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Thread: Lumbar supports

  1. #1
    Senior Member forestranger52's Avatar
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    Lumbar supports

    What type of lumbar supports are folks using?

    Why don't these expensive power chairs have the backs shaped to provide us quads with lumbar support?
    I have a tendency to lean forward since my support mussels are limited.
    I have used different lumbar supports but have trouble with placing them behind my back after being lowered into my power chair. If I put them in first they get crushed.
    Thanks,
    Mac
    C 5/6 Comp.
    No Tri's or hand function.

    Far better it is to try mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure. Than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much or suffer much, because they live in the grey twilight that knows neither victory or defeat.

    Teddy Roosevelt

  2. #2
    Oftentimes if I supplement padding to provide additional lumbar or lateral support, I will insert it behind the main pad inside the cover. If you find the right place, shape, & size which provides good support, it can be glued to the main back pad using 3M spray adhesive (Super 77 or 99, I forget which).

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR
    Oftentimes if I supplement padding to provide additional lumbar or lateral support, I will insert it behind the main pad inside the cover. If you find the right place, shape, & size which provides good support, it can be glued to the main back pad using 3M spray adhesive (Super 77 or 99, I forget which).
    Be mindful, however, that adding additional lumbar padding can result in unintentionally shorten your seat depth -- i.e., it pushes you forward in your seat. I briefly experimented with adding a foam wedge to my Roho Jetstream but the result wasn't worth the tradeoff. I had less seat and my COG was altered.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212
    Be mindful, however, that adding additional lumbar padding can result in unintentionally shorten your seat depth -- i.e., it pushes you forward in your seat. I briefly experimented with adding a foam wedge to my Roho Jetstream but the result wasn't worth the tradeoff. I had less seat and my COG was altered.
    True with a manual wheelchair, but a 1-1.5" thick piece of foam which is properly sized and corresponds to the lumbar curve should not eat up much depth. On most powerchairs these days, the depth is also adjustable.

    One of the issues I have with the JetStream is that the padding seems too thick and does not compress all that much. The result is that a person can feel they are being pushed forward.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR
    One of the issues I have with the JetStream is that the padding seems too thick and does not compress all that much.
    It does over time. Mine certainly did; there's not a lot of depth when I'm leaning up against it. It compresses more than the padding on one of my old J2 backs, for example, and that one was in service for longer than the JetStream has been.

  6. #6

    Lumbar Support Cushion Examples

    Aloha,

    I recommend lumbar support cushions for many of my clients who are experiencing lower back pain associated with sitting for long periods or driving. Many cars and seats are not ergonomically friendly to begin with and it seems that achieving comfort from support devices can vary from person to person.

    There are so many types of lumbar support cushions available to use. Each one offers different "coverage". Keep in mind there are varying levels of firmness, shape, and length to choose from. Most lumbar supports can also be used for cervical (neck) support, if not too thick or even under the knees or ankles for elevation benefits. I will try to give a few examples of common choices (pictures are borrowed from the professional wholesale site I order from http://www.GNRcatalog.com to give proper credit.)

    > Self Inflating Lumbar Supports - allows for the user to adjust size and produce a personalized level of support, easy portability and attachement. See picture for size / shape:



    > Full Lumbar Rolls - provides fuller support for larger frames or frequent shifting. Some are available in a 10" or longer 15" as a general rule. See picture for size / shape:



    > "D" 3/4 or 1/2 Lumbar Rolls - shaped like an upper case D with 3/4 or 1/2 width of the full size, mostly used at an office chair. See picture for size / shape:



    > Full Back Lumbar Rolls - extends support high up the back and has side rib curves that cradle the upper body toward positions of proper support. See picture for size/shape:



    You can even experiment with a rolled up towel in dire need! There are so many variations, and then there are lumbar support braces and support belts (like SI type belts). Stephen212 makes a valid point when mentioning the potential for shortening your seat depth. The self-inflating lumbar support devices allow for personalized adjustment to the posture and seat setup.

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