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Thread: Bone marrow stromal cells can achieve cure of chronic paraplegic rats: functional and

  1. #1
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    Bone marrow stromal cells can achieve cure of chronic paraplegic rats: functional and

    This has received no press coverage.

    Chronic paraplegia resulting from severe spinal cord injury (SCI) is considered to be an irreversible condition. Nevertheless, recent studies utilizing adult stem cells appear to offer promise in the treatment of this and other neurological diseases. Here, we show that progressive functional motor recovery is achieved over the course of the year following the administration of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in traumatic central spinal cord cavities of adult rats with chronic paraplegia. . . .

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...677&query_hl=2

  2. #2

    for the cell4health ppl

    i would like to get the complete full text to know the dr. k's opinion

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    Senior Member cypresss's Avatar
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    very promising

    i'm also interested about full version of article

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    Senior Member Jeff B's Avatar
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    Legally a whole article can't be reproduced here but here are the main quotes that you would be scanning for anyway: (anything not in italics are my comments)

    "All rats were paraplegic after injury, with no signs of functional

    recovery. Three months later, total paraplegia was maintained." (so they were chronic)

    "While the animals with intralesional administration
    of saline alone remained completely paraplegic throughout
    the entire study, the animals subjected to intralesional injection
    ...
    showed an evident and progressive recovery
    from their paraplegia, starting a few weeks after this procedure." (so the treatment appeared to have a definate positive effect)

    "Ten months after treatment, the treated rats had a mean score
    (
    ±standard deviation) on the BBB scale of 17.1±1.1 (the maximum
    score in this scale, corresponding to an animal without
    motor deficits, is 21)." (The control rats BBB score was 0.
    This experiment was also repeated with similar results)

    The authors also found that treated rats had very little fibrous tissue at the injury site at one year while control rats did. So any "scar" that was there seemed to not impede the growth of new tissue.

    They concluded that bone marrow stromal cells transplanted into chronic rats
    promoted clear functional recovery, starting within a few weeks of transplant and increasing to about 1 year. The new tissue filled the cord cavity "permitting the passage of descending and ascending neurons."

    Here is how they conclude: "Keeping in mind that BMSC offer the
    possibility of autograft transplantation therapy, it is obvious that
    this experimental treatment should be considered for clinical
    application in paraplegic patients."

    This sounds very promising to me. I hope that these
    Madrid, Spain based researchers can keep getting funding.



    Last edited by Jeff B; 04-27-2007 at 04:06 PM.

  5. #5

    agreed

    thank you for you posting and this can read by the researchers that they using bone marrow stem cell

  6. #6

  7. #7
    Senior Member Jeff B's Avatar
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    Hmmm, let's hope this thread does not turn into off topic rants like the other. I was wondering how a 2006 article didn't get noticed before. I hope these researchers are on the right path and that the questions asked by Dr. Young are answerable.

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