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Thread: daily cathing much worse long term than indwelling foley (logically so?!)

  1. #31
    opps
    Last edited by FLAX; 04-08-2014 at 01:23 AM.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by kenneth_lee View Post
    From all the reading i can get my hands on, and myself being on a foley now for 4 and 1/2 years, all indications are that sticking a cath in and out in and out ...........etc etc of the urethra is a BAD idea, causing strictures, scaring, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    If you choose to use an indwelling catheter, I would at least urge you to get tested for possible bladder cancer starting at 5 years of use (urine cytologies X3 annually) and then with bladder biopsies annually with cystoscopy after 10 years.

    Studies show that long term indwelling catheters use in people with SCI increases your risk for bladder cancer significantly after 10 years...any I have lost a number of young patients from this. The type of cancer is more commonly squamous cell or adenocarcinoma, which is not easy to treat with chemo or radiation, unlike the bladder cancer that ABs usually get (transititional cell). Caught early, drastic surgery can be life saving, but if it is too late this cancer is nearly always fatal.

    Also studies with people with SCI have shown that indwelling catheter use has a much higher association with stones, long term kidney deterioration, and loss of fertility (for men).

    Choose what you want to use for bladder management, but do it with accurate information about the relative risks and benefits.

    (KLD)
    COULD YOU SOURCE THESE STUDIES .


    Im ic 3-4x day and will see my urologist asap for possible urethral trauma.
    quads may risk urethral trauma because of limited dexterity and the ability or lack thereof to feel the pressure/resistance at the bladder neck/sphincter WHEN IC'ING 3X A DAY.


    Respectfully,

    F
    Last edited by FLAX; 04-10-2014 at 05:49 PM.

  3. #33
    My urologist was definitely against the daily/regular and/or long term use of a foley as opposed to IC. However he had no problem with overnight use of an indwelling catheter (no balloon). PSA tests were ordered. The urologist stated that the constant bumping of the inflatable balloon increased chances of (SOME LONG WORD) kidney failure over long term. His permission of overnight use of indwelling cath was based on my own circumstances of increased bhp symptoms.

  4. #34
    IC is always better than a foley. You decrease the risks of infections, your bladder doesent shrink over the time, you minimize the risk of cancer .... and I wouldnt feel well as a person who has 24/7 a tube in my weenie!!

  5. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    175
    For what it?s worth: I first started with intermittent catheterization (IC) but I was frustrated with the process. Having to carry around the equipment, finding a suitable bathroom. Having to time everything, not to mention the problems at night. And after all of this I still would have accidents, even after carefully timing when I drank. I also got some UTI?s, about five or six in two years. I think I had one course of antibiotics ever. I can't help but think that over indulgence in antibiotics makes them less effective when you really need them. When I did get a UTI I increased the amount of water I drank to "flush" my bladder out. That usually solved the problem. (Full disclosure: I'm something of a pharmacaphobe so I dislike taking meds of any sort.)

    I then switched to a foley about twelve years ago and used them for the next ten years. I couldn't have been happier. I had one UTI in all of that time. I changed the catheter every month.

    I also use the "belly bag". I like it very much. It sits over the abdomen at approximately the same location as the bladder. A real plus for me is that it is very easy to empty from a chair. All I have to do is unclip the strap and position the drainage port over the toilet and empty it. I can wear shorts without having to worry about displaying anything. I don't worry about when or how much I drink.

    I get yearly checkups with my urologist and I routinely get a clean bill of health. I had no problems with urethral tearing because I kept my penis pointing straight up. This reduced the number of bends in the catheter as well. When I mentioned the possibility of cancer the urologist suggested that a predisposition to cancer in general, such as a family history of cancer, smoking, etc. were more important. The continued use of a catheter might exacerbate the problem. Annual check ups are also important.

    I switched to a sp catheter a couple of years ago and I have had similar success with it even though I'm not particularly gentle. I've had chairs sit on my sp tube during transfers into and out of my car, had clothes rub on it, etc., and I've never had a problem. Of course, I have no feeling down there so that might explain a lot.

    It quietly goes about its business. I check it every so often to see if I need to empty the bag. That's it. For me it's the simplest way to deal with my bladder issues.
    Last edited by StarLord; 04-11-2014 at 02:46 AM.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by StarLord View Post
    For what it?s worth: I first started with intermittent catheterization (IC) but I was frustrated with the process. Having to carry around the equipment, finding a suitable bathroom. Having to time everything, not to mention the problems at night. And after all of this I still would have accidents, even after carefully timing when I drank. I also got some UTI?s, about five or six in two years. I think I had one course of antibiotics ever. I can't help but think that over indulgence in antibiotics makes them less effective when you really need them. When I did get a UTI I increased the amount of water I drank to "flush" my bladder out. That usually solved the problem. (Full disclosure: I'm something of a pharmacaphobe so I dislike taking meds of any sort.)

    I then switched to a foley about twelve years ago and used them for the next ten years. I couldn't have been happier. I had one UTI in all of that time. I changed the catheter every month.

    I also use the "belly bag". I like it very much. It sits over the abdomen at approximately the same location as the bladder. A real plus for me is that it is very easy to empty from a chair. All I have to do is unclip the strap and position the drainage port over the toilet and empty it. I can wear shorts without having to worry about displaying anything. I don't worry about when or how much I drink.

    I get yearly checkups with my urologist and I routinely get a clean bill of health. I had no problems with urethral tearing because I kept my penis pointing straight up. This reduced the number of bends in the catheter as well. When I mentioned the possibility of cancer the urologist suggested that a predisposition to cancer in general, such as a family history of cancer, smoking, etc. were more important. The continued use of a catheter might exacerbate the problem. Annual check ups are also important.

    I switched to a sp catheter a couple of years ago and I have had similar success with it even though I'm not particularly gentle. I've had chairs sit on my sp tube during transfers into and out of my car, had clothes rub on it, etc., and I've never had a problem. Of course, I have no feeling down there so that might explain a lot.

    It quietly goes about its business. I check it every so often to see if I need to empty the bag. That's it. For me it's the simplest way to deal with my bladder issues.
    StarLord and I had suprapubic catheters placed on the same day, just about 4 years ago, wasn't it (Time flies). Glad to see you here on Care Cure and to hear you are doing well and the suprapubic is working so well for you. I'm doing great with mine too, as often said, just wish I had done it earlier!

    All the best,
    GJ

  7. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    175
    Hey GJ, thanks for the sentiment. Yeah, it's been that long. It's almost scary. I'm happy to hear everything is going well for you as well. Every now and again we deserve a break. As a great man once said: All the best.

    StarLord

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