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Thread: "How come you're not all shriveled up?"

  1. #41
    Senior Member Van Quad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leschinsky

    Definitely not shriveled up!

  2. #42
    Senior Member Timaru's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leschinsky
    How did I miss that?

    Great legs and it doesn't stop there!

  3. #43
    thank you boys *curtsy*
    Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelieboy
    That was the question I was asked today from one of my former nurses at the Shepherd Center who I happened to run into today.

    My response was simply, "huh?" She said, "you know what I mean. Look at the people you see coming in and out of here. You see they have skinny little bodies and legs. Your legs look muscular and normal and you have an upper body." Then my old doctor walks by at that exact moment and says, "what's up, big guy?" Then she says, "see what I mean?"

    Is the medical expectation everyone with a SCI "shrivels up" over time? I know people lose some mass, but I never figured they "shrivel up." Do any of you guys and gals out there ever feel "all shriveled up?" I wasn't botherd by the nurse's question, but moreso curious in regard to the observation. Perhaps in my case it's just genetics and a good gym workout here and there. I'm just askin'.....
    I get/gotten that before. It seems fairly non-offensive IMO but I catch the 'big fella' nickname off of virtually everyone thats opened a door, watched me drop something etc etc...seems to be the fitting nickname.
    My legs have wasted awefully slow over the last 9 years and Im built like a small tank... at the end of the day it beats being the little fella.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Myc0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelieboy
    That was the question I was asked today from one of my former nurses at the Shepherd Center who I happened to run into today.
    I wouldn't take it personally, but that is a very tactless, stupid question for her to ask. I have to wonder if that was the same nurse I had to deal with at Sheperd. She was a rude bitch that needed a slap upside the head and some sensitivity training, not that I still hold a grudge or anything...
    De Omnibus Dubitandum

  6. #46
    I may know the exact nurse???
    If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


    Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

  7. #47
    Unfortunately, those who should know better, don't act like it. A couple years ago, I had a "nurse" tell me at least once a week that I shouldn't be alive, and she was an RN.

    Due to some surgeries on one of my legs, it is smaller than the other, but both are in good shape. People have told me they think my legs are my best feature. Spasms can be annoying at times, but they do help in keeping some resemblence of normalcy.

    As for nurses that say such things, they should return to training in how to behave. I've had the opportunity to speak to nursing student classes, but not enough yet.
    C2/3 quad since February 20, 1985.

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Myc0
    I wouldn't take it personally, but that is a very tactless, stupid question for her to ask.
    Nah, I didn't take it personal since it wasn't offensive towards me. Now some of those "shriveled" people she was referring to probably would have been a bit miffed had they heard her.

    Addie - Me thinks you may know of whom it I speak, eh? You know I never name names on this site, but you probably do know her since there aren't that many nurse SCI educators there who are female.

    I've come to discover that people get very comfortable over time when dealing with certain situations and just forget NOT to say what they are truly thinking. She did ask me to come back and speak to the patients about life on the outside since I was doing so well. She said they had the "doom and gloom" attitude and needed to see someone injured but being positive. I declined as I am surviving, but not turning cartwheels over this. Most people will have that "gloomy" attitude while inpatient after a SCI and me saying "I'm in a wheelchair and look how well I'm doing" probably wouldn't bode to well with them. I know it didn't work with me when I was inpatient. That's just my take.

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