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Thread: MRI Results 20%

  1. #1
    Senior Member FasterNow's Avatar
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    MRI Results 20%

    I went for an MRI this week and the neurosurgeon estimates I have 20% diameter of my spinal cord at the injury site. Anybody else out there that has had an MRI post injury? I am wondering if there is anyone out there that has seen any changes in the spinal cord over time. The Dr. indicated to me that the tissue I was seeing surrounding the remaining cord at the site of injury was the result of tissue necrosis but I am wondering what it is exactly. Is it 'scar tissue' or is it 'dead tissue' or possible surrounding tissue which is swollen?
    Injured 7-22-06, T-11 T-12 complete. [Holds up cardboard sign] "Will work for returns."
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  2. #2
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    I have almost no cord left between C-4 and C-6.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  3. #3
    Hi,

    Loss of spinal cord is common long term after SCI due to cell death(tissue necrosis) and atrophy and most people have these changes noted progressively on MRI if done in the later stages of sCI.


    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...t=79095&page=3
    You may be interested in this link of new research being done.

    AAD

  4. #4
    Senior Member FasterNow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alan
    I have almost no cord left between C-4 and C-6.
    Thanks for the reply Alan. Is this any different than at a time closer to your injury date?
    Injured 7-22-06, T-11 T-12 complete. [Holds up cardboard sign] "Will work for returns."
    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
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  5. #5
    Senior Member FasterNow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse
    Hi,

    Loss of spinal cord is common long term after SCI due to cell death(tissue necrosis) and atrophy and most people have these changes noted progressively on MRI if done in the later stages of sCI.


    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...t=79095&page=3
    You may be interested in this link of new research being done.

    AAD
    I'm not sure if the link is correct...were you steering me toward a discussion of cholesterol treatment?

    If loss of spinal cord is common long term after SCI it seems that there should be some causes we could atribute to it. This is the first I've heard of atrophy of the spinal cord.

    What I can't wrap my head around is the structure of the spinal cord and why you would see a small segment (lengthwise) which appears constricted, and is said to be surrounded by an area of dead tissue, yet the areas below show up as healthy. Wouldn't the portion of the nerve cell below the area of injury, which I imagine as axon and dendrite portions, die rather quickly? I probably don't have a clear picture of the structure of the neurons through the length of the spinal cord.

    What I'm interested in hearing is whether people who experience returns over a period of time, of say three years, show any positive changes in the spinal cord at and below the area of injury. I'd also like to know whether people who do not experience returns, or even loss, show negative changes in the spinal cord.
    Injured 7-22-06, T-11 T-12 complete. [Holds up cardboard sign] "Will work for returns."
    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

  6. #6
    Sorry to confuse you. I meant that in chronic SCI, the MRI will show narrowing of parts of the spinal cord due to atrophy. I am not an expert on this but Dr Young addresses your questions in this post:

    sci.rutgers.edu/index.php?page=viewarticle&afile=10_January_2002@SpinalAtrophy.html

    AAD

  7. #7
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FasterNow
    Thanks for the reply Alan. Is this any different than at a time closer to your injury date?
    Close to my injury, they hadn't invented MRI yet, or weren't using them on people (this was June, 1981.) I had my first MRI in 1985, and it showed nothing because the wires from my fusion interefered with the scan. While I had a laminectomy of C-5 to look if a syrinx caused my pains (no syrinx was found), the wires were also removed. In 1987, I had my first wireless MRI, and it showed the lack of cord from C-4 to C-6, and that apparently has not changed over the years, according to reports on subesequent scans.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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