Thread: Stem Cell Articles

  1. #1361
    Senior Member Bhaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Kolkata, India
    Posts
    577

    Trials: Stroke & CP

    Stem Cell Therapy Studies For Stroke, Cerebral Palsy Prepare For Clinical Trials
    ScienceDaily (Jan. 30, 2008) — Finding answers about optimal dosage and timing for stem cell therapy in adults with strokes and newborns with ischemic injuries is a goal of two new federally funded studies.

    The answers are critical before clinical trials can begin, says Dr. Cesario V. Borlongan, neuroscientist at the Medical College of Georgia and Charlie Norwood Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He is principal investigator on the National Institutes of Health grants totaling $6 million that also will explore long-term benefits of cell therapy.

    If these additional laboratory studies replicate the promising results of the pilot studies, which indicate about a 25 percent improvement in recovery over controls, MCG and VA researchers hope to begin clinical trials in new ischemic injuries in adults and children within two years.

    "We are looking at different procedures that we can adopt from the laboratory for the clinic," Dr. Borlongan says. "We have at least 10 years of basic research that clearly shows that stem cells have the potential to be a new therapy for adult stroke."

    More : http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0129160714.htm

  2. #1362
    Senior Member Bhaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Kolkata, India
    Posts
    577

    Kidney Cancer Drug for AML

    Kidney Cancer Drug Attacks A Major Type Of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ScienceDaily (Jan. 29, 2008) — A drug used to treat kidney cancer also targets a genetic mutation active in about one third of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common and lethal form of adult leukemia, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center report in the Jan. 29 edition of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

    In a Phase I clinical trial, the drug sorafenib reduced the median percentage of leukemia cells circulating in the blood from 81 percent to 7.5 percent and in the bone marrow from 75.5 percent to 34 percent among AML patients whose leukemia includes the FLT3-ITD mutation. Two patients had circulating leukemia cells, or blasts, drop to zero.

    "AML patients with this mutation have a particularly poor prognosis, so this highly targeted drug appears to be a significant step forward in leukemia therapy," says senior author Michael Andreeff, M.D., Ph.D., professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy and Department of Leukemia.

    The JNCI paper reports the drug's effect in lab experiments, a mouse model of the disease, and in a Phase I study of 16 patients with relapsed or resistant AML known to have the FLT3-ITD mutation.

    More : http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0129160739.htm

  3. #1363
    Sales of Stem Cell Products Expected to Reach $87 Million in 2008, Leading Medical Industry Analyst Says


    Robin R. Young to Provide 10-Year Forecast at 3rd Annual Stem Cell Summit on Feb. 26

    PHILADELPHIA, February 01, 2008 /PRNewswire/ -- Stem cell product sales in the United States totaled $36 million in 2007, a 119 percent increase from the previous year, and are expected to reach $87 million, a 144 percent increase, in 2008, according to Robin R. Young, CFA, a medical industry analyst ranked as one of The Wall Street Journal's "Best on the Street" and among Institutional Investor's top-10.

    more:

    http://www.pharmalive.com/News/index...&categoryid=15

  4. #1364
    Scientists create stem cells from skin tissue
    Date: February 01, 2008

    The two research teams of Cheju National University and Konkuk University succeded in producing stem cells out of skin tissue and applied for patents as announced on Friday (Feb. 1).Korean scientists said Friday (Feb. 1) that they have successfully produced stem cells from the skin tissue of laboratory animals without relying on the use of ovum.

    The move, which may skirt ethical controversy surrounding the use of ovum in laboratories, is the third of its kind after scientists in Japan and the United States announced similar breakthroughs in 2006 and 2007.

    The use of eggs has drawn fire become some pro-life and religious groups claim that using the cells is the equivalent of taking a life.

    The team led by Park Se-pill, a life engineering professor at Cheju National University, said it created the stem cell from somatic cell samples of mice, possibly opening new opportunities for the creation of patient-specific stem cells.

    Theoretically, patient-specific cells could be designed to grow into replacement organs, nerves and muscle that are not rejected by the body’s immune system. They could also be used to treat such diseases as Alzheimer’s and diabetes and help people suffering from paralysis of limbs caused by damaged vertebrae.



    more:

    http://www.kois.go.kr/news/news/news...rchDay=&page=1

  5. #1365
    Patients to go for stem cell therapy annually in India

    2 Feb, 2008, 0051 hrs IST,Writankar Mukherjee, TNN



    KOLKATA: The day may not be too far when India may become a global hub for cure to deadly diseases such as diabetes, cancer, neurology and cardiac problems.

    Courtesy, the huge corporate interest to invest in the relatively nascent field of regenerative medicine, comprising stem cell therapies and tissue engineering. Estimates suggest about 15-20 million people will go for stem cell therapies every year in India.

    Little wonder, players like the Reliance Group, Apollo Hospitals, Fortis, LifeCell and Cryobanks are venturing big time into development of stem cell therapies. Manipal Group has invested close to Rs 50 crore for research into stem cell therapy, the project’s chief scientific officer Satish Totey said.

    “Stem cell therapy has become a mainstream practice in eye care with huge research in for other areas. We are trying to develop new heart muscles and even a new heart out of stem cell which will help a country like India where burden of lifestyle diseases is very high,” noted cardiac surgeon and Asia Heart Foundation chairman Devi Shetty told ET. Reliance Life Science (RLS), which runs a cord blood repository in Navi Mumbai, is developing therapies to meet patient needs which have not been met.


    more:

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...ow/2749782.cms

  6. #1366
    Feb 1 2008 (Vol. 28, No. 3)

    Stem Cells Advance on Multiple Fronts

    Field Is Evolving Rapidly, and Many Firms Have Products Ready for the Clinic
    Elizabeth Lipp

    Last month investment banker John Scully and his wife, Regina, donated $20 million to the Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Hospital & Clinics to fund work on stem cells.

    The gift will help build a new facility to house research programs in stem cells and regenerative medicine at the medical school as well as build space at the new Stanford Hospital, where the results of this research may one day be applied to patients, according to Stanford officials.

    The news from Stanford represents the latest example of the continuing support for such a promising potential source of novel therapeutics. “The field has moved to a point where there are clinical proof-of-concept applications for the science,” says Robert Deans, Ph.D., svp at Athersys (www.athersys.com).



    more:

    http://www.genengnews.com/articles/c...id=2364&chid=4

  7. #1367
    Sales of Stem Cell Products Expected to Reach $87 Million in 2008, Leading Medical Industry Analyst Says

    Robin R. Young to Provide 10-Year Forecast at 3rd Annual Stem Cell Summit
    on Feb. 26

    Stem cell product sales in the United States totaled $36 million in 2007, a 119 percent increase from the previous year, and are expected to reach $87 million, a 144 percent increase, in 2008, according to Robin R. Young, CFA, a medical industry analyst ranked as one of The Wall Street Journal's "Best on the Street" and among Institutional Investor's top-10.

    The projections are based on Young's analysis of adult and human embryonic stem cell products currently sold or in development for the orthopedics, cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, diabetes, nerve repair and dental markets.


    more:

    http://www.individual.com/story.php?story=77106599

  8. #1368
    Don't Let John McCain Backtrack on Stem Cells

    By Brandon Keim February 01, 2008 | 4:51:22 PMCategories: 2008

    Presidential Election, Bioethics, Government, Stem Cell Research
    Republican Presidental candidate John McCain has long supported embryonic stem cell research, but he's under pressure from religious conservatives to drop that support in favor of unproven stem cell techniques.

    Lifenews.com reports that Senator Sam Brownback (R-Kansas), an outspoken opponent of embryonic stem cell (ESC) research, has asked McCain to abandon his ESC support.

    Harvesting ESCs involves the destruction of several-day-old human embryos, a process that Brownback and other religious conservatives consider to be murder.

    While McCain doesn't approve of making cloned embryos to generate the potentially disease-curing cells, he's voted to fund research on stem cells made from embryos that would otherwise be discarded during assisted reproduction.

    In November, scientists used a technique called reprogramming to create ESC-equivalents from skin cells. If the new cells prove medically viable, they'd be a controversy-free source of anticipated cures -- but that's a very big if. Currently, the procedure involves genetic modifications that leave the new cells prone to turning cancerous. It will take years to fix those problems; even then, the reprogrammed cells might not be able to do everything that ESCs are expected to do; and the two fields are mutually reinforcing, with knowledge generated in one helping to push the other forward.

    more:

    http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2...et-john-m.html

  9. #1369
    Senior Member Bhaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Kolkata, India
    Posts
    577

    Neurons for human brains developed

    The ITRC, Lucknow developed neurons for human brain cells. Hopefully, Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases will become curable. But scientists at ITRC maintain that ‘it is too early to say anything’. Stem cell research may cure dreaded diseases.

    IN WHAT IS considered as significant progress in stem cell research, the Lucknow-based Industrial Toxicological Research Centre (ITRC) has achieved success by developing neurons for human brain cells, raising hopes that the dreaded Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases may find cure.

    “It is too early to say anything”, says Dr. A.B. Pant, the scientist at the In-Vitro Toxicology Lab of ITRC adding, “We have succeeded in isolating stem cells from umbilical cord and trying to ascertain which of the gene gets affected with the pesticides”.

    This is for the first time that such a research has been initiated by one of the prestigious laboratories in India under the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR).

    “We have developed technology to grow and develop neurons and results might prove beneficial for treating diseases based on neuro-deficiencies and deformities”, Dr. Pant explained. “We are looking at which part of the brain in an embryo (foetus development) gets affected most and which of the particular area in the embryonic brain gets deformed by the ninth month of the pregnancy”, he said while speaking to Merinews.

    More : http://www.merinews.com/catFull.jsp?articleID=127766

  10. #1370
    Senior Member Bhaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Kolkata, India
    Posts
    577

    Frogs, Regeneration, & Transforming Growth Factor Beta 3

    Nature's tiny wonders heal human scars

    The secret powers of frogs are being exploited by scientists to create drugs that will correct disfiguring facial scars and could one day help in the regrowth of amputated arms and legs.

    The secret powers of frogs are being exploited by scientists to create drugs that will correct disfiguring facial scars and could one day help in the regrowth of amputated arms and legs.

    Manchester University researchers are exploiting the ability of some amphibians to regrow limbs. 'Human and amphibian proteins are very similar,' said one of the researchers, Professor Enrique Amaya. 'That means the lessons you learn from frogs and salamanders are applicable to humans. Their embryos - spawn - are also easier to study.'

    The Manchester work on tissue regeneration began 10 years ago, when Professor Mark Ferguson discovered most animals' embryos recover more fully from cuts than adult animals. The latter are often left scarred, but not embryos.

    More : http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/20...edicalresearch

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 105
    Last Post: 02-14-2007, 10:32 AM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-27-2006, 01:25 AM
  3. Republican Senate Leader Frist to back ESC research!
    By Donny247 in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 08-09-2005, 08:00 AM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-07-2002, 11:30 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •