapy? It seems to make good sense...
    I'm also wondering like Schmeky if this would be a partial application for (chronic)...

  10. #10
    Hi Grammy. Enteric glial cells are contained within the omentum which is a type of gut tissue. Omentum transplants were all the rage for treating chronic SCI in the 90's. Dr. Kao is still using this method. It didn't pan out but gut cells/tissue do release/contain serotonin.

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