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Thread: Implantable ID's

  1. #1

    Implantable ID's

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,2715647.story

    Senate blocks mandatory ID implants in employees

    The bill would prevent employers in the state from requiring workers to have the devices.
    By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
    August 31, 2007
    Tackling a dilemma right out of a science fiction novel, the state Senate passed legislation Thursday that would bar employers from requiring workers to have identification devices implanted under their skin.

    State Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto) proposed the measure after at least one company began marketing radio frequency identification devices for use in humans.

    The devices, as small as a grain of rice, can be used by employers to identify workers. A scanner passing over a body part implanted with one can instantly identify the person.

    "RFID is a minor miracle, with all sorts of good uses," Simitian said. "But we shouldn't condone forced 'tagging' of humans. It's the ultimate invasion of privacy."

    Simitian said he fears that the devices could be compromised by persons with unauthorized scanners, facilitating identity theft and improper tracking and surveillance.

    The bill has been approved by the state Assembly and now goes to the governor.

    Nine senators opposed the measure, including Bob Margett (R-Arcadia), who said it is premature to legislate technology that has not yet proved to be a problem. "It sounded like it was a solution looking for a problem," Margett said. "It didn't seem like it was necessary."

    One company, VeriChip, has been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration to sell implanted identification devices, and about 2,000 people have had them implanted, Simitian said. A representative of the firm did not return calls seeking comment Thursday.

    CityWatcher.com, a Cincinnati video surveillance company, has required employees who work in its secure data center to have a microchip implanted in an arm.

    Similar technology has been used for years to help identify lost pets.

    <More>

  2. #2
    The technology sounds useful on the surface, but did you catch the post on RFID chips easily being hacked?
    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showpos...28&postcount=1
    It's pretty scary if you can use RFID technology to target and harm specific individuals.
    Two RFID researchers created a video showing how an RFID reader attached to an improvised explosive device could theoretically identify a U.S. citizen walking past the reader and set off a bomb. They haven't yet tested the theory on a real U.S. passport since the documents have yet to be distributed. The still here shows an attack using a prototype passport with RFID chip placed in the pocket of the victim. As the chip passes the reader, the reader detonates an explosive device placed in the trash can.

  3. #3
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    good idea for pets, bad idea for people.
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  4. #4
    Senior Member wheelchairTITAN's Avatar
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    Maybe if I got lost ... the SPCA could find my owner? Woof!

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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by doingtimeonmyass
    The technology sounds useful on the surface, but did you catch the post on RFID chips easily being hacked?
    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showpos...28&postcount=1
    It's pretty scary if you can use RFID technology to target and harm specific individuals.
    This gives me second thoughts about getting one of those keyless cars that open up when you come close. Perhaps it will just detonate a bomb. Kaboom.

    I wonder why have it implanted. Why not just have the person carry it in his or her wallet or purse. Make it part of a ring, something that you can paste onto the back of your watch, an ear-ring, or even a necklace.

    The other thing is why not require the owner to agree to a return signal by pressing on it. This way, it doesn't respond automatically. It responds only when the owner wants it to do so.

    Wise.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by wheelchairTITAN
    Maybe if I got lost ... the SPCA could find my owner? Woof!
    I suppose like any technology it has it's positives and it's list of negatives. It would be a great service in identifying bodies in a disaster. Or dementia patients when they take off. Or lost children even if they are not found until years later. Or verifying patients in hospitals when medicating.

    Then of course there is the other side of the same coin.
    Life isn't about getting thru the storm but learning to dance in the rain.

  7. #7
    Implantable ID's have been coming down the pipe for some time now.


    Real ID Act
    In a vote that largely divided along party lines, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a Republican-backed measure that would compel states to design their driver's licenses by 2008 to comply with federal antiterrorist standards. Federal employees would reject licenses or identity cards that don't comply, which could curb Americans' access to everything from airplanes to national parks and some courthouses.
    The congressional maneuvering takes place as governments are growing more interested in implanting technology in ID cards to make them smarter and more secure. The U.S. State Department soon will begin issuing passports with radio frequency identification, or RFID, chips embedded in them, and Virginia may become the first state to glue RFID tags into all its driver's licenses.
    source

    Wouldn't it be a lot easier to have all your ID/medical history/bank info implanted in your body? What if it becomes standard, even legally enforced? Some say the Real ID Act is another step along the way in ushering in the Orwelian reality.

  8. #8
    So far, no matter how secure the creators of these technologies claim them to be, someone figures out how to crack them. I won't be getting myself "chipped" anytime soon.

    What would "perfect" identification be like anyway? Is it even possible? Perhaps a device that can quickly and painlessly sequence a small part of your DNA (enough to identify you, not enough to clone you). Orwellian for sure, but perhaps inevitable?

  9. #9
    I wrote an internal invention disclosure about using RF ID to identify implants (pacemaker, ICD, drug pump, etc.) instead of having to rely on an X-ray tag - turned out that Medtronic was several months ahead of me! Dang.
    Actually, many pacemakers and defibrillators have quite a lot of memory, some of is used to store patient data, although always directly associated with the implant. But it takes a special programmer to interrogate it.
    - Richard

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    This gives me second thoughts about getting one of those keyless cars that open up when you come close. Perhaps it will just detonate a bomb. Kaboom.
    RFID is all over the place though. It's on or in high theft items in department stores and embedded in some automobile keys as an antitheft system.
    I wonder why have it implanted. Why not just have the person carry it in his or her wallet or purse. Make it part of a ring, something that you can paste onto the back of your watch, an ear-ring, or even a necklace.
    Good question. Possibly for theft prevention or to eliminate careless handling?

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