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Thread: Kids and the concept of "cathing"

  1. #1

    Kids and the concept of "cathing"

    Recently eldest son (10) asked me how I can pee now that I'm paralyzed (T7/10). I explained that it was a process called "cathing". I got out a catheter and the rest of the equipment and explained the whole process in detail (without actually demonstrating, though I don't think that would have bothered him too much). He thanked me for the info and went about his way.

    A short while later my second son (7) came in to my room and said "Why will you show him how you 'cath' and not me?" I told him it was just because he hadn't asked, and gave him the same explanation. He turned a bit pale as I explained, and when I was done he ran out of the room with his hands protecting his crotch . Very funny.

    Literally five minutes later, my daughter (5) came in and said "How come you show them about 'caffin' but not me?" I then gave her an abbreviated version of the explanation. She giggled and turned red, and left the room quite satisfied.

    For some reason, it makes me happy when my kids are interested in the effects of my SCI, and I'll explain everything to them, even if the topics are not really pleasant. Their questions are more forthright than those asked by adults, and they know much more about SCI now than most adults do.

  2. #2
    Senior Member GoTWHeeLs's Avatar
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    That's good that they handled it so well. I have a superpubic and my son who will be 3 in October makes me giggle when I drain my bag because he will get next to me about three feet away and crouch down and watch. Then he'll look up at me while he's still crouching and say "Daddy, you go pee-pee?" Its truly hilarious and makes the issue alot more bareable.
    Say what you mean and mean what you say because those who mind dont matter and those who matter dont mind.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member jessie.gray's Avatar
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    My two girls kept pointing to my catheter supplies when they were younger and when they learned how to talk, they were really interested in how I was peeing if I was sticking a tube in my belly button (I have a mitrofanoff). My oldest daughter one day told everyone who was in the apartment lobby waiting for the mail guy "Hey Look, momma goes pee-pee here!" and pointed to her belly button. Let's just say, I was pretty embarassed. Oh, the joys of raising toddlers!

    About a year later, both of my girls had to use catheters, because they too were diagnosed with HSP and neurogenic bladders. So now, they really don't ask me many questions, because they have to have the same thing done several times a day. I agree with you. My girls probably know more about HSP than most doctors do. I'm always happy to teach them stuff about it and why I have to do certain procedures on them everyday (like bowel emptying and catheterization).

    Jessie

  4. #4
    Jessie, How old are your daughters now and has HSP effected their mobility also. This is the first time I even heard about HSP so excuse my ignorance. My 5 year old son is a para after an RTA and I find it hard to cope with his care regime so I will give myself a good kick in the ass the next time I feel sorry for myself.

    My son wears nappies and has been very open about it, sometime I wish a little less open. However, he insist in pulling his belt so tight that I am sometimes afraid he can't breath. The reason is when he crawls he doesn't want anyone seeing his nappy. His friends for the most part have been okay about this as one kid says nappies are for babies but Sean wear ones for big boys.

  5. #5
    My kid takes about 45 minutes to take a dump. If I have to pee, there is no way I'm going to wait. I don't need a toilet, so ... Both my children are VERY familiar with my SCI. They've seen me pee, they've seen me shit myself, they've seen me fall on the floor. As long as I don't freak out, neither will they. Of course the shitting is the most humiliating but hey, that's life.

  6. #6
    One day the subject of peeing came up between our two girls. The 4 year old asked her dad " Why do you pee in a bag?" Then the 8 year old (that is the resident expert on everything) interjected with " cause his wiener is broken". We got a good chuckle out of that one. I swear these kids know just when to lighten the mood. I am gratefull for that.
    Jennifer - Married to Jeremy (C-5 inc. brown-sequard) mommy of two little drama queens

  7. #7
    My son was 11 when I got SCI. Once my friend came in, asked where I was, Jake said (very importantly) "Mom and Dad are doing the urin-ing thing."

    God I luv em, aren't they great?

  8. #8
    yeah, cathing, bowel routines, crapping my pants, falling out of my chair, etc. are no big deal to my kiddo. We've actually had to talk to her about how those issues are private and a little embarassing - or she would tell others. Still didn't stop her from lifting my shirt in the checkout line yesterday and loudly informing me that I ' was peeing' ( leaking from my stoma).

    Kids... we read stories while I do my routine, when she was younger I'd give her a bottle in the bathroom lol.
    Emily, C-8 sensory incomplete mom to a 8 year old and a preschooler. TEN! years post.

  9. #9
    Senior Member jessie.gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by soimumireland
    Jessie, How old are your daughters now and has HSP effected their mobility also. This is the first time I even heard about HSP so excuse my ignorance. My 5 year old son is a para after an RTA and I find it hard to cope with his care regime so I will give myself a good kick in the ass the next time I feel sorry for myself.

    My son wears nappies and has been very open about it, sometime I wish a little less open. However, he insist in pulling his belt so tight that I am sometimes afraid he can't breath. The reason is when he crawls he doesn't want anyone seeing his nappy. His friends for the most part have been okay about this as one kid says nappies are for babies but Sean wear ones for big boys.
    My oldest daughter is 3 1/2 years old and my youngest daughter is 2 years old. Both have HSP and its affected their mobility in different ways. Emma, my oldest, can walk with a walker indoors, but has to use a manual wheelchair outdoors (we have a Quickie Kidz chair for her that's made for toddlers). Her muscles are so weak that they won't hold her up for long walking. Angela, my youngest, can still walk on her own with a pediatric cane, but has to wear AFO leg braces to keep her feet flat on the floor, because she walks on her toes constantly.
    Its okay if you don't know anything about HSP. Very few people do because its rare. I don't know how many times I have to explain the disorder to new doctors and hospital staff, becuase they have never heard of it.
    Both of my girls still wear pull-ups at night, but wear regular underwear with a bladder control pad during the day, unless we are going to be out for a while. Both girls were really happy when they finally could stay dry enough to wear underwear during the day, but if my oldest feels like she having a "bad bladder day" and is having a lot of accidents, she'll wear the pull-ups during the day. Because their bladders empty unexpectedly at night, we still have to use the pull-up diapers then. They have some that have Clifford the dog on them that I get from their insurance every month. I used to use fitted cloth diapers with a cover at night, but recently stoped doing this when their insurance started covering the disposables (I had been using cloth diapers on them since they were born).

    Jessie

  10. #10
    Senior Member jessie.gray's Avatar
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    oh, the joys of parenthood!
    I remember breastfeeding the girls when they were infants while sitting on the toilet waiting for my bowel program to kick in.

    Jessie
    Last edited by jessie.gray; 09-17-2007 at 06:21 PM.

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