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Thread: Scientific Breakthrough or Scam?

  1. #1

    Scientific Breakthrough or Scam?

    Scientific Breakthrough or Scam?

    Doctor Claims He's Saving Lives

    By David Ono

    May 7, 2007 (KABC-TV) - Scientific breakthrough? Or stem cell scam?

    A Malibu doctor claims to be saving lives with a treatment the FDA says is illegal in the United States.

    Dr. William Rader gets around the stem cell ban by sending patients to his clinic in the Dominican Republic.

    A psychiatrist by training, Dr. Rader, gets the stem cells in Eastern Europe, from fetuses aborted between eight and 12 weeks. He charges $25,000 for the first injection.

    Dr. Rader may be a familiar face if you're a longtime viewer of Eyewitness News. He worked here as an on-air psychiatrist for more than a decade, beginning in the late '70s.

    Now, he runs Medra, Inc out of his Malibu home, and says his stem cell injections are helping patients with a long list of diseases from Alzheimer's to AIDS, diabetes, epilepsy, even cancer.

    "There's no one else in the world who knows what I know ... I'm the only one doing this! One mind!" Dr. Rader said.

    Dr. William Rader claims to be years, if not decades, ahead of every other scientist in the United States.

    "All of the researchers are using the wrong cells ... and in this country, they're up to mice," Dr. Rader said.

    Rader says he's treated more than 1,000 human patients with fetal stem cells, many of them children, like Clayton Fatheree.

    From the moment Clayton came into the world, he appeared to be a perfect baby.

    But the smiling, happy, bundle of joy soon disappeared.

    "His body was shaking, his eyes were rolling back ... he was having over 100 seizures a day," Azita Fatheree, Clayton's mother, said.

    Seizures that were at one point, non-stop and around-the-clock.

    "Literally up all night. Just begging and negotiating with God to give your child five or 10 minutes of uninterrupted sleep," George Fatheree, Clayton's father, said.

    more:

    http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?se...cal&id=5283114

  2. #2
    Senior Member Kratos's Avatar
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    scam. poeple like dr.rader should be in jail.

  3. #3
    The video on that link is extremely compelling. The change and improvement that child goes through is remarkable.





    I spoke with Dr. Rader about a year after my injury for about an hour and a half, when I was in a higher state of desperation, scouring the planet for an answer and cure, and found him to be very open and available to any questions and insecurities I had about what he does. But the end result of him still believing I could receive benefit from an injection into my bloodstream for an injury that entailed nerves being separated and still disconnected from the spinal cord, gave no believable answers, so I lost any trust and opted out.

    Strange thing is I found out about him from one of my best friends girlfriends, who is his Dr Rader's secretary, and I completely trust her (at least I trust that she would never lie or fabricate anything about what she has seen or witnessed). She claimed to see children come in and out of treatments with amazing and real improvements from all types of different disorders. She said she would stake her life on the benefits Dr Rader's patients were receiving.

    I believe there may be something there for some types of disease or injury, but if there is, it's a complete crap shoot. I am curious how the future will look back at this.

    Christopher

  4. #4
    From the second video:

    "I'm being hesitant, but I'm going to tell you that I can cure AIDS. That I've developed a special cell to cure AIDS and I've used it on AIDS patients, and it works. Now either I am psychotic, a compulsive liar, or I'm telling the truth." (Source)
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  5. #5
    Thanks Steven,
    I didn't see that second video underneath the video viewer. I was wondering where the mention of his "cure" for AIDS was that the first video had stated.






    Dr. Rader had also told me about his stem cell treatment that had cured AIDS in one of his patients, I guess about 3 years ago. He also claimed to be working on a stem cell therapy for hair loss/balding. I told him if he could get that out into production, then he'd have enough funding to cure any disease he wanted.

    I think what ever the reality is... he believes in what he is doing. Obviously some of his patients do as well. He came across, to me, as a bit of a well meaning, but victim oriented conspiracy theorist. Which may be understandable if everyone is calling him a fraud and that he's leaching off the desperate and diseased, when he believes he's onto a cure for the "incurable". I'm not going to judge him till it has been proven that nothing he does works, and he knows that. Being in the presence of a charlatan is a frightening thing, especially if you don't know it. I hope his therapies are proven true, because it is just too ugly to imagine the opposite.


    Chris

  6. #6
    kickingber
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    Is This The Dr. who fixed Ricci Kilgore?

  7. #7
    dr young, what do you know of the treatments offered by medra? good or bad.

    why can drs not share info as there is many clinics around the world offering treatments?

    dr young, have you seen the ricci kilgore video and do you have any comment?

    if dr rader has/knows something about a treatment that works, that others not doing, why is it not shared?

    thanks for any input dr young.

  8. #8
    kickingber, this is the doctor who treated Ricci.

    Doug, from an earlier post:

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    In my opinion, companies like Medra are taking advantage of people. I thought that IRM in Barbados was similar but met their CEO recently and was at least partly reassured that IRM is interested in having a legitimate clinical trial. I have seen no evidence that Medra is interested in doing so. If you go to the Medra web site, you will find that they are promising miraculous improvements literally dozens of conditions. By the way, if you go to the IRM web site, you will find the same story, unsubstantiated claims that their cells are curing many diseases.

    There is no reason at all to believe that Medra has anything to offer that would be beneficial for spinal cord injury. Some of the links in my previous post details out some of the story. I know a number of people who have gone and wasted their time and money, treating themselves or their kids with so-called stem cells. I doubt if there is anybody affiliated with the company who knows anything about spinal cord injury. So, any claim of recovery is suspect. In short, I think that Medra is a scam that is taking advantage of desperate people.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by cljanney
    I think what ever the reality is... he believes in what he is doing. Obviously some of his patients do as well. He came across, to me, as a bit of a well meaning, but victim oriented conspiracy theorist. Which may be understandable if everyone is calling him a fraud and that he's leaching off the desperate and diseased, when he believes he's onto a cure for the "incurable". I'm not going to judge him till it has been proven that nothing he does works, and he knows that. Being in the presence of a charlatan is a frightening thing, especially if you don't know it. I hope his therapies are proven true, because it is just too ugly to imagine the opposite.


    Chris
    I can respect your opinion....

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    I see similarities with this man
    José Arigó (1918-1971) http://www.answers.com/topic/jos-arig
    Pseudonym of José Pedro de Freitas, a Brazilian psychic healer who performed surgical operations without proper instruments or anesthetics. Arigó, who claimed to be directed by the spirit of "Dr. Adolpho Fritz," performed complex operations at top speed with an unsterilized pocket knife. In 1957 he was sentenced to imprisonment for illegally practicing medicine but was pardoned by the president of Brazil. He was again sentenced in 1964, with an additional charge of practicing "witchcraft" (presumably to account for his uncanny successes), but the case was reviewed the following year and Arigó was released before serving his complete sentence. He was killed in a road accident six years later.
    faith healing may or may not work but it needs to be called what it is IMO.

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