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Thread: Researchers use skin-derived stem cells to repair spinal cord injuries

  1. #1

    Researchers use skin-derived stem cells to repair spinal cord injuries

    Finally for cried not aloud, news about spinal cord injury lol.




    Researchers use skin-derived stem cells to repair spinal cord injuries

    Released : Wednesday, September 05, 2007 3:14 PM

    Attention News Editors

    TORONTO, Sept. 5 /CNW/ - Researchers at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and the University of British Columbia (UBC) have used skin-derived stem cells to repair spinal cord injuries in rats. This research was made possible with the support of a $1.5-million NeuroScience Canada Brain Repair Program(TM) team grant that enabled scientists from across Canada to work together and fast track their research. This research is reported in the September 5, 2007 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

    Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) are self-renewing stem cells that reside within the dermis of both rodents and humans and share characteristics with embryonic neural crest stem cells, which are responsible for the generation of the nervous system. The most important characteristic being their ability to turn into neural crest derived cell types like peripheral neurons.

    "We previously discovered that SKPs can efficiently generate a type of glial cell, called Schwann cells that have been shown to provide a good growth environment for injured central nervous system axons," said Dr. Freda Miller, the study's principal investigator, a senior scientist in Developmental Biology in the SickKids Research Institute, a professor of Molecular and Medical Genetics, and Physiology at the University of Toronto, Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Research Scholar and Canada Research Chair in Developmental Neurobiology. "These types of axons normally do not regenerate."

    more:

    http://calibre.mworld.com/m/m.w?lp=G...y&id=269437861

  2. #2
    Attention News Editors:

    Researchers use skin-derived stem cells to repair spinal cord injuries

    TORONTO, Sept. 5 /CNW/ - Researchers at The Hospital for Sick Children
    (SickKids) and the University of British Columbia (UBC) have used skin-derived
    stem cells to repair spinal cord injuries in rats. This research was made
    possible with the support of a $1.5-million NeuroScience Canada Brain Repair
    Program(TM) team grant that enabled scientists from across Canada to work
    together and fast track their research. This research is reported in the
    September 5, 2007 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.
    Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) are self-renewing stem cells that reside
    within the dermis of both rodents and humans and share characteristics with
    embryonic neural crest stem cells, which are responsible for the generation of
    the nervous system. The most important characteristic being their ability to
    turn into neural crest derived cell types like peripheral neurons.
    "We previously discovered that SKPs can efficiently generate a type of
    glial cell, called Schwann cells that have been shown to provide a good growth
    environment for injured central nervous system axons," said Dr. Freda Miller,
    the study's principal investigator, a senior scientist in Developmental
    Biology in the SickKids Research Institute, a professor of Molecular and
    Medical Genetics, and Physiology at the University of Toronto, Howard Hughes
    Medical Institute International Research Scholar and Canada Research Chair in
    Developmental Neurobiology. "These types of axons normally do not regenerate."
    The mammalian spinal cord does not recover well following injury. This is
    due to secondary damage to the spinal cord and surrounding tissue, and loss of
    a conductive insulation on axons called myelin, as well as the failure of
    axons to overcome myelin-associated inhibiting molecules.
    Studies have shown that Schwann cells help promote axonal regeneration
    and that transplantation of these cells facilitates the remyelination of the
    injured spinal cord. However, Schwann cells cannot be harvested without
    invasive surgical biopsies and there are substantial difficulties with
    purifying the cells once they have been extracted.
    "Knowing that harvesting Schwann cells from nerves is invasive and
    difficult, we wanted to test whether SKPs could be used to repair the injured
    rat spinal cord," said Dr. Wolfram Tetzlaff, professor at the University of
    British Columbia, associate director of ICORD (International Collaboration on
    Repair Discoveries) and Edie Ehlers Chair in Spinal Cord Injury Research. "To
    do this the Miller lab isolated and expanded genetically-tagged SKPs,
    differentiated them into Schwann cells and we transplanted them directly into
    the injured rat spinal cord."
    Analysis after 12 weeks following transplantation revealed that the
    SKP-derived Schwann cells survived well within the injured spinal cord,
    reduced the size of the contusion cavity, myelinated endogenous host axons,
    and recruited endogenous Schwann cells into the injured cord.
    These results indicate that transplantation of SKP-Schwann cells
    represent a viable alternative strategy for repairing the injured spinal cord.
    Cells to repair a spinal cord injury could be taken from the injured
    individual's own skin potentially bypassing issues of transplanted cell
    rejection during the healing process.

    more:
    http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/a.../05/c5563.html

  3. #3
    Well they should try this on people right now. This will be from their own stems which is good. No harm done right? Ill try it right now! Maybe I'll get better.

    Skin stem cells used to mend spines of rats



    Toronto research shows injured subjects walking better after injections

    Sep 06, 2007 04:30 AM
    Megan Ogilvie
    Health Reporter

    A Toronto-led team of researchers has found a way to use stem cells derived from skin to treat spinal cord injuries in rats.

    The finding lends promise to the idea that stem cells could one day be used to heal spinal cord injuries in humans, helping thousands of Canadians to walk again.

    Injured rats injected with skin-derived stem cells regained mobility and had better walking co-ordination, according to the study published yesterday in the Journal of Neuroscience. The skin-derived stem cells, injected directly into the injured rats' spinal cords, were able to survive in their new location and set off a flurry of activity, helping to heal the cavity in the cord.

    Freda Miller, a senior scientist at The Hospital for Sick Children and lead author of the study, said skin-derived stem cells have some advantages over other stem cell types. Scientists who use skin to generate stem cells do not need to use embryos, for example, and skin-derived stem cells can potentially be harvested from patients themselves, she said.

    "You can imagine a scenario for people with spinal cord injuries, that maybe, just maybe, we could take a piece of their skin, grow the cells up and transplant them (the patient) with their own cells," she said. "You wouldn't have to give them immunosuppressive drugs. That's a tremendous clinical advantage if it comes true."

    Miller and her colleagues from The Hospital for Sick Children and the University of British Columbia have been exploring the possibilities of using skin to derive stem cells since 2001.

    more:

    http://www.thestar.com/living/Health/article/253699

  4. #4
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wcrabtex
    I wonder what type of injury, severity of injury, chronic or acute?

    WCR
    i'm sure none of thee above. the scam is the cord was never really damage. you know the excused used to explain away all the other 10,000 breakthroughs over the past 10 years.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    i'm sure none of thee above. the scam is the cord was never really damage. you know the excused used to explain away all the other 10,000 breakthroughs over the past 10 years.

    Hi DA, you are breaking my heart.


    quote:

    The next step is to see whether stem cells derived from human skin can produce similar results.

    "We are highly encouraged," said Miller.

    Dr. Young, should I get excited about this? Is this possible?
    Last edited by manouli; 09-06-2007 at 02:59 PM.

  6. #6
    I think the purpose of the study was to see if the transplanted cells survived and to observe their behavior within the cavity, not to measure whether the treatment led to functional return. And nope, there's no indication of the type of injury treated.
    Last edited by antiquity; 09-06-2007 at 04:37 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member mikek's Avatar
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    This is very similiar to what the Miami project has been doing for years with Schwann cells but then their experiments could not be reproduced.

  8. #8
    Senior Member rvr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikek
    This is very similiar to what the Miami project has been doing for years with Schwann cells but then their experiments could not be reproduced.
    reproduced enough to begin translational studies now... at least according to their latest donation mailers...

    gotta admit though - for 5 yrs I've heard "its working on rats", and "in 1 more year we'll try it on humans".... glad I didn't hold my breath and base my remaining life strategy/plans on any of it...

    reminds me of the "hockey stick" sales forcasts I used to review - well, we're here at the bottom but it's trending up and should for quite a while.... after the 3rd month it got old. or with "vaporware", software that doesn't really exist but was being marketed & sold in order to catapult IPO stock prices - till the SEC shut them down...

    after 5 yrs of rats and their pysdo-cures, it's hardly enough to bother yawning for. I'm sure I'm not the only one that's noticed this pattern though. kinda makes me wonder if the SEC should investigate some of these claims though.

    show us documented human trial results and we'll get excited....
    rob

  9. #9
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    There is more missing in this article than revealed. There is not sufficient data in this article to even make an assumption.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Jeff B's Avatar
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    Abstract:

    http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/content...act/27/36/9545

    Skin-Derived Precursors Generate Myelinating Schwann Cells That Promote Remyelination and Functional Recovery after Contusion Spinal Cord Injury
    Jeff Biernaskie,1 * Joseph S. Sparling,4,5 * Jie Liu,4,5 Casey P. Shannon,4,5 Jason R. Plemel,4,5 Yuanyun Xie,4,5 Freda D. Miller,1,2,3 and Wolfram Tetzlaff4,5,6

    Transplantation of exogenous cells is one approach to spinal cord repair that could potentially enhance the growth and myelination of endogenous axons. Here, we asked whether skin-derived precursors (SKPs), a neural crest-like precursor that can be isolated and expanded from mammalian skin, could be used to repair the injured rat spinal cord. To ask this question, we isolated and expanded genetically tagged murine SKPs and either transplanted them directly into the contused rat spinal cord or differentiated them into Schwann cells (SCs), and performed similar transplantations with the isolated, expanded SKP-derived SCs. Neuroanatomical analysis of these transplants 12 weeks after transplantation revealed that both cell types survived well within the injured spinal cord, reduced the size of the contusion cavity, myelinated endogenous host axons, and recruited endogenous SCs into the injured cord. However, SKP-derived SCs also provided a bridge across the lesion site, increased the size of the spared tissue rim, myelinated spared axons within the tissue rim, reduced reactive gliosis, and provided an environment that was highly conducive to axonal growth. Importantly, SKP-derived SCs provided enhanced locomotor recovery relative to both SKPs and forebrain subventricular zone neurospheres, and had no impact on mechanical or heat sensitivity thresholds. Thus, SKP-derived SCs provide an accessible, potentially autologous source of cells for transplantation into and treatment of the injured spinal cord.

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