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Thread: Emotion Wheels or Magic Wheels??

  1. #1

    Emotion Wheels or Magic Wheels??

    My son attends a school that is rather hilly. He needs help. Does anyone have any views about the e-motion wheels versus the Magic wheels?? He is a T-10 complete para. He just needs assistance in managing the hills with a full backpack.

    Thanks so much for your help! Any suggestions or ideas are appreciated.

    Pam

  2. #2
    MagicWheels work well when negotiating fairly steep grades--such as a minvan ramp. On level surfaces, they have more drag than an average wheelchair wheel. Like conventional wheels, the user's arms supply the power. The reason they help on grades is a 2:1 mechanical gear reduction system inside the wheel that allows the user to go up the grade with less effort because the gearing increases the torque generated with each push (they also do not roll backwards). This is not due to magic, however, so there must be a trade off. The increased torque comes at the expense of reduced acceleration. Thus, if he has to cover a moderate grade over a long distance using the 2:1 ratio, it could take some time. They have a four gear version which several ratios, but I have no experience with it.

    E-motion wheels add 50 lbs. to the wheelchair and about 2" of width. If his seat width is 18" or more, he could encounter accessibility issues. A second set of batteries are necessary to use them for a full day. Because the handrims are out further, the upper extremity movement patterns when pushing the chair are also less than optimal from a biomechanical standpoint. They could still be a feasible option for him, however.

    E-motion wheels retail for $6200, but I discovered that SpinLife sells them for $3,995 (another $995 for a second set of batteries). MagicWheels have a MSRP of $4,995.

    A basic rear drive powerchair like the Quickie P200, P222, or Invacare 3G Storm series may be more practical for getting to classes.

    Even though he has a T10 level injury, it might be possible to convince that your state Vocational Rehab agency to get one for him. They would need to understand that he will have to rely on his arms for mobility for the rest of his life, and that propelling a manual wheelchair on hilly terrain puts him at a significantly increased risk for repetitive strain injuries to his shoulders and wrists. If he loses upper extremity function due to RSI, his potential to be gainfully employed and/or living independently could be adversely affected. Therefore, it would be in their best interest to provide him with this equipment.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR
    E-motion wheels retail for $6200, but I discovered that SpinLife sells them for $3,995 (another $995 for a second set of batteries). MagicWheels have a MSRP of $4,995.
    Correction. Southwest Medical sells them.

  4. #4
    Thank you so much for the information. Ben is trying out the MagicWheels. He loves/hates them right now. You are right. They work well on short grades, but he is on a constant upgrade for quite some distance. They do slow him down, and he is frustrated by that. On the other hand, he likes the fact that they don't roll backward and aren't as difficult going down hills. I would like to try out the dual rim 4 speed option, if it is available. If we get that opportunity, I will post about them.

    As for the emotion wheels, I think they would be more difficult in several ways. We might try them, but I think they aren't logical for our needs. As for assistance in a power chair, we live in Tennessee. There isn't much assistance out there. He is 11, so he doesn't have any state or federal benefits. We also work hard on weight management, so my fear is too much reliance on a power chair.

    I really appreciate your help in this matter.

    Pam

  5. #5
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    He could always use his difficulties in a few years as an excuse to ask a cute girl for help. ;-) (just kidding Mom)

    I always thought the added weight from emotion wheels and the fact they need charging made them a bad idea... obviously magic wheels are lighter. Go for now with whatever is most economical & the best comprimise.

    One thing to think of is the fact your son is only 11, and if he's T10, obviously he has the majority of his upper body intact, and will in time as he grows in the next few years be able to put on a lot of muscles in his upper body that will make hills a lot easier for him to tackle, plus its good exercise. Yes, RSI is a concern, but I'm C5 incomplete, functioning closer to C7, and been in a chair 16 years almost since I was 15 and I've never used a manual chair... no RSI to-date knock on wood. The muscle strength builds up rather quickly when its somethig you do regularly... and your son will have a lot more active muscle than I do. I have a friend whos T10 from a car accident as a late teen and he flies up hills and over everything like its nothing... and he stays in awesome shape just from wheeling... his upper body is rock solid like Rick Hansen from his Man in Motion tour days.

  6. #6

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by pnadolsky
    My son attends a school that is rather hilly. He needs help. Does anyone have any views about the e-motion wheels versus the Magic wheels?? He is a T-10 complete para. He just needs assistance in managing the hills with a full backpack.

    Thanks so much for your help! Any suggestions or ideas are appreciated.

    Pam
    my daughter has the emotion wheels and has had them for one year.They dont last long.her batteries quit charging and they cost 945.00 to replace them.I have had a terible time tring to get them replaced.They come from Germany.Not a reliable wheel for us.

  7. #7

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by mississippi is home
    my daughter has the emotion wheels and has had them for one year.They dont last long.her batteries quit charging and they cost 945.00 to replace them.I have had a terible time tring to get them replaced.They come from Germany.Not a reliable wheel for us.
    majic wheels we are going to try them instead of begging for more wheels.

  8. #8
    I had the E-Motion wheels for a little while. They made my chair huge and if the batteries ever died while I was out I was screwed because they were so heavy. I also lost a lot of strength while using those. I get along almost as well with manual wheels as I did with the e-motions. My opinion, they suck.
    C-5/6, 7-9-2000
    Scottsdale, AZ

    Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

  9. #9
    http://www.livewellmedical.com/index...1c4da9b9e9f11a
    have emotions ($4950), xtenders ($4405) and wijits ($3825) - they have extra parts and batteries too. and somewhere has magic wheelc online too i think - google it. i really want some wijits!

  10. #10
    You might try to get insurance to cover the Magic Wheels, mine did. Tell them that they are needed in order to attend school and will save on the shoulder wear and tear.

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