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Thread: HyperMED Australia - Anyone heard of these?

  1. #1

    Question HyperMED Australia - Anyone heard of these?

    http://www.spinalrehab.com.au/index.htm

    These people claim to help with SCI (amongst other conditions) using hyperbaric Oxygenation | Stem Cell Therapies | Regenerative Medicine | LOKOMAT - ROBOTIC GAIT ASSISTED WALKING

    The site is different from other claiming to be able to do the same as it gives research papers as well as patient testimonials and details of their conditions before and after the treatment.

    They also provide their address and contact details on their main page.

    Anyone been in contact with these? What does Dr Wise think?

  2. #2
    Senior Member lurch's Avatar
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    Just after I was realeased from hospital I spent some time with these guys getting hyperbaric treatments.They didn't have the lokomat back then.
    The process didn'r result in any functional return for me but MRIs suggested that the HBOT had a positive effect on small syringomyelia that had appeared.

  3. #3
    I am also considering going to HyperMed mainly because they would give us the opportunity to combine the Lokomat and the Hyperbaric. We have tried both therapies indepentantly already with some positivity on both counts. I have attached a costing sheet I received from them. The Hyperbaric Center in Dublin offers a session for 50 euro for children and you can go into the chamber with the child. Last time we were there a young baby was going in and they set up a special time for the baby as the decompression rate was smaller and the length of time was different for babies. PM me and I can send you their details.

    Your little fella is only 15 months old. I think he would be too small for the Lokomat. You have to have a femer lenght of at least 21cm according to manufacturers. I have no idea how much a Hyperbaric session are in the UK but definitley Dublin would be cheaper than OZ. Don't have the weather but do have the Guinness

  4. #4
    Dr.Young,

    In regards to a person that is anticipating a cure and is trying to keep their body in good shape for a cure,what do you recommend would be an appropriate amount of times to conduct lokomat sessions per week? 1-2? Thanks.

  5. #5
    The Lokomat is an expensive piece of equipment that presumably will have the same or similar effect as weight-suppored treadmill training with FES. As such, I think that it should have some effects. Most of the data on weight-supported treadmill training suggests that the effect is dose-related and the best results are associated with daily use. This may be difficult and take too much time.

    Regarding hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO), I am afraid that there is no convincing evidence HBO has any beneficial effects on neurological function in people with chronic spinal cord injury. It may be justifiable if one has a decubitus and wanted more rapidly healing. I do not recommend it.

    Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBaron
    http://www.spinalrehab.com.au/index.htm

    These people claim to help with SCI (amongst other conditions) using hyperbaric Oxygenation | Stem Cell Therapies | Regenerative Medicine | LOKOMAT - ROBOTIC GAIT ASSISTED WALKING

    The site is different from other claiming to be able to do the same as it gives research papers as well as patient testimonials and details of their conditions before and after the treatment.

    They also provide their address and contact details on their main page.

    Anyone been in contact with these? What does Dr Wise think?

  6. #6
    Thank you Dr Young.

    Regards HBO, do you not recommend it because you think it is useless and a waste of time and money, or because it may also or even be harmful?

    Excuse my ignorance, but what is a "decubitus"? Is it an injury such as bone fracture or even a wound?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    The Lokomat is an expensive piece of equipment that presumably will have the same or similar effect as weight-suppored treadmill training with FES. As such, I think that it should have some effects. Most of the data on weight-supported treadmill training suggests that the effect is dose-related and the best results are associated with daily use. This may be difficult and take too much time.

    Regarding hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO), I am afraid that there is no convincing evidence HBO has any beneficial effects on neurological function in people with chronic spinal cord injury. It may be justifiable if one has a decubitus and wanted more rapidly healing. I do not recommend it.

    Wise.

  7. #7
    Baron, I Googled decubitus.

    "The terms decubitus ulcer and pressure sore often are used interchangeably in the medical community."

  8. #8
    Junior Member
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    I have just been on the phone to Dr Mal Hooper of Hypermed.
    I will be in Melbourne next Friday just 2 blocks from there, so my husband and I are going to take a look. Before then I plan to read what they have on their site and do some wider research.

    When I was speaking to him he mentioned all the above. First impressions, I was impressed.... but really I am reserving judgement.

    Has anyone tried Lokomot with success?

    I am on a treadmill twice a week, with slow painful improvements my injury is T7 incomplete.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
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    Lokomat

    I tried Lokomat for about a year and found it helped build up my hip flexors, allowing me to take longer strides. It's a lot more comfortable than using a treadmilll with a harness because your hip and legs are surrounding by the robot which means your weight is more evenly supported.

    Downsides of Lokomat are: it's expensive and the patient doesn't control the speed - so it feels more like you are being walked rather than you are doing the walking yourself.

    I now practice walking in the pool which - I think - is just as good as good as Lokomat, particularly if you have a therapist to advise you on gait pattern.

  10. #10
    At the Summer School in Vienna, a meeting that I just went to, attended by many of the world's top rehabilitation doctors, locomotor experts, and biologists (interested in spinal cord injury injury therapies), there were many interesting discussion concerning the role of robotic walking versus overground volitional walking.

    There were some people who felt that the latter is better than the former, that simply getting the legs to move or even FES for training the muscles may not be taking advantage of the "learning" that the spinal cord is capable of and must do in order to recover locomotor control. There was widespread enthusiasm about the potential use of subthreshold L2 stimulation to stimulate and enhance locomotor activity, as well as pharmacological means of doing this as well.

    Several investigators believed that overground walking was necessary and that the lokomat is the first step in a process that eventually ends up with overground locomotor training.

    Wise.

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