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Thread: ADI disc brakes for wheelchair

  1. #21
    OK, I'll chime in...

    I've had the disc brakes for about a year and a half with no problems whatsoever. I have the variable lever and it sure does come in handy on inclines (especially in the humid Miami weather).

    They cables have seen no wear and neither have the pads. I have no complaints.

    Any questions, feel free to ask.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodrigo View Post
    OK, I'll chime in...

    I've had the disc brakes for about a year and a half with no problems whatsoever. I have the variable lever and it sure does come in handy on inclines (especially in the humid Miami weather).

    They cables have seen no wear and neither have the pads. I have no complaints.

    Any questions, feel free to ask.
    Just curious, on inclines do they help you to keep your chair from rolling back?

    I figured they'd come in handy for going down bigger hills, but it seemed like keeping them slightly engaged would help going up also.

  3. #23
    And what about when you want to be stopped in a slope?, you have to be with the hands on brake levers always?
    How heavy are they?

  4. #24
    I haven't tried them on inclines, but now I want to. As far as holding your position on an incline, they have a "locked" position when you push all the way down.

    TotoL1, I have the single lever so it's just one push that has variable positions for the lever to stay in. So you can set a level of pressure and then use your hands on the wheels to change direction. If, however, you are a para and/or have very good balance then you can get the para levers which operate the discs individually (they have a locking pin).

    As for the weight, I have no idea.

  5. #25
    Senior Member sci-co-pilot's Avatar
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    Red face

    I have had them for over a year. They work great beats puttiug the lever styel brakes on all the time. Just a quick push and there locked on. I have the variable lever and it works well on hills. The people and ADI are great to work with, Id reccomend them to anyone.

  6. #26
    jb, something to rember. on a hill most quads wont have the balance to apply them and not nose dive going down hill. best way to go down big hill is side to side, cutting the slope
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  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by fuentejps View Post
    jb, something to rember. on a hill most quads wont have the balance to apply them and not nose dive going down hill. best way to go down big hill is side to side, cutting the slope
    i'll have to try that...

    usually if the incline is steep enough, i'll just go backwards. that's the best method i've found so far, but i still have my tipper bars. i'm planning on ditching them eventually once i need to break my chair down, but for now they're staying.

  8. #28
    Senior Member JeffH's Avatar
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    Jun 2006
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    Short vid

    I had my chair fitted with ADI disc brakes with para-levers in January.
    I was headed to the 2009 World Paragliding Championships in Valle de Bravo Mexico.
    I have been to Valle many times (FWIW I broke my neck there 3 years ago) and knew that the hills and rough surfaces would be a challenge in a chair.

    I also took along one of PatD's Freewheel attachments.
    And I always run 2" Kenda knobbies on my everyday chair.

    Although I am technically a low quad I have pretty much full function in my hands. The left has good grip strength of about 100 lbs but the right is still weak with about 10 pounds of grip (measured last summer).
    With the hand function I described I opted for the paralevers because I wanted to be able to steer on the hills.

    Well, they worked great!
    I was able to take some pretty steep hills and maintain directional control with the levers.

    Hills that I would never attempt using just pushrim braking.

    I learned to transition my hands to the levers before I hit the steep sections.

    The sensitivity takes some getting used to, particularly on loose dirt surfaces.

    It is possible to stop on the hill and lock them. Certainly easier than scissors locks.

    It took a bit of fine tuning to get them dialed in but after all they are just mountain bike brakes and are quite simple to adjust.

    They do add a little weight but if you wheel on any hills it is worth hit.

    I'm working on a video about the Paragliding comp that shows the Freewheel and disc brakes in a number of situations but in the meantime I put up a small clip on youtube.



    Jeff
    Doh!

  9. #29
    great vid. but solidifies my point, a quad, even myself, wouldnt have enough balance to not lunge forward
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  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by fuentejps View Post
    great vid. but solidifies my point, a quad, even myself, wouldnt have enough balance to not lunge forward
    i'm kinda looking for an alternative to Ds locks. they work great, but sometimes they don't lock right where you need 'em.

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