Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Nanotechnology/Dr. Stupp

  1. #1
    Senior Member spidergirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hollywood, CA
    Posts
    1,049

    Nanotechnology/Dr. Stupp

    Dr. Stupp is collaborating with Dr. Kessler ( he has been talked about here ) ....I know his daughter is injured in Chicago but this still seems like for acutes.

    Collaboration and technology is the key like I have always said. I don't forsee anything straight biologically at all.






    Project On Emerging Nanotechnologies: 4/24/2007 - Nanotechnology Offers Hope for Treating Spinal Cord Injuries, Diabetes, Hea...







    4/24/2007 - Nanotechnology Offers Hope for Treating Spinal Cord Injuries, Diabetes, Heart and Parkinson's Disease


    Science of tomorrow promises to alleviate suffering from intractable ailments of today


    • View Dr. Stupp’s powerpoint


    WASHINGTON, DC – Imagine a world where damaged organs in your body—kidneys, liver, heart—can be stimulated to heal themselves. Envision people tragically paralyzed whose injured spinal cords can be repaired. Think about individuals suffering from the debilitating effects of Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s relieved of their symptoms – completely and permanently.
    Dr. Samuel I. Stupp, director of the Institute of BioNanotechnology in Medicine at Northwestern University, is one of a new breed of scientists combining nanotechnology and biology to enable the body to heal itself—and who are achieving amazing early results. Dr. Stupp’s work suggests that nanotechnology can be used to mobilize the body’s own healing abilities to repair or regenerate damaged cells.
    In a dramatic demonstration of what nanotechnology might achieve in regenerative medicine, paralyzed lab mice with spinal cord injuries have regained the ability to walk using their hind limbs six weeks after a simple injection of a purpose-designed nanomaterial.
    A video of Dr. Stupp discussing his groundbreaking research with collaborator John Kessler is available hereQuicktime required to view
    “By injecting molecules that were designed to self-assemble into nanostructures in the spinal tissue, we have been able to rescue and regrow rapidly damaged neurons,” said Dr. Stupp at an April 23 session hosted by the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. “The nanofibers – thousands of times thinner than a human hair – are the key to not only preventing the formation of harmful scar tissue which inhibits spinal cord healing, but to stimulating the body into regenerating lost or damaged cells.”
    Stupp’s work hinges on a fundamental area of nanotechnology – self-assembly – that someday should enable medical researchers to tailor and deliver individualized patient treatments in previously unimaginable ways. Stupp and his coworkers designed molecules with the capacity to self-assemble into nanofibers once injected into the body with a syringe. When the nanofibers form they can be immobilized in an area of tissue where it is necessary to activate some biological process, for example saving damaged cells or regenerating needed differentiated cells from stem cells.
    This same work also has implications for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, both diseases in which key brain cells stop working properly.
    During his presentation, Dr. Stupp allowed a rare glimpse into ongoing research with collaborators in Mexico and Canada, showing the impressive visual of mice recovering from the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease after being exposed to the bioactive nanostructures developed in Stupp’s laboratory at Northwestern University. Stupp also showed another nanotechnology achievement in joint work with Jon Lomasney at Northwestern demonstrating the use of nanostructures and proteins to achieve recovery of heart function after an infarction.
    “This research provides an early glimpse into the new and exciting places where nanotechnology can take us,” said Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies Director David Rejeski at the session, which also served as the release of the new report NanoFrontiers: Visions for the Future of Nanotechnology. “This type of work helps us to see beyond first generation, ‘gee-whiz’ nanotech applications like better tennis racquets or anti-static fabrics, and reach for an end to human suffering from Parkinson’s, heart disease, and even cancer.”
    Last edited by spidergirl; 05-01-2007 at 03:30 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Murrieta, Ca.
    Posts
    424

    nano tech

    Spidergirl, good find. I finally to the time to let the presentation down load, it took quite a while.
    It looks like this technology might solve alot of the issues with repair of the spinal cord by regeneration. It seems to resolve the scar issue in chronics injury also.

    Any comments Dr. Young?

  3. #3
    Senior Member spidergirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hollywood, CA
    Posts
    1,049
    Quote Originally Posted by rjames
    Spidergirl, good find. I finally to the time to let the presentation down load, it took quite a while.
    It looks like this technology might solve alot of the issues with repair of the spinal cord by regeneration. It seems to resolve the scar issue in chronics injury also.

    Any comments Dr. Young?
    It does and it doesn't. I still see the scar being a huge hurdle. However, I think that combining technology will eventually play a huge factor in the repair of the spinal cord. We also mustn't underestimate that while some may think reversing paralysis may not happen in our lifetime, technological advances can and do skyrocket in this country. These advances may one day greatly improve some of our quality of life and may even one day enable us to walk in some format.

  4. #4
    Senior Member artsyguy1954's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    1,831
    Quote Originally Posted by spidergirl
    It does and it doesn't. I still see the scar being a huge hurdle. However, I think that combining technology will eventually play a huge factor in the repair of the spinal cord. We also mustn't underestimate that while some may think reversing paralysis may not happen in our lifetime, technological advances can and do skyrocket in this country. These advances may one day greatly improve some of our quality of life and may even one day enable us to walk in some format.
    I agree.
    Step up, stand up for:
    http://www.stepnow.org

    'He not busy being born is busy dying." <Bob Dylan>

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •