Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Head Transplant

  1. #1

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Ozymandias
    About once a year, somebody would ask me about head transplants and Dr.
    white. He had a volunteer patient who wanted to have his head transplanted to the body of a brain-dead patient. In my opinion, these experiments are inappropriate. If one does animal experiments, it must be with one's best efforts to learn something from the experiments.

    Dr. White did these experiments knowing that head transplant would not reconnect neurologically with the body. He did not address the question of immune rejection or reconnection of the spinal cord. He showed that it is possible to keep the brain alive with extracorporeal circulation.

    I don't see a justification for these experiments and what was learned.

    Wise.

  3. #3
    “If everybody's thinking alike, somebody isn't thinking.” Gen. Patton

  4. #4
    DENVER, Colo. -- Miracles do happen. That's what doctors said about 30-year-old Shannon Malloy.A car crash in Nebraska on Jan. 25 threw Malloy up against the vehicle's dashboard. In the process, her skull became separated from her spine. The clinical term for her condition is called internal decapitation.
    http://www.thedenverchannel.com/heal...33/detail.html

  5. #5

    By the way, there is no such term as "internal decapitation". I think that the reporter made it up. I have been in the field a long long time and have never heard this term published, used, or attributed in any way before this article. The claim that this woman's head nearly separated from the body without all the uscles and blood vessels of the neck tearing is simply not credible.

    I have actually seen an actual case of almost complete decapitation. This was a Chinese general who had been mistakenly attacked by a soldier with a sharp knife. The man approached the general from behind, reached with the right arm over the general's right shoulder across to the left side of the neck and cut from left to right. He severed both carotid arteris (located in deep in the neck about 3 cm), the left vertebral artery (located next to the spine), and cut three-quarters of the C3/4 spinal cord, leaving on the right lateral column (if my memory serves me correctly).

    Because three of four of the blood vessels to the brain were cut and could not be saved, this man had an infarct of his left hemisphere. Miraculously, his right hemisphere survived and, when I examined him, his eyes were able to follow me and he was able to hear my verbal commands. His body was paralyzed and quite spastic. He was unable to move any of the limbs on command although, from his facial expression, it was clear that he understood and wanted to try. Because he damaged his left (dominant) hemisphere, he could not speak but was able to make sounds. He was quite spastic in both arms and legs. When I tried to bend his arm, the arm resisted the movement with extensor rigidity. He had strong postiive Babinsky responses. It was unclear whether he could feel but he definitely did not squeeze my fingers when I put them on his left and right hands. I was hopeful that he might have some ability to squeeze his right hand because he still had an intact right lateral column, even though his left hemisphere was severely damaged.

    Dr. Hongyun Huang tranplanted olfactory ensheathing glia into his spinal cord, above and below the injury site. The day after surgery, he was sweating on on his back (a common occurrence). I couldn't be sure but he seemed to have less spasticity. On the second day after surgery, his spasticity is definitely less, particularly in his left arm. He no longer had extensor rigidity although he had hyper-reflexia. His Babinsky reflex was also subdued, occurring only with fairly strong scratching stimulus to sole, resulting in a full leg withdrawal and flaring of the toes. Several months later, I was told that he recovered the ability to grasp objects with his lefthand.

    Before surgery, he had no sweating at all. As pointed out above, he apparently had no movement or sensation in any of his four limbs but he was able to see and understand verbal commands. After the surgery, there was evidence that he had reduced spasticity and I thought that he may have had some right hand movement. This reportedly improved by three months after injury so that he could grasp on his left hand on command.

    This above case is the closest that I have seen of survival from a near-decapitation. This man had a knife cut of 3 of the four blood vessels to his head. Because of the loss of blood flow, he lost half of his brain. The knife also cut three quarters of this spinal cord. By the way, the knife must have been remarkably sharp and the person wielding knife must have been very strong. The person who was cut has the strongest will to survive of anybody that I have ever seen.

    The person had only one blood vessels sustaining his brain... his right vertebral artery. This should have provided some blood supply through his basilar artery to his Circle of Willis and kept his brain stem, midbrain, thalamus, and right hemisphere alive. Even though his left hemisphere was infarcted and he probably had a right visual field cut, his eyes clearly followed me as I faced him, placed my fingers into each of his hand, and asked him to squeeze. He understood and really tried, grimacing. Note that his right facial expression was limited and he likely had a right hemiplegia from his left hemispheric infarct.

    Wise.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    SW Missouri
    Posts
    829
    I know SuzieQ sorta beat me to it, but I couldn't help but think of the vast number of 'head' transplant candidates from both sides of the aisle and both shores of the Atlantic, and that post a few days ago about a bunch of surgeons at a bar

    Maybe instead of lab animals, we need a few good politicians to sacrifice themselves for the greater good of the people

    Tom

  7. #7

    No comments!?!?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    By the way, there is no such term as "internal decapitation". I think that the reporter made it up. I have been in the field a long long time and have never heard this term published, used, or attributed in any way before this article. The claim that this woman's head nearly separated from the body without all the uscles and blood vessels of the neck tearing is simply not credible.

    I have actually seen an actual case of almost complete decapitation. This was a Chinese general who had been mistakenly attacked by a soldier with a sharp knife. The man approached the general from behind, reached with the right arm over the general's right shoulder across to the left side of the neck and cut from left to right. He severed both carotid arteris (located in deep in the neck about 3 cm), the left vertebral artery (located next to the spine), and cut three-quarters of the C3/4 spinal cord, leaving on the right lateral column (if my memory serves me correctly).

    Because three of four of the blood vessels to the brain were cut and could not be saved, this man had an infarct of his left hemisphere. Miraculously, his right hemisphere survived and, when I examined him, his eyes were able to follow me and he was able to hear my verbal commands. His body was paralyzed and quite spastic. He was unable to move any of the limbs on command although, from his facial expression, it was clear that he understood and wanted to try. Because he damaged his left (dominant) hemisphere, he could not speak but was able to make sounds. He was quite spastic in both arms and legs. When I tried to bend his arm, the arm resisted the movement with extensor rigidity. He had strong postiive Babinsky responses. It was unclear whether he could feel but he definitely did not squeeze my fingers when I put them on his left and right hands. I was hopeful that he might have some ability to squeeze his right hand because he still had an intact right lateral column, even though his left hemisphere was severely damaged.

    Dr. Hongyun Huang tranplanted olfactory ensheathing glia into his spinal cord, above and below the injury site. The day after surgery, he was sweating on on his back (a common occurrence). I couldn't be sure but he seemed to have less spasticity. On the second day after surgery, his spasticity is definitely less, particularly in his left arm. He no longer had extensor rigidity although he had hyper-reflexia. His Babinsky reflex was also subdued, occurring only with fairly strong scratching stimulus to sole, resulting in a full leg withdrawal and flaring of the toes. Several months later, I was told that he recovered the ability to grasp objects with his lefthand.

    Before surgery, he had no sweating at all. As pointed out above, he apparently had no movement or sensation in any of his four limbs but he was able to see and understand verbal commands. After the surgery, there was evidence that he had reduced spasticity and I thought that he may have had some right hand movement. This reportedly improved by three months after injury so that he could grasp on his left hand on command.

    This above case is the closest that I have seen of survival from a near-decapitation. This man had a knife cut of 3 of the four blood vessels to his head. Because of the loss of blood flow, he lost half of his brain. The knife also cut three quarters of this spinal cord. By the way, the knife must have been remarkably sharp and the person wielding knife must have been very strong. The person who was cut has the strongest will to survive of anybody that I have ever seen.

    The person had only one blood vessels sustaining his brain... his right vertebral artery. This should have provided some blood supply through his basilar artery to his Circle of Willis and kept his brain stem, midbrain, thalamus, and right hemisphere alive. Even though his left hemisphere was infarcted and he probably had a right visual field cut, his eyes clearly followed me as I faced him, placed my fingers into each of his hand, and asked him to squeeze. He understood and really tried, grimacing. Note that his right facial expression was limited and he likely had a right hemiplegia from his left hemispheric infarct.

    Wise.
    Dr. Young, I find this both fascinating and chilling. I am humbled, you have great strength. Thank you, it is good for one to have someone to hold in high regard.

    Matt

  8. #8
    Senior Member Kratos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Lat:+46,034635 Long:+16,619310 Croatia
    Posts
    782
    is the general still alive or?

  9. #9

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivica Rod
    is the general still alive or?
    I forgot to ask that. How about it Wise, did the general survive?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Rollin Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    B ville, New York, USA
    Posts
    826
    WOW!! What a story Dr. Young.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-13-2006, 09:55 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-04-2003, 05:30 PM
  3. Link between Head Injury and Parkinson's Disease
    By Max in forum Health & Science News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-20-2003, 04:03 PM
  4. Treating head injuries
    By Max in forum Brain Injury & Stroke Research
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-02-2002, 04:07 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-18-2002, 02:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •