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Thread: former caregiver, should I do it again?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Question former caregiver, should I do it again?

    I took care of a remarkable woman that many of you might know. I was also editing her book. She passed away the first week of July, and I'm heartbroken. She loved me so much and was so worried that I'd leave her to get a different job. I snuffed her insecurities and became her friend, confidante, and companion.
    Can I do it again? I don't know. She was the happiest quad on earth.

    Eve

  2. #2
    Senior Member 6string's Avatar
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    First, welcome to CC. Now the question...It's obvious you found it rewarding the first time. But no two people are alike. I think you should do it again, but let your heart tell you if it's something you want to stay with. Just know that things will probably be different.
    "Music will always find its way to us, with or without business, politics, religion, or any other bullshit attached. Music survives everything, and like God it is always present. It needs no help, and suffers no hindrance. It has always found me, and with God's blessing and permission, it always will." Eric Clapton

  3. #3

    only you know that answer...

    ...I just wish you lived in Idaho. I have a sister who is in need of a full-time caregiver...and is having zero luck finding someone. I wish I had the power to rewrite the rules...then those better angels who do the hard work of helping those in need would be the ones pulling down the six and seven figure salaries...while those hitting the chemically induced home runs would be working night shift at the Quickie-Mart, wondering how they were going to make a living when the games were over.

    You know first hand the profound affect you have on another persons life. As a family member, I'm there for obvious reasons. I know the toll, both physical and emotional that must be paid. I also know the unending depth of gratitude we all feel to people like you who are willing to help carry that load. Seems to me that 6string is right...this is one of those things that is easily over-thought...one instance when your heart is smarter than your brain. The need, unfortunately, is there...only you know if you feel it, too....

  4. #4
    Good PCAs are worth their weight in gold! If you like this work, keep in the field. You are in a seller's market, so make a list of questions you want answers to when interviewing. if the relationship does not click, give your employer enough notice to replace you, and move on.

    Welcome to our forums, and I am sorry about the death of your former employer. It sounds like you really helped her a lot.

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    Senior Member GoTWHeeLs's Avatar
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    Was it the relationship you loved or the work? I never met Debbie, but i'm sure she's everything you said she was, but not all clients are going to be pleasent. If you found the work rewarding and enjoyed that then why not continue working. Best wishes in your decision.
    Say what you mean and mean what you say because those who mind dont matter and those who matter dont mind.

    My Myspace



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