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Thread: High-fructose Corn Syrup Linked To Diabetes, New Study Suggests

  1. #1

    High-fructose Corn Syrup Linked To Diabetes, New Study Suggests

    Date: August 23, 2007

    Soda Warning? High-fructose Corn Syrup Linked To Diabetes, New Study Suggests
    Science Daily — Researchers have found new evidence that soft drinks sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) may contribute to the development of diabetes, particularly in children. In a laboratory study of commonly consumed carbonated beverages, the scientists found that drinks containing the syrup had high levels of reactive compounds that have been shown by others to have the potential to trigger cell and tissue damage that could cause the disease, which is at epidemic levels.

    HFCS is a sweetener found in many foods and beverages, including non-diet soda pop, baked goods, and condiments. It is has become the sweetener of choice for many food manufacturers because it is considered more economical, sweeter and more easy to blend into beverages than table sugar. Some researchers have suggested that high-fructose corn syrup may contribute to an increased risk of diabetes as well as obesity, a claim which the food industry disputes. Until now, little laboratory evidence has been available on the topic....


    ..."People consume too much high-fructose corn syrup in this country," says Ho. "It's in way too many food and drink products and there's growing evidence that it's bad for you." The tea-derived supplement provides a promising way to counter its potentially toxic effects, especially in children who consume a lot of carbonated beverages, he says.

    But eliminating or reducing consumption of HFCS is preferable, the researchers note. They are currently exploring the chemical mechanisms by which tea appears to neutralize the reactivity of the syrup.Ho's group is also probing the mechanisms by which carbonation increases the amount of reactive carbonyls formed in sodas containing HFCS. They note that non-carbonated fruit juices containing HFCS have one-third the amount of reactive carbonyl species found in carbonated sodas with HFCS, while non-carbonated tea beverages containing high-fructose corn syrup, which already contain EGCG, have only about one-sixth the levels of carbonyls found in regular soda...

    In the future, food and drink manufacturers could reduce concerns about HFCS by adding more EGCG, using less HFCS, or replacing the syrup with alternatives such as regular table sugar, Ho and his associates say. Funding for this study was provided by the Center for Advanced Food Technology of Rutgers University. Other researchers involved in the study include Chih-Yu Lo, Ph.D.; Shiming Li, Ph.D.; Di Tan, Ph.D.; and Yu Wang, a doctoral student....

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0823094819.htm

    Even regular white table sugar is better than this stuff, geez. The alarming rise of diabetes across the globe is the result of the spread and consumption of all of the crappy 'foods' in the western diet. If folks would return to eating fruits, veggies and the other staples in their native diets that thay are now rejecting, the numbers would drop.

  2. #2
    Senior Member wheelchairTITAN's Avatar
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    I have been learning to check labels on food I buy. What I discovered was exactly what you have pointed out ... fructose is in almost everything that is packaged that needs a "sugar taste " to fool our taste buds.

    William

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