Thread: Stem Cell Articles

  1. #1351
    Stem cell research wins New Mexico Senate nod
    By Associated Press
    Wednesday, January 30, 2008

    SANTA FE — For the second year in a row, a bill authorizing stem cell research on embryos in New Mexico was approved by the state Senate 20-18.

    The legislation, supported by Gov. Bill Richardson, would allow research only on embryos slated to be destroyed at fertility clinics.

    more:

    http://www.abqtrib.com/news/2008/jan...co-senate-nod/

  2. #1352
    CORD:USE Cord Blood Bank Announces the Addition of Dr. John Wagner, a Pioneer in the Use of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells, to Its Scientific Advisory Board



    ORLANDO, Fla., January 30, 2008 /PRNewswire/ -- John Wagner, M.D., recognized as a leader in the field of cord blood stem cell transplantation, has joined the team at CORD:USE Cord Blood Bank. Dr. Wagner's extensive experience and knowledge in transplant medicine and stem cell biology will provide a significant contribution to CORD:USE.

    more:

    http://www.pharmalive.com/News/Index...ticleid=510140

  3. #1353
    Stem Cell Coporation CEO Jeff Krstich Dies of Sudden Heart Attack; Chairman Kenneth C. Aldrich assumes CEO Role

    1/22/2008 @ 7:33 AM print this article - email to a friend - join our eNewsletter

    International Stem Cell Corporation (OTCBB:ISCO) (www.internationalstemcell.com), a California-based stem cell therapeutics company, announced today with great regret the untimely death of its CEO, Mr. Jeff Krstich. The Chairman of the Board, Kenneth C. Aldrich has assumed the additional responsibilities of Chief Executive Officer, effective immediately. Mr. Aldrich was one of the original founders of the Company and had been CEO until Mr. Krstich joined the Company as CEO in 2006.

    Mr. Krstich died of an apparent heart attack on January 20, 2008. He was 60 years old.


    more:

    http://www.freshnews.com/news/biotec...le_41704.html?

  4. #1354
    CORD:USE Cord Blood Bank Announces the Addition of Dr. John Wagner, a Pioneer in the Use of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells, to Its Scientific Advisory Board

    Wed Jan 30 15:09:23 2008


    ORLANDO, Fla., Jan. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- John Wagner, M.D., recognized as a leader in the field of cord blood stem cell transplantation, has joined the team at CORD:USE Cord Blood Bank. Dr. Wagner's extensive experience and knowledge in transplant medicine and stem cell biology will provide a significant contribution to CORD:USE.

    "We're honored and fortunate to have him as a member of our distinguished team," says Edward Guindi, M.D., President and CEO of CORD:USE Cord Blood Bank.

    Dr. Wagner is internationally recognized as an expert in the field of stem cells and use of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplant. He is a professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Hematology- Oncology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation at the University of Minnesota. He is also the Scientific Director of Clinical Research of the Stem Cell Institute and Director of the Center of Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics.

    more:

    http://www.omniomix.com/inthenews.php?id=89876

  5. #1355
    January 30, 2008

    A Visionary Approach Using Stem Cells to Repair Eye Damage
    New eye research center in India aims to fix visual impairments with the help of stem cells

    By Larry Greenemeier

    A new vision research center opening in India today becomes the latest in a handful of facilities dedicated to exploring the potential of adult eye stem cells to repair vision damage. The Champalimaud Center for Translation Eye Research (C-TRACER), part of the LV Prasad Eye Institute in Hyderabad, India, will continue research begun by LV Prasad scientists, who use eye stem cells from living adults to grow new cells that are then implanted into damaged

    The center's goal is to restore vision to some portion of the 65 million people worldwide—about 1 percent of the world population—considered to be legally blind, which the National Federation of the Blind defines as a central visual acuity of 20 / 200 or less in the stronger eye, even when aided by a corrective lens. Especially in developing countries in Africa and Asia, "most of these people are needlessly blind," says D. Balasubramanian, research director for both LV Prasad and the new facility.

    Some of these people have vision problems caused by currently untreatable diseases, he notes, but others simply because they cannot afford or do not have access to relatively simple fixes such as surgery to remove cataracts (clouding of eye lenses).

    more:

    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=...ell-eye-repair

  6. #1356
    Indian origin researcher highlights stem cell activation's role in bone repair

    Washington | January 28, 2008 5:21:59 PM IST

    A new study authored by an Indian origin researcher suggests that a medication, which is used to activate stem cells to treat bone marrow cancer, may also offer a potential therapy for osteoporosis.

    Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) writes that the medicine called bortezamib (Bzb) has been found to improve bone density in a mouse model of osteoporosis during experiments.

    The author says that the improvement might be attributable to the medicine's effect on the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which differentiate into several types of tissues.

    more:

    http://www.netindia123.com/showdetai...in+bone+repair

  7. #1357
    Senior Member Bhaskar's Avatar
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    Trials begin for fat StemCells / regen. heart attack study

    First Patients Treated in Cytori's Stem & Regenerative Cell Heart Attack Study
    SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Cytori Therapeutics (NASDAQ:CYTX) enrolled the first two patients in a clinical trial using adipose-derived stem and regenerative cells in the treatment of heart attack. In this trial, patients' cells are made available using Cytori's Celution™ System, a real-time cell processing device. One patient has been enrolled in each trial center, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon in Madrid, Spain, and Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

    Fat, known medically as adipose tissue, is one of the body's richest known sources of regenerative cells. Adipose-derived regenerative cells include adult stem cells in addition to other important cell types that have been shown to increase blood flow in and around damaged and oxygen deprived tissues. As a result, these cells hold exciting potential to revolutionize the treatment of heart disease, which affects millions of patients worldwide each year.

    More : http://www.businesswire.com/portal/s...42&newsLang=en

  8. #1358
    January 31, 2008

    BRCA1 mutation linked to breast cancer stem cells

    U-M research sheds light on why women with this gene mutation have higher risk of breast cancer

    Ann Arbor, MI – A new study may explain why women with a mutation in the BRCA1 gene face up to an 85 percent lifetime risk of breast cancer.

    Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center found that BRCA1 plays a role in regulating breast stem cells, the small number of cells that might develop into cancers.

    The study, in mice and in human breast cancer cells, found that BRCA1 is involved in the stem cells differentiating into other breast tissue cells. When BRCA1 is missing, the stem cells accumulate unregulated and develop into cancer.

    “Our data suggest that an important reason women with BRCA1 mutations get breast cancer is that BRCA1 is directly involved in the regulation of normal breast stem cells. In these women, loss of BRCA1 function results in the proliferation of breast stem cells. Since we believe that breast cancer may originate in these cells, this explains why these women have such a high incidence of breast cancer,” said senior study author Max S. Wicha, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Oncology and director of the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    The study, published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides strong support for the hypothesis that a small number of cells, called cancer stem cells, are responsible for fueling a tumor’s growth. Wicha’s lab was part of the team that first identified stem cells in human breast cancer in 2003.

    more:

    http://www.med.umich.edu/opm/newspage/2008/brca1.htm

  9. #1359
    Senior Member Bhaskar's Avatar
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    Impregnating Titanium Implants w/StemCell homing factors

    Porous structures help boost integration of host tissue with implants, study finds
    NEW YORK – Results published today in FASEB (the journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) by researchers at Columbia University, including Jeremy Mao of the Columbia College of Dental Medicine, demonstrate a novel way of using porous structures as a drug-delivery vehicle that can help boost the integration of host tissue with surgically implanted titanium.

    Instead of being acted upon by the body as an impenetrable foreign object, the synthetic bone replacement – currently being tested in rabbits – features a porous material that allows for the delivery of "microencapsulated bioactive cues" that speed up the growth of host tissue at the site and allow for the growth of new bone.

    A critical finding is that the drug dose needed for host tissue integration by this controlled-release approach is about 1/10 of that by the traditional technique of simple adsorption of the growth factor.

    More : http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-psh013008.php

  10. #1360
    Senior Member Bhaskar's Avatar
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    Adult StemCells for eye repair (Scientific American)

    A Visionary Approach Using Stem Cells to Repair Eye Damage
    New eye research center in India aims to fix visual impairments with the help of stem cells

    STEM CELL RESEARCH at the LV Prasad Eye Institute in Hyderabad, India, involves the generation of reparative tissue in the laboratory, which is used to replace damaged or diseased tissue. Courtesy of the LV Prasad Eye Institute A new vision research center opening in India today becomes the
    latest in a handful of facilities dedicated to exploring the potential of adult eye stem cells to repair vision damage. The Champalimaud Center for Translation Eye Research (C-TRACER), part of the LV Prasad Eye Institute in Hyderabad, India, will continue research begun by LV Prasad scientists, who use eye stem cells from living adults to grow new cells that are then implanted into damaged

    The center's goal is to restore vision to some portion of the 65 million people worldwide—about 1 percent of the world population—considered to be legally blind, which the National Federation of the Blind defines as a central visual acuity of 20 / 200 or less in the stronger eye, even when aided by a corrective lens. Especially in developing countries in Africa and Asia, "most of these people are needlessly blind," says D. Balasubramanian, research director for both LV Prasad and the new facility.

    More : http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=...ell-eye-repair

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