Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: What do I need?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by sjean423
    These things could easily be done by a teenager. Most of the jobs that they get pay minimun wage or a bit higher, so I would think you could hire one for $8-$10 an hour. Depending on the teen, they might be very efficient as to house/yard care, or may need a lot of direction, but be willing to follow it. (Of of course totally incompetant and lazy, but in that case you don't want to hire them ..... lol).

    ps .... just asked my daughter if I was on track with this suggestion, and she specifically mentioned a 15 year old. They can't get a "real" job (at least in Connecticut) so are limited to babysitting, lawnmowing, etc. An untapped market, so to speak.
    I am kind of highjacking here but my question does tie into this thread. And maybe the answer would be helpful for Cris.

    I recently had to fire the person I had coming in to do the household chores that my caregivers don't do. I had hired her through an agency and it was nothing but headaches. Because I really only need this kind of help a few hours a week and the hours sometimes need to be flexible, I thought it would be a perfect job for a student.

    My concerns about this, and I thought about it because sjean mentioned 15 year olds, are you putting yourself at extra risk for liability hiring someone that young? Or even anybody under 18? The kinds of things they would be doing would not involve personal care at all, but I still wonder about that. I guess I worry about them getting hurt while cleaning in my apartment or out doing an errand for me. If I hire from an agency, the agency covers Worker's Compensation in case of injury. I realize that this will vary from place to place, but what do the rest of you who hire privately do about this? I am guessing I could pay the premiums myself to cover anybody I hire, but that would be very expensive and for the hours I need somebody, likely not worth the cost. I am still trying to decide what to do, but I would rather hire a student who needs a job than tell the agency to send me somebody else. The risk seems low when they are just going to be doing things like vaccuming but I still worry.

    One more thing...

    About the wage issue, my need for this kind of help varies sometimes from week to week. I was thinking of offering a monthly salary instead of paying by the hour to help keep the pay regular even if there might be less hours some weeks. Does anybody else do this? If so, does it work for you.

    Sorry to bring my personal situation into this. But maybe some general responses will be helpful for others too.
    Last edited by orangejello; 06-17-2007 at 02:45 PM.

  2. #12
    O.J.
    I usually offer per hour, for a set number of hours, knowing I usually finish early. Especially for anything less than 4 hours, it would be little incentive to travel (esp. if far) to work, paying gas/busfare, for just an hour or two of work.

    So, an example: if getting $10 per hour, for 4 hours, pay up to $40 per work-shift, from any work from 1-4 hours, then more for over-time, or as needed.

    Or, a weekly salary? My thought is, that many, doing this type of low-skilled work, especially if sporadic and intermittent, consistent pay is good, but more frequent pay may be helpful - weekly or every two weeks.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by chick
    O.J.
    I usually offer per hour, for a set number of hours, knowing I usually finish early. Especially for anything less than 4 hours, it would be little incentive to travel (esp. if far) to work, paying gas/busfare, for just an hour or two of work.

    So, an example: if getting $10 per hour, for 4 hours, pay up to $40 per work-shift, from any work from 1-4 hours, then more for over-time, or as needed.

    Or, a weekly salary? My thought is, that many, doing this type of low-skilled work, especially if sporadic and intermittent, consistent pay is good, but more frequent pay may be helpful - weekly or every two weeks.
    Thanks Chick, what you describe is actually closer to what I was thinking in my mind than how I worded it in my post. By a monthly salary I was thinking of a guarantee they would be paid a set minimum each month, regardless if some shifts were shorter than planned. But I was having a problem figuring out the logistics of that in terms of minimum/maximum hours, over time, and how frequently to pay. Plus the months never break down nicely into four week blocks so that was wrecking my math lol.

    I think your example of paying for a set number of hours per shift is a good one. Definately much easier than messing around with a monthly or even a weekly figure. I think I am going to give that a try.

  4. #14
    O.J.
    I'm not sure about workers comp for private agencies, but I know that many, which I've had to deal with (esp. recently), do not hire many experienced and/or trained workers for basic care (personal/home), often paying them just the bare minimum while billing you/insurance for much more. But regarding liability, that is something to really read fine print on, and knowing what/whose responsibilities are. I had discussions with a few private agencies, needing BP care, which many did not have/allow. I am willing to train, so have offered that, including signing any liability waivers, since I would be taking on the responsibility to train and manage my care, which would be outside the bounds of the agency. Anyway, haven't done this yet (hired thru agency), but just part of what I've been discussing with them, looking for care and giving as much info I can to agencies so they know what I need and what obligations/responsibilities I'm willing to taken on personally, to relieve them of obligation so they can find someone faster. Had a few agencies act faster on my behalf this way. Plus, good to build good relationships with them, so if ever you do need someone, you have ready contact of people more invested in assisting you. (I've spoken with one woman from an agency recently, who I will not be using, but who has been wanting to meet me in person, esp. cuz she has a sis currently in rehab so particularly interested in/about me, I guess. I called for help, but am now assisting her with her questions/concerns. Funny how roles change, but it's cool ... *whew* talk about ramble! )

    Along the same lines, I try to make clear what the responsibilities are to workers, and I like to write up list of work duties, etc. to give pca's so they are clear on job tasks, etc.. Any person I hire on my own, I assure them, that whatever they do for me, will be my responsibility (even if they injured me, which has happened [minor]...but don't create worry about potential injury, which may just create undue fears/apprehension), but I've never had to deal with the workers being injured on the job. I have however, warned about hazards, such as lifting, transfers, and back issues, to make sure they are aware of potential issues and if willing to take them on. Never prepared/signed any legal documents for employer/employee rights and obligations, etc. but interested if any others have. I would assume that much of what people do about health costs for workers, would be an individual thing - the type of relationship, whatever roles/obligations have been outlined/determined at the outset, the compassion/conscious of the employer, etc.

  5. #15
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    3,399
    Just a tossed out thing ... don't pay under the table. It can really, really get you in trouble. It is a huge PITA to pay legit, but it is worth it. It's not all that much more $$ wise, but it is alot of paperwork. We've also found the added benefit that you tend to get more honest and reliable people by only paying "over" the table. I am not at all saying that people paid under the table are less capable, its just that in our experience, there can often be a reason someone wants to be paid under the table - and if they get in trouble with the IRS for being paid that way, it is you who is in the hottest water.

    So, bite the bullet, and withhold/pay taxes. I have only been around 3-1/2 years with the PCA thing with Chad, but he's been at it 19 years and he says he'd never pay under the table now knowing what he does after so long of hiring PCAs.
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

  6. #16
    Senior Member taj2002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    172
    I agree with Ami 100%. We pay above the table always. We withhold taxes, pay state unemployment taxes, pay the employer matching FICA, etc. It just takes one pissed off PCA or housekeeper to turn you in to the IRS then big trouble will come your way.

    Also, we have had an agency nurse get hurt at our house. She got her thumb stuck in our van lift (operator error, not van life malfunction). She had to have surgery on her hand to reattach the tip of her thumb. She was covered under her agencies Workman’s Comp policy.

    We have some agency nurses plus some private hires. Because of this, we carry an umbrella liability policy in case someone gets hurt at our house. Maybe we are paranoid, but you have to be careful these days.

    Trish

  7. #17
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    5,899
    Cris,

    You might try contacting the Florida Spinal Cord Injury Resource Center in Tampa -- Phone: 813-844-4286 / 813-844-4287 Toll-Free: 800-995-8544 or Online: http://www.fscirc.org

    If you do start working, Florida has a program that will pay for PCAs for quads making less than $60k. I met a guy in Tampa who uses the service, and an old quad acquaintance of mine, Dan Casady, is directing it. he's also the former director of the FSCIRC (above).

    If you hire help, you don't necessarily need to withold Income Tax and FICA. Hire them as a "freelancer" meaning they will be responsible for their own taxes, and you just file a 1099 form showing what you paid, and give them a W-2. This is how my design clients pay me, and then I'm responsible for my taxes. I don't think it's necessary to do their witholding, etc. But you can always discuss this with an accountant or financial advisor, if you'd feel more comfortable doing that.
    Last edited by Scorpion; 06-18-2007 at 12:46 AM.

  8. #18
    Senior Member taj2002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    172
    Quote Originally Posted by Scorpion
    If you hire help, you don't necessarily need to withold Income Tax and FICA. Hire them as a "freelancer" meaning they will be responsible for their own taxes, and you just file a 1099 form showing what you paid, and give them a W-2. This is how my design clients pay me, and then I'm responsible for my taxes. I don't think it's necessary to do their witholding, etc. But you can always discuss this with an accountant or financial advisor, if you'd feel more comfortable doing that.
    If you look at the IRS definitions, health aids by definition are considered household employees and thus as their employer you should withhold and do all the employer matching. The work you describe for yourself would fall under the “non-household definition” which does not require this.

    Household employee definition: You have a household employee if you hired someone to do household work and that worker is your employee. The worker is your employee if you can control not only what work is done, but how it is done. If the worker is your employee, it does not matter whether the work is full time or part time or that you hired the worker through an agency or from a list provided by an agency or association. It also does not matter whether you pay the worker on an hourly, daily, or weekly basis, or by the job. (Examples: Baby-sitters, Cleaning people, Drivers, Housekeepers, Nannies, Health aides, Private nurses, Maids, Caretakers, Yard workers, Similar domestic workers)

    Freelance/non-household employee definition: If only the worker can control how the work is done, the worker is not your employee but is self-employed. A self-employed worker usually provides his or her own tools and offers services to the general public in an independent business. A worker who performs child care services for you in his or her home generally is not your employee. If an agency provides the worker and controls what work is done and how it is done, the worker is not your employee.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    5,899
    Quote Originally Posted by taj2002
    It also does not matter whether you pay the worker on an hourly, daily, or weekly basis, or by the job. (Examples: Baby-sitters, Cleaning people, Drivers, Housekeepers, Nannies, Health aides, Private nurses, Maids, Caretakers, Yard workers, Similar domestic workers)
    But all of those people can also be self-employed, as I imagine a PCA could be. A PCA could easily fall under "contract work". This stuff isn't black & white.

    If in doubt, one should talk to an accountant or something, like I said. I just think some of what you guys are talking about is overkill, and filing a 1099 should suffice.

    But hey, everyone should do what they're most comfortable with.

    We just need to switch to a Federal sales tax and eliminate all this crap.

  10. #20
    You never know when you might want to run for President or try to get appointed the the Supreme Court ....best to comply with both SS and IRS regulations in this area.

    We recommend a book keeping service that will take care of all the needed withholding, etc. if they want to manage their PCA payments this way. That is what we advise our clients. If they choose not to, that is their business.

    (KLD)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •