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Thread: Now is an opportunity to act - paralyzed nfl player

  1. #201
    WCR,

    The reason I asked about the type of entity was because it would affect taxing. If it was a non-profit, more people would be willing to donate.

    The majority of people need ease of use to become politically active. We -- generally speaking -- need to provide that for them.

    Ease of use = participation.

    I disagree that we need people who think they may not live to see effective therapies, as that sends mixed messages. If some of us, including you, say the only obstacle is funding and others say -- How am I supposed to know? Do I look like a researcher to you? It may not happen in my lifetime, and I'm 27. -- how will that look?

    We need a consistent message.

    Steven
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  2. #202
    Quote Originally Posted by cass
    i think you put way too much emphasis on what i considered to be an observation of mine.
    You didn't just post an "observation" or bare facts. You made a value judgment based on your perception of the facts. Which is fine. It's OK for you to do that, but then it's OK for people to respond to that with their opinions about what you've said.

    i have nothing against MP or Green.
    You stated that you are "skeptical of Green's motives". That didn't sound very nice to me. Do you care to clarify that statement?

    my observation is there is too much speculation going around too soon.
    Your observation is that a great deal of speculation is going on. Your opinion is that it is too much, too soon and further, that some researchers have ulterior motives. Motivation that apparently goes beyond their stated desire to help injured people.

    I questioned you on whether you had solid facts to base your opinion on. Such as whether you had seen actual video of certain statements or whether you personally know the man you are passing judgment on. You haven't answered any of those questions. Of course, no one can make you answer anything, but even if you won't do that, I would hope that you really read my previous post and have at least considered what I said, not just dismissed it because I questioned or disagreed with you.

    C.

  3. #203
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiger Racing

    You stated that you are "skeptical of Green's motives". That didn't sound very nice to me. Do you care to clarify that statement?

    Your observation is that a great deal of speculation is going on. Your opinion is that it is too much, too soon and further, that some researchers have ulterior motives. Motivation that apparently goes beyond their stated desire to help injured people.

    I questioned you on whether you had solid facts to base your opinion on. Such as whether you had seen actual video of certain statements or whether you personally know the man you are passing judgment on. You haven't answered any of those questions. Of course, no one can make you answer anything, but even if you won't do that, I would hope that you really read my previous post and have at least considered what I said, not just dismissed it because I questioned or disagreed with you.

    C.
    C, I didn't read back far enough to get the entire story here. With that said many wonder when someone comes up in the news to be interviewed who seemingly has no knowledge of the specific case. In this case Dr Green does have knowledge of the patient and procedures it appears. But doctors from the MP often are interviewed for one very good reason, Lois Pope. Her late husband was the owner of the National Inquirer. I questioned why a reputable doc would speak to a reporter of theirs until I was informed of this. Mrs Pope has contributed a lot to research at The Miami Project and elsewhere.

    So, yea, some do wonder why sometimes certain docs talk to reporters about people or procedures that are not theirs or have knowledge about.

    A few of also wonder whatever happened to Dr Don Misner. I thought he was one of the founders of the MP and yet never see his name mentioned anymore. Dr Misner is a chair user not that that matters here..

    I don't mean to answer for anyone just bring up a few things I've learned along the way.

    Sue
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  4. #204
    Injured Bills tight end may soon walk

    And doctors said Thursday they believe he will be walking within weeks — perhaps sooner.

    "Soon ... they're going to stand him up," Dr. Barth Green told The Associated Press, shortly after discussing Everett's condition with Bills orthopedic surgeon Dr. Andrew Cappuccino. "They're very confident he'll be walking very soon ... in the next days or weeks, not months."

    ....Now that doesn't mean he'll be walking normally, but standing up and holding his own weight," Green said. "I think the future for him is very bright."


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070920/...s_everett_hurt

  5. #205
    http://www.latimes.com/features/heal...ack=crosspromo
    A chill down the spine



    The quick and cooling treatment of Buffalo Bills' Kevin Everett spurs interest in its use in spinal cord injuries.

    By Janet Cromley and Jeannine Stein,
    Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
    September 24, 2007

    Buffalo Bills tight end Kevin Everett's remarkable progress after a recent spinal injury has ignited hopes that one component of his treatment -- therapeutic hypothermia -- could represent a breakthrough for other victims of spinal cord injuries.

    But while promising, rapidly cooling the body following catastrophic spine injury may not become standard practice. The treatment has yet to be proven effective in clinical trials, and it appears to increase the risk of infection and cardiac arrhythmias.

    edit...


    Pushing science forward

    It's also possible, Spoonamore says, that Everett's injury didn't bruise the spinal cord as seriously as originally thought, and he was destined to recover regardless of the treatment.

    "I've treated a number of patients who've been totally [paralyzed] on the initial examination," he says, "and you start the steroids and treat them very quickly, and then miraculously they do recover" over the following days and weeks as the swelling dissipates. Because of all the things done for Everett, it's almost impossible to determine which intervention was most important.

    "The big difference [in this case]," Steward says, "was that the level of care Everett received was extraordinary. If someone injures their spinal cord in an auto accident, it may take hours to even get them out of the car, much less take them to the hospital."

    Everett's extraordinary treatment is a remarkable boon for science, adds Dr. Larry Khoo, co-director of the UCLA Comprehensive Spine Center.

    "Sometimes it takes an event like this to push science forward," he says. "Kevin Everett was the perfect candidate for this. He was in perfect health and received this treatment by a spinal surgeon who was fully prepared. It doesn't get any better than that." As of Thursday, 11 days after the injury, Everett was able to move his legs with 80% to 90% normal strength and was moving his shoulders and biceps with 50% to 60% normal strength. Friday he was transferred from Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital in Buffalo to the Institute for Rehabilitation and Research at Memorial Hermann hospital in Houston to begin a rehabilitation program, according to a spokesman from the Bills. Everett's hands were still weak but improving. His doctors believe he will walk again -- either a testament to medical technology, miraculous intervention, blind luck, or a bit of all three.

  6. #206
    "The big difference [in this case]," Steward says, "was that the level of care Everett received was extraordinary. If someone injures their spinal cord in an auto accident, it may take hours to even get them out of the car, much less take them to the hospital."

    I still don't think the conspiracy theorists understand this
    C5/6 incomplete

    "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

  7. #207
    tiger, what is it with you? i am not "passing judgement" by saying i am skeptical. seems to me you passed a lot more judgement on my supposed motives behind my post than i did on anybody, not to mention a lot of imagined motives. you said something about Green bashing on cc. well, i never heard of the man before everett's accident so you can count me out of that. dunno if i saw a video of him answering any questions. my point was, nobody knows what everett will recover or why. and it was too soon (and still is) to speculate the reasons, let alone the recovery.

    geesh. i'm not refusing to answer any questions. i'm busy at work and type with my thumb knuckle. yes, i am skeptical. anybody who says so-and-so will not walk again (or will) within a day or 2 of injury will make me skeptical because i don't believe anybody can say that in that timeframe, let alone reasons why. if everett walks, there's no proof one way or the other why. cljanney's quoted article says basically the same thing.

    btw, just read about a young mom who had gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. she died in a few months. yeah, i question things. my bad.
    Last edited by cass; 09-23-2007 at 02:03 AM.

  8. #208
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Edwards
    WCR,

    The reason I asked about the type of entity was because it would affect taxing. If it was a non-profit, more people would be willing to donate.

    The majority of people need ease of use to become politically active. We -- generally speaking -- need to provide that for them.

    Ease of use = participation.

    I disagree that we need people who think they may not live to see effective therapies, as that sends mixed messages. If some of us, including you, say the only obstacle is funding and others say -- How am I supposed to know? Do I look like a researcher to you? It may not happen in my lifetime, and I'm 27. -- how will that look?


    We need a consistent message.

    Steven

    Hey Steeve,
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY.
    VITO.

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