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Thread: Beware Sorbitol in foods and medicines

  1. #1
    Senior Member rdf's Avatar
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    Beware Sorbitol in foods and medicines

    Sorbitol is bad news. I've discovered the sugar-free gum I've been chewing for dry mouth contains sorbitol. I've had a few bouts of diarrhea in the past 6 months, and I couldn't figure out why. But I've been chewing 5 or 6 pieces of gum a day, gum which contains sorbitol. Sorbitol is even used in laxatives, so beware of what you're eating...it's especially prevalent in sugar-free foods and food for diabetics and dietetic foods.

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    The 10 g of sorbitol ingested would be equivalent to chewing 4 or 5 pieces of sugar-free gum in a short period of time. The significantly higher prevalence in nonwhites has not been explained.

    Sorbitol is present in a wide range of prescription and over-the-counter products. Historically, it has been used to induce catharsis, but currently it is also being used as a sweetener and for its humidifying and antihardening properties. The presence of sorbitol is commonly overlooked by physicians, however, despite multiple studies and case reports that have shown it to be a cause of abdominal symptoms.[1-8] The Physicians' Desk Reference,[9] which is widely used as a source of drug information, does not always list sorbitol as an active or inactive ingredient when present, and when sorbitol is fisted, the concentration is not always specified.

    Sorbitol is found naturally in a variety of fruits and plants, and is used commercially in a wide range of products. It is a popular sugar substitute in dietetic foods, especially sugar-free chewing gum and mints. Sorbitol is present in over-the-counter medications such as liquid acetaminophen, vitamins, and cough preparations. Prescription elixirs also frequently contain sorbitol. Examples include theophyline, cimetidine, codeine, isoniazid, lithium, and valproic acid.

    The above studies indicate that sorbitol intolerance is not uncommon. Patients who consume products containing sorbitol are at risk for experiencing sorbitol-induced abdominal symptoms. Diabetics frequently consume large amounts of sugar-free products. A study done by Badiga et al[3] showed that diarrhea is significantly more prevalent in diabetics who consume sorbitol-containing foods compared with diabetics who do not consume these products. Patients for whom medications in elixir form are prescribed, including pediatric, geriatric, and patients with severe chronic disabilities, are also at increased risk.
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  2. #2

    Angry Well aware of Sorbitol's Effects

    After Visiting a friend's House and Eating some candy I soon found out What Harm Sorbitol can do. It was not until a few weeks later that I tracked down the source to the candy I was eating. My Bowel movements became uncontrollable and had an orange oily smell. I thought I had stomach cancer or something. After thinking it must be something I ate went back thinking of any new foods.... after realizing it was simply the candy with sorbitol I was shocked , angry and amazed how The FDA Allows this stuff on the market...We are being sickened by everyday foods that should be safe to eat.... and Sorbitol is not at all safe and unnatural.
    PS. MSG Is another chemical that should be called the sleeping pill additive.

  3. #3
    Senior Member michaelm's Avatar
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    As soon as I stopped eating that crap, my bloating went down.

  4. #4
    LOL, I ate like 4 pieces of candy at the NUTRITIONIST'S OFFICE!!! You'd think you'd be safe there! I was doing laundry and laundry and laundry, omg that one sucked! I knew it was that candy, husband said I was crazy.

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