Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 45

Thread: Cure methods 4 chronic SCI in rats

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Leif
    Good explanations about the different types of injury, thanks. What I meant by that many with ischemia also has cut injuries was say like in my case; I had this avm located in the centre of the cord, at the end it had to be surgically cut out. That’s what I meant with cut injuries. The amazing thing though, although the surgeon (Dr. Spetzler in AZ) had to cut his way into the cord I actually did not become worse of this procedure, in fact he stopped the worsening state I was in. But I think he must have made some damage when cutting into the cord, but it is strange I think that I don’t have any negative results of it. Are there maybe some places in the cord that is better to cut in if one has to do that? Mine injury then might have been both ischemia, compression and cut maybe? A combination I mean.
    Leif, cutting into the spinal cord is not as bad as people think. In fact, you can cut half the spinal cord of a rat and it will recover walking in a week. What is damaging to the spinal cord is prolonged compression of the spinal cord, particularly if it is already ischemic and edematous to begin with. Also, blood leaking into the parenchyma of the cord is toxic to the spinal cord, causing vasoconstriction and cell damage.

    In AVM surgery, the surgeon tries to avoid cutting into the tissue, tries to find the plane between the vascular malformation and the spinal cord, gently dissecting it off with the minimum of bleeding. If he/she compresses the cord at all, the goal is to do it gently, slowly, and briefly. To stop the bleeding, one uses a bipolar coagulator to occlude the vessels before cutting or manipulating them. To keep from compressing the cord, many surgeons put retaining sutures that they can use to lift the AVM from the cord and use sharp dissection to cut the connective tissues in the plane.

    Wise.

    In my opinion, Dr. Spetzler is one of the best neurovascular surgeon in the United States today.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 08-19-2007 at 09:36 AM.

  2. #32
    lot of great info Dr. Young. would the heat from the bullet also cause damage?
    oh well

  3. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    minnesota
    Posts
    2,086
    I am still trying to understand the medical stuff-it was never explained to me. I had a bone fragment "severly compress" my spinal cord at the T8 level. It was removed about 15 hours after my fall and I was given a new T8 vertebrae (from my hip) then fused from T6-T10 with two rods and six screws. What is the ishemia you talk about? Does the spinal cord stay compressed after the bone fragment is removed? Thanks for some info. Maybe someday I will get a better idea of my injury.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by kenf
    lot of great info Dr. Young. would the heat from the bullet also cause damage?
    kenf,

    My first guess would be that bullet will have transferred a great deal of its thermal energy to surrounding tissue and would not be so hot as to "cook" the tissue by the time it reaches the spinal cord. The temperature of the bullet would only be relevant to "bullet-in-canal" cases. However, studies of bullet interaction with different fabrics (Source) suggest that the heat of the bullet does have effects on the fabrics they are passing through. So, I may be wrong.

    I had zero experience with gunshot wounds until I worked as an intern at Bellevue Hospital, where the job of interns was to remove bullets from the bodies of people who have been shot. In my opinion, the most important factor by far is the velocity of the bullet. I would rather be hit by a heavy (500 grain or 32.5 gram) 0.45 caliber (0.45 inch or 11.4 mm diameter) bullet traveling a relatively slow velocity than a small and light 0.22 caliber bullet travelling at a higher velocity.

    The shape and material of the bullet is also important, because these determine the behavior of the bullet once it enters the body. It may fragment, tumble, or bounce. The best way to study bullets in the body is with CT scans. Note that while there are fears that strong magnetic fields of MRI's may move bullets, but most studies suggest that it is safe to carry out MRI's people who have bullets in their body.

    Wise.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by momo3
    I am still trying to understand the medical stuff-it was never explained to me. I had a bone fragment "severly compress" my spinal cord at the T8 level. It was removed about 15 hours after my fall and I was given a new T8 vertebrae (from my hip) then fused from T6-T10 with two rods and six screws. What is the ishemia you talk about? Does the spinal cord stay compressed after the bone fragment is removed? Thanks for some info. Maybe someday I will get a better idea of my injury.
    momo,

    From your description, you had compression of your spinal cord for 15 hours. When the bone fragment is removed, it means that is no longer compressing the spinal cord. The rest is just stabilizing your spinal column.

    Actually 15 hours is relatively fast decompression time for a thoracic spinal cord injury. A thoracic spinal injury requires a thoracic surgeon on the team because the surgery involves opening the chest. This surgery requires a thoracic surgeon, an orthopedic surgeon, and possibly a neurosurgeon.

    Wise.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Kratos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Lat:+46,034635 Long:+16,619310 Croatia
    Posts
    782
    A thoracic spinal injury requires a thoracic surgeon on the team because the surgery involves opening the chest. This surgery requires a thoracic surgeon, an orthopedic surgeon, and possibly a neurosurgeon.
    so dr.young is that why i was not operated? my doc told me that surgery was not required, that injury is complete. im t5. and what will happen one day when (if)cure comes, now i'm scared ,the idea that some doc will open my chest lol...

  7. #37
    i went through 3 nero's to find one who would fix my verts and get pressure off my cord. he was a fairly young Dr. who had a great understanding of future stem cell use. they called part of my injury T4-T5 fx , subluxation with canal compromise. other drs. said the area is stable and don't worry about it. the Dr. who did the surjury knew i could not have that bone pushing on my cord. i still wonder what would of happen if i wouldn't have waited a year to do the surjury. they just went though my back and put in rods from T2 to T7. took them 10 hr's, i wonder if they take a lunch break? i'm sure all cases are different. he posted 2 x-rays side by side on the PC before and after , what a diff. i'm listed as C5 ASIA A Tetraplegia in my discharge papers. i guess the wondering if something could happen made me do it. was no fun lol
    oh well

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivica Rod
    A thoracic spinal injury requires a thoracic surgeon on the team because the surgery involves opening the chest. This surgery requires a thoracic surgeon, an orthopedic surgeon, and possibly a neurosurgeon.
    so dr.young is that why i was not operated? my doc told me that surgery was not required, that injury is complete. im t5. and what will happen one day when (if)cure comes, now i'm scared ,the idea that some doc will open my chest lol...

    In order to get to the front of the thoracic spine, the surgeon has to put the patient on a ventilator, open the chest, and deflate the lung on one side. While this is not difficult, most orthopedic surgeons don't have the experience to do this on their own.

    There is a school of thought amongst surgeons that somebody with a "complete" spinal cord injury does not need to be decompressed. I disagree with this approach.

    Wise.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by kenf
    i went through 3 nero's to find one who would fix my verts and get pressure off my cord. he was a fairly young Dr. who had a great understanding of future stem cell use. they called part of my injury T4-T5 fx , subluxation with canal compromise. other drs. said the area is stable and don't worry about it. the Dr. who did the surjury knew i could not have that bone pushing on my cord. i still wonder what would of happen if i wouldn't have waited a year to do the surjury. they just went though my back and put in rods from T2 to T7. took them 10 hr's, i wonder if they take a lunch break? i'm sure all cases are different. he posted 2 x-rays side by side on the PC before and after , what a diff. i'm listed as C5 ASIA A Tetraplegia in my discharge papers. i guess the wondering if something could happen made me do it. was no fun lol
    I don't understand. Did you have two spinal cord injuries, one at C5 and the other at T4-6?

    Wise.

  10. #40
    Senior Member Kratos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Lat:+46,034635 Long:+16,619310 Croatia
    Posts
    782
    thank you dr.young. i will TALK with my doc's about it.. can i use your name to scare them ?(joke)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-11-2006, 12:59 PM
  2. New Mobility Article
    By mk99 in forum Cure
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-09-2006, 05:02 PM
  3. HGH & testosterone
    By Varian in forum Cure
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-04-2004, 11:42 PM
  4. relationship re:SCI & thyroid
    By franroty in forum Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-02-2001, 08:04 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •