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Thread: Speaking of potatoes

  1. #1

    Speaking of potatoes

    This should be easy for a para or quad to pull off and can be ladled out of the pot into a bowl, no lifting and pouring from the pot required.

    I'll put quad suggestions in parentheses.

    One Pot Potato Soup

    Serving: 6
    Prep Time: 15 minutes
    Cook Time: 30 minutes
    Total Time: 45 minutes

    4 peeled potatoes (just buy a bag of frozen stew vegetables, these always include potatoes, carrots etc)
    1 small onion
    4 green onions (chopped onions are available frozen or pre-chopped fresh which is offered at most large supermarkets)
    1 garlic clove (easier from a jar of minced garlic, use a teaspoon)
    3 tbsp butter (butter in a squirt bottle may be easier)
    3 cups chicken broth (can be subbed with chicken boullion cubes)
    3/4 cup whipping cream
    1 cup milk
    dash white pepper

    1. Chop the potatoes, onions and green onions. Finely chop the garlic clove. (not necessary)

    2. In heavy skillet, lightly saute the onions and garlic.

    3. Add the potatoes and chicken broth. Simmer until the potatoes are tender.

    (just dump bag contents into pot)

    4. Mash the potatoes (I'd skip this step) onions and garlic with a potato masher. Add the cream, milk, salt and pepper and heat through.

    Sounds yummy.
    Last edited by antiquity; 07-16-2007 at 05:25 PM.

  2. #2
    http://cantaremusic.com/stories/potato_history.htm

    History and Origin of the Potato
    Domesticación de la patata

    The birthplace of the "Irish" white potato that we eat today is in the Andean Mountains of South America, at heights of 4,000 to 6,000 feet. The potato was cultivated more than 6,000 years ago near Titicaca Lake, on the border between Perú and Bolivia, where the greatest diversity of wild species can be found. The Aymara Indians developed over two hundred varieties on the Titicaca Plateau at elevations above 10,000 feet.

    They were the innovators of the freeze-dried potato, or chuño. “Chuño” is still produced as it was at the time of the Incas. The potatoes are spread on the ground on frosty nights. During the day they are covered with straw to protect against the burning rays of the sun. This way the potatoes go completely white. After exposure to several nights of frost, women and children trample on the potatoes to get rid of moisture and wear away the peel. The potatoes are then put in a stream with running water for a few weeks in order to wash out the bitter taste. Finally they're dried for about 14 days and can be stored without problems for up to 4 years."

    Nazca Potato God
    According to http://www.history-magazine.com/potato.html Charles Darwin visited Patagonia (in South America) and became fascinated by the potato, point out "It is remarkable that the same plant should be found on the sterile mountins of Central Chile, where a drop of rain does not fall for more than six months, and with the damp forests of the southern islands."

    The lowly potato enjoys many superlatives. The potato is rich in starch, vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. It lacks calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D. It provides more nutritious food faster on less land that any other food crop, and in almost any habitat. It was first cultivated in South American 3000-7000 years ago. It was first encountered by Spanish Conquistadores in 1532. It was used as basic rations aboard their ships. It arrived in Spain in 1570, cultivated as food for livestock, and slowly spread to Italy and other European countries.

    Most people initially regarded potatoes with suspicion, distaste, and fear but upper class and scientists realized its value. In 1662, the Royal Society recommended the potato to the government. In 1795, the British government officially encouraged potato cultivation. This crossed the English channel to the Netherlands, Belgium, France, and then Prussia, and Russia. In 1620, the potato was introduced to North American colonies.

    The potato prevented scurvy and famine, increasing birth rates wherever the potato went. This is an incredible observation. The potato may have been responsible for the population explosion in Europe, the United States, and the British Empire. The potato became the food of the masses. Between 1801 and 1851, England and Wales experienced a doubling of its population. Here is a map of potato cultivation in early 20th Century Europe.


    The Irish embraced the potato and many Irish lived on milk and potatoes alone since the two together provided the essential nutrients. The importance of the potato to Ireland became clear in 1845, when the potato blight (a fungus) destroyed the food crop. About a million people (12%) of the population died, accompanied by an exodus of another million Irish to Britain, United States, Canada, and Australia (Source). In England, the religious-minded social reformers viewed the blight as a "heaven-sent blessing" that would finally provide an opportunity to transform Ireland, ending the cycle of poverty resulting from the dependence on potato (Source).

    Amazing.

    Wise.

  3. #3
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    i love baked potatoes with sour cream,bacon bits and chopped green onions.
    yammmm.........
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      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  4. #4
    Thanks for the history lesson Wise.

    The tomato is also interesting as it became such an important staple in Italian cuisine although it's a new world fruit. I wonder what italian food was like before its introduction but someone conjectured that it was probably closer to greek and middle eastern cuisine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    http://cantaremusic.com/stories/potato_history.htm



    According to http://www.history-magazine.com/potato.html Charles Darwin visited Patagonia (in South America) and became fascinated by the potato, point out "It is remarkable that the same plant should be found on the sterile mountins of Central Chile, where a drop of rain does not fall for more than six months, and with the damp forests of the southern islands."

    The lowly potato enjoys many superlatives. The potato is rich in starch, vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. It lacks calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D. It provides more nutritious food faster on less land that any other food crop, and in almost any habitat. It was first cultivated in South American 3000-7000 years ago. It was first encountered by Spanish Conquistadores in 1532. It was used as basic rations aboard their ships. It arrived in Spain in 1570, cultivated as food for livestock, and slowly spread to Italy and other European countries.

    Most people initially regarded potatoes with suspicion, distaste, and fear but upper class and scientists realized its value. In 1662, the Royal Society recommended the potato to the government. In 1795, the British government officially encouraged potato cultivation. This crossed the English channel to the Netherlands, Belgium, France, and then Prussia, and Russia. In 1620, the potato was introduced to North American colonies.

    The potato prevented scurvy and famine, increasing birth rates wherever the potato went. This is an incredible observation. The potato may have been responsible for the population explosion in Europe, the United States, and the British Empire. The potato became the food of the masses. Between 1801 and 1851, England and Wales experienced a doubling of its population. Here is a map of potato cultivation in early 20th Century Europe.


    The Irish embraced the potato and many Irish lived on milk and potatoes alone since the two together provided the essential nutrients. The importance of the potato to Ireland became clear in 1845, when the potato blight (a fungus) destroyed the food crop. About a million people (12%) of the population died, accompanied by an exodus of another million Irish to Britain, United States, Canada, and Australia (Source). In England, the religious-minded social reformers viewed the blight as a "heaven-sent blessing" that would finally provide an opportunity to transform Ireland, ending the cycle of poverty resulting from the dependence on potato (Source).

    Amazing.

    Wise.

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