Fill the Cup
Ryan Shannon will bring the Stanley Cup he won with the Ducks to town in a special Obie Harrington-Howes Foundation fundraising event for CT residents living with spinal cord injuries

By Steven Buono, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR

document.write(unescape("GIVING OUT %u2014 Ryan Shannon, 24 of Darien, began rink life with a long stint learning to go, real fast, lacing up with the Darien Youth Hockey Association. Above he lets it go with champion Anaheim last spring. Shannon was traded to Vancouver, a team in dire need of his speed, in the off season. (Photo courtesy of the Anaheim Ducks)\n"));GIVING OUT — Ryan Shannon, 24 of Darien, began rink life with a long stint learning to go, real fast, lacing up with the Darien Youth Hockey Association. Above he lets it go with champion Anaheim last spring. Shannon was traded to Vancouver, a team in dire need of his speed, in the off season. (Photo courtesy of the Anaheim Ducks)
Ryan Shannon gave his all in landing his name on the Stanley Cup with the Anaheim Ducks last season, in only his NHL rookie year.

But this summer Shannon isn’t the only one offered a shot at giving where the Cup is concerned.

So can all of you — just by following Shannon’s lead, when he brings the Cup to the Darien Ice Rink next week.

He is seeing to it that the most hallowed team trophy in the world — the oldest in North America — itself becomes a gift, earned with the sweat of the soul, that keeps on giving.

The event, starting at 10 a.m. and running until 11:30 a.m., Thursday, Aug. 23, is a Homecoming Celebration for the one-time Darien Youth Hockey Association skater, but more than that, it is also going to be a heartfelt fundraiser to assist those in the state who have been stricken with spinal cord injury.

"(It’s) an effort to give back. Obie Harrington-Howes is one of the people I credit with instilling in me a passion for the game."
Ryan Shannon

Because it was someone very close to Shannon’s hockey heart and soul that was stricken in the prime of life with just such a tragedy.

document.write(unescape("FAST PAST %u2014 Once upon a time, in a rink not so far away... Ryan Shannon began his rocket-like trajectory toward the Stanley Cup."));FAST PAST — Once upon a time, in a rink not so far away... Ryan Shannon began his rocket-like trajectory toward the Stanley Cup. Darien’s Obie Harrington-Howes — Shannon’s first hockey coach, as well as the coach of many a DYHA player over the years — was paralyzed in a swimming accident at Jones Beach in New York on July 4, 1997.

“(It’s) an effort to give back,” Shannon said. “Obie Harrington-Howes is one of the people I credit with instilling in me a passion for the game.”

The Obie Harrington-Howes Foundation was set up to help him and so many others with spinal cord injuries. Visitors to the rink will be asked to make a contribution to the Foundation when they come by to commune with the Cup.

The Foundation is a not-for-profit 501(c)3 organization that was established in response to the life-changing tragedy which left Harrington-Howes paralyzed with a damaged spine.

Ninety-seven cents of every dollar donated will go to help people with severe spinal cord injuries.

The Foundation’s focus is to assist people living in Connecticut with non-reimbursable medical expenses.

For more information visit the Foundation’s Web site at ohhf.org.

There will also be Stanley Cup souvenirs for sale at the rink, with portions of the proceeds going to the Foundation.

Shannon — who was subsequently dealt to the Vancouver Canucks, a team in deep need of the wingers’ highly regarded speed, early this summer — and the Cup will be back where it all started for the youth hockey rocket kid, at the Darien Ice Rink, located at 55 Old Kings Highway North.

And starting at ten o’clock on the morning of Aug. 23, that will be the place to be.

This — most rare event, with the Stanley Cup very much on hand — is open to the public, with donations to the Foundation very much the central theme of what is to be a positive, celebratory, and giving, fundraising affair.

In so many cases, an NHLer tends to tuck the Cup away on the day the team, and league, following well over 100 years of tradition, grants each player on the championship roster a private day with the wholly magic grail of hockey.

Shannon’s planning to have some private time with the hardware too, but in a class move befitting his character, he is both helping a tremendously worthy local charity, and in an enlightened nod too, spreading the silver as far as it can shine.

Come out and shine with Shannon, the Cup, and the hopes of so many Connecticut residents living with spinal cord injuries, in need of an assist.

Like the man said, the Cup is for filling.


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