View Poll Results: How frequently do you get urinary tract infections (more than a year after injury)?

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  • Rarely (once every couple of years or more)

    45 29.03%
  • Occasionally (once every year or two)

    37 23.87%
  • Regularly (2-3 times a year)

    31 20.00%
  • Often (more than 3 times year)

    42 27.10%
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Thread: How often do you get UTI's and what is the meaning of no gas

  1. #21
    I have an indwelling cath and a tendency to develop stones, so my urologist has me change my cath often; which im sure is part of the reason i get so many uti's. Luckily, they are rarely accompanied by any symptoms (the only real indicator is visual or smell) which allows me to at least attempt to clear them up without having to use antibiotics (I have a fear of becoming resistant).

  2. #22
    I have an SP tube and for several years I thought I was getting UTI's all the time without being feverish or anything. I quit taking antibiotics a long time ago because I'm never feverish, but now my year and has a lot of sentiment in it so I flushed every night with saline so that it doesn't clog my catheter every week.
    C-5/6, 7-9-2000
    Scottsdale, AZ

    Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

  3. #23
    Thanks for the detailed explanation, Wise, it was quite interesting and a lot fits together with what I've learned through experience. It's amazing that whatever part of the body one picks, there is a world of things to know about it (and probably even more about it that's unknown!).
    - Richard

  4. #24
    Senior Member StevieP's Avatar
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    My first two years after I was injured I had no UTI's then the third year I got maybe 2 or 3, I have not had one yet this year so far. I take a regiment of Nitrofurun (spelling) and 4 Cranactin a day as well using a new catheter every time that is in a closed sterile system. What has really helped me is to use on my hands Purell every time I cath.

    As far as passing gas it happens almost all the time when I am laying down. I don't know if it is just relaxed position.

    Is there any reason for that Dr Young?


    Stevie P

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by StevieP
    My first two years after I was injured I had no UTI's then the third year I got maybe 2 or 3, I have not had one yet this year so far. I take a regiment of Nitrofurun (spelling) and 4 Cranactin a day as well using a new catheter every time that is in a closed sterile system. What has really helped me is to use on my hands Purell every time I cath.

    As far as passing gas it happens almost all the time when I am laying down. I don't know if it is just relaxed position.

    Is there any reason for that Dr Young?


    Stevie P
    Stevie,

    Nitrofurantoin is an antibiotic. Commercial names include Macrobid, macrodantin furadantin. It is effective in suppressing bacterial growth in urinary tract infections and has been used for this purpose since the 1960's (Source). It is said to be effective against many bacteria that are resistant to third or even fourth generation antibiotics (Source).

    Last year, Salomon, et al. (2006) reported that weekly oral cyclic antibiotics (given once a week for 2 years) significantly reduced the consumption of other antibiotics and the incidence of urinary tract infections. They studied 38 patients with neurogenic bladders from spinal cord injury. Before they started this treatment, the patients had an average of 9.4 symptomatic UTI's per patient-year, including 197 episodes of febrile UTI's. After the intervention started, there was only 1.8 symptomatic UTI's per patient-year and only 19 epidoses of febrile UTI. They found no adverse events and no new cases of colonization with multi-drug resistant bacteria. This is quite an impressive result. After having seen these results, I think that I would recommend this treatment for people who have UTI's per year.

    Regarding flatus when lying down, I am not sure why. I suspect that what happens is that the anal canal relaxes to allow gas to pass through only when the pressure in the rectum is not very high. I really don't know how the rectum knows when it is filled with gas and not stools. The fact that it occurs when you are lying down suggests some kind of mechanical effect.

    Wise.

    P.S. for those who want a copy of the paper, I attach a pdf copy

  6. #26
    Senior Member spidergirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antiquity
    spider, since it sounds like you have overflow incontinence, do you really need to cath? you can pretty much end your uti's if you stop cathing. the crede technique involves gently pressing on the area above your pubic bone, where your bladder is, to empty it. i won't need to urinate for at least 4 hours afterwards. you'll have to wear protective inserts but it beats having active infections all of the time and the stress that puts on your immune system. other than that, i'd suggest a suprapubic.
    I am sorry I am confused on do I really need to cath part? How else would I cath? Suprapubic...nah I am an all natural girl.

  7. #27
    Senior Member spidergirl's Avatar
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    Thank-you this makes a lot of sense. Actually the only thing that actually goes right in my injury is my bowl program which I do every morning like clockwork and I never have any kind of liquids so I think I am fine in that department. I had 1 bowl accident during my injury in rehab and it was because of a Portillos Hot Dog. Well, I never ate a hot-dog again.

    I still need to figure out the UTI situation. I know there is a remedy out there for me and I will find it somehow someway because everyone and every BODY is different. Anyone that uses an indwelling cath...well that would not pertain to me.


    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    The "bowel programs" taught at most rehabilitation centers (Source) usually begin with the insertion of a suppository or a mini enema, waiting 15-20 minutes, and then digital stimulation every 10-15 minutes until the rectum is empty. To avoid injury to the rectum, no more than 4 such stimulation should be done in any given session. Those with flaccid bowels typically do not use enemas or suppositories. Regular use of stimulant laxatives (such as dulcolax, ex-lax, full-sized Fleet's enema etc.) should be limited to no more than several times a month, in order to avoid development of stimulus-dependent or "lazy" bowel.

    A 1996 study by the Aarhus Hospital in Denmark (Source) suggested that only 19% of 424 people with spinal cord injury felt the urge to defecate and that the remainder experienced abdomenal discomfort, headaches and other signs of autonomic dysautonomia, when they needed to go. About 75% of the people report having fecal incontinence; 15% had a few episode each month while 56% had a few episodes a year. Overall, 39% said that colorectal dsyfunction caused major restriction on social activities and quality of life and 30% regarded it as being worse than both bladder and sexual dysfunction.

    Summarizing an overlong post, inability to pass gas suggests anal sphincter spasticity. It does not imply "transected spinal cord". Your spinal cord that controls the anal canal is definitely alive and kicking. The system is influenced by many factors including your bowel program and what drugs you may be taking. Antidepressants that increase serotonin, for example, may increase the sphinncter activity whereas serotonin blockers relaxes the sphincter. Likewise, cholinergic and adrenergic receptor drugs may affect the system. Alpha adrenergic receptor agonist may increase sphincter tone; for example, the commonly used anti-spasticity drug tizanidine may increase sphincter tone (Source).

  8. #28
    Senior Member spidergirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Honcho
    I haven't had a UTI since I left Craig almost 6 years ago.
    Incomplete quads are night and day compared to complete paras. Lucky you.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by spidergirl
    Incomplete quads are night and day compared to complete paras. Lucky you.
    Yeah. I feel so lucky. My little hands are clapping
    C5/6 incomplete

    "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

  10. #30
    Senior Member keps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spidergirl
    Incomplete quads are night and day compared to complete paras. Lucky you.
    Well I'm a complete para and haven't had a UTI since my injury.
    And I've got to cath up to 10 times a day.

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