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Thread: What do you have to lose?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Honcho
    I was the 3rd American to undergo Dr. Huang's procedure. Given the exact same circumstances, I would make the same decision to do it again every day of the week and twice on Sunday.
    This is precisely what I am referring to. You should only have to undergo a therapy once.
    No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Tufelhunden
    This is precisely what I am referring to. You should only have to undergo a therapy once.
    Your wait is going to be even longer if you're hoping to have one "cure" procedure that gets you back all of the function you hope for. Many quads like me would gladly undergo a therapy now to get the function of a para, even if it meant having to wait another few years for a more effective treatment. Some paras (and ABs) don't get that.

    I didn't say I would do the therapy every day of the week, but that I would make the same decision I made in 2003. At that time, 1) I had the money, 2) I didn't have a job so time wasn't an issue, and 3) I had no spouse or children. I'm also not saying I would have that same surgery today, mainly there are more known variables and my life has changed. Am I going to wait decades until I have another procedure? Hell no.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Honcho
    Your wait is going to be even longer if you're hoping to have one "cure" procedure that gets you back all of the function you hope for. Many quads like me would gladly undergo a therapy now to get the function of a para, even if it meant having to wait another few years for a more effective treatment. Some paras (and ABs) don't get that.

    I didn't say I would do the therapy every day of the week, but that I would make the same decision I made in 2003. At that time, 1) I had the money, 2) I didn't have a job so time wasn't an issue, and 3) I had no spouse or children. I'm also not saying I would have that same surgery today, mainly there are more known variables and my life has changed. Am I going to wait decades until I have another procedure? Hell no.
    Mike Honcho:

    I didn't mean to sound condescending to you at all. If you refer to my original post I mentioned that not all of us are in the same boat and everyone is on a different train going at different speeds and in different directions as far as patience and relative position in life goes. If you took my post as an attack or adversarial, that was not the intent, so for that, I sincerely apologize. As a libertarian, my foremost belief is that those of us who are rational are completely free to do with our lives what we like.

    However, as a social scientist, I am fully aware of how the classical scientific method works and it would be ignorant of me to not differentiate between methods with statistical control, and those which are uncontrolled.

    The whole of our scientific knowledge, especially in medicine, is built in this very manner. So if we are going to expect more results from surgical interventions in the future, rigorous follow-up and clinical trials are just as important, if not more important than the method being tested.
    No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

  4. #14
    I probably sounded too defensive, but that wasn't my intent. I know it wasn't an attack by you, but waiting for a single procedure for a cure, as defined by Dr. Young and others in his field, isn't for everybody. Some prefer the chance of incremental gains.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by etexley
    Doctor, one thing that we need to remember in the case of the ambulation training is that all the time that these individuals spent trying to improve their neurology...even if they saw no neurological improvements...they spent on their feet!

    The physiological benefits of being vertical weight-bearing are countless. From circulation, to chronic wound healing, to muscle size, to the psychological aspect of being "tall" again.

    Recovery from a spinal injury is a gradual, life-long persuit. Whether or not a biological treatment with a measurable, predictable outcome becomes available, I don't believe there will ever be a "magic bullet."
    etexley, I agree. I guess that whatever example that I give, I would be in danger of somebody interpreting my example to mean that I think that treatment is no good. I was giving this example because it is long enough ago that it may no longer be controversial for most people on CareCure.

    At the time that this was being done (1981-1983), many people had moved to Cottonwood and had spent months and some even spent years there, doing their exercises. They exhorted each other on and the camraderie was quite impressive. I had several friends who went.

    The idea of walking to walk again was very controversial at the time. Many doctors thought that it was a waste of time. I did not think so. In fact, I was quite impressed by the gains of some people. Of course, today, we are used to seeing people walk after spinal cord injury. "Walking quads" were unusual in those days.

    Some people chose between Cottonwood and other activities such as school. They postponed their lives in order to spend the time exercising. I was simply making the point that time is valuable and that one should not throw it away. For some, I am sure that it was worth it. For others, I am not so sure.

    Wise.

  6. #16
    "we are used to seeing people walk after spinal cord injury" ???
    Glider

  7. #17
    Once you're paralyzed, you're instantly a burden, not to mention
    physically useless.

    So I don't blame anyone for losing patience and doing what they can
    to restore some function, even if the risks include death.

    Who wants to be an invalid for the rest of their life?

  8. #18
    Don't you think those words are a little strong, Buck?

    I mean grant it, I probably won't win the Golden Gloves again, but invalid?
    No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Tufelhunden
    Don't you think those words are a little strong, Buck?

    I mean grant it, I probably won't win the Golden Gloves again, but invalid?
    I don't think so. The word "invalid" really sums up our condition.

    I wish it didn't, but that's the way it goes.

    Golden Gloves! That's one hell of an achievment.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Kratos's Avatar
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    in croatia there is only one word for poeple like us (SCI) INVALID.

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