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Thread: Snow Job on the New Jersey ESCR bill?

  1. #1
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    Angry Snow Job on the New Jersey ESCR bill?

    I do think all of us need to be concerned that what started as legislation for state funding of embryonic stem cell research in New Jersey, because it is neglected by the NIH, is now being used primarily for adult stem cell research.

    It makes one wonder how all this could have happened,......

    According to Seneca, the author of the New Jersey bill is Dr. Young, who himself is an adult stem cell researcher.

    Though Dr. Young may have testified in favor of ESCR, this bill ended up being an ESCR bill in name only. I guess the media as well as the public were fooled, and those waiting on cures were hurt.

    "There’s far too much unthinking respect given to authority,” Molly Ivins explained; “What you need is sustained outrage.”
    Kerr, Keirstead, McDonald, Stice and Jun Yan courageously work on ESCR to Cure SCI.

    Divisiveness comes from not following Christopher Reeve's ESCR lead.
    Young does ASCR.
    [I]I do not tear down CRPA, I ONLY make peopl

  2. #2
    Faye, what are you saying here? I don't understand the history and politicking involved. On a state level, NJ seems committed toward the funding of stem cell research (including ESCR) since 2005.
    Daniel

  3. #3
    Faye, are you working for NJ's Right to Life group? They attack Wise as well for his part in the legislation. (Source)

    Wise fought to get additional money for ESC research into NJ through a bond referendum. (CAMR)

    CAMR has nothing bad to say about the NJ bill.

    Or maybe you're attacking a dead man?

    [Ira] Black said New Jersey's strategy will be different. It has a centralized institute, is seeking collaborations with researchers around the world rather than requiring them to work in New Jersey and will work on stem cells both from embryos and from adult bone marrow. (Source)
    Have you no shame?

    For the curious, the NJ's stem cell bill is here. More info can be found here.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  4. #4
    Steven, thanks for posting the links. It seems like the NJ stem cell bill permits research on human stem cells, embryonic and adult, as well as cadaveric fetal cells. Am I misunderstanding?
    Daniel

  5. #5
    Dan, you're not. The NJ stem cell bill just clarified what stem cell research could be done with state funds.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  6. #6
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    Token Funding for ESCR.......

    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc
    Faye, what are you saying here? I don't understand the history and politicking involved. On a state level, NJ seems committed toward the funding of stem cell research (including ESCR) since 2005.
    Dan, I think the facts are quite clear: the bill was supposed to be ALL about ESCR to begin with. That is what made people be so excited about it.

    Now we find out that the bulk is going to ASCR scientists for ASCR.
    It's an OUTRAGE in my book!


    Jersey allows stem cell use in research
    McGreevey says law encourages creation of lifesaving medicine
    Monday, January 05, 203
    BY MATTHEW J. DOWLING Star-Ledger Staff

    Flanked by patients suffering from neurological diseases and spinal cord injuries, Gov. James E. McGreevey signed legislation yesterday making New Jersey the second state in the nation to promote stem cell research.
    Christopher Reeve, who was paralyzed in 1995 during a horseback riding accident, called the new law "the proudest day" for his home state. He said stem cell research has shown the potential to lead to cures for diseases like diabetes, cancer, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

    "It opens one of the most promising lines of inquiry that research medicine has ever developed," Reeve told a crowd that overflowed the conference hall at the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in West Orange, where he underwent physical therapy. "Embryonic stem cells have the ability to become any tissue or cell type in the human body. The potential is absolutely unlimited."

    Reeve, who grew up in Princeton, had lobbied McGreevey and state legislators to permit the research, particularly experiments with embryonic stem cells. Anti-abortion activists oppose the research as "irresponsible" and "sinister," arguing it could lead to human cloning. New Jersey's Catholic bishops joined the opposition.

    "This law will result in a grisly human experimentation and organ harvesting," said Marie Tasy, director of public and legislative affairs for New Jersey Right to Life. "It is truly a dark day for New Jersey. They actually opened the door to human cloning."

    McGreevey said the legislation he signed specifically bans human cloning and makes it a crime punishable by up to 20 years in jail.
    "This legislation is about providing lifesaving medicine," McGreevey said. "We can bring hope to thousands of citizens all across the state of New Jersey. Today, we celebrate the possible."

    Reeve said stem cell research could lead to significant medical advances in the next two to five years that would silence critics.

    "Whenever something truly great is accomplished, its birth is always attended by controversy and antagonism and naysayers," Reeve said. "And then, years later, we look back and wonder what all the fuss was about. This kind of scientific inquiry should not be stopped."

    McGreevey said New Jersey's connections to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries as well as the state's universities and medical schools make for an ideal environment for stem cell research.
    "It will serve as a magnet to bring the scientists and the greatest minds into New Jersey to have the innovations take place here," said state Health and Senior Services Commissioner Clifton Lacy. "New Jersey will be at that forefront of scientific advancement for our country."

    Reeve said New Jersey's leadership has already prompted other states to step up efforts to approve similar legislation. He said a vote has been scheduled in the Illinois Legislature later this month, and New York and Massachusetts are also addressing stem cell research.

    The legislation passed the state Assembly last month by a single vote after a tense 45-minute debate. Assemblyman Rafael Fraguela (D-Hudson) was kicked out of the Republican Assembly caucus after he broke ranks to provide the deciding vote in favor of the bill.

    "This legislative gift is for those who want their suffering to end," said Assemblyman Neil Cohen (D-Union). "Let New Jersey gather the most accomplished scientific and research minds of the 21st century and embark upon an historic pathway to cures."

    Despite the strong opposition during the Assembly vote, the bill signing yesterday at Kessler was without protesters. Dozens of paralysis victims and those who suffer from neurological disorders were joined by their families in Kessler's conference hall to watch McGreevey sign the bill.

    Afterward, many of the patients posed for pictures with McGreevey and Reeve, including Watchung Hills Regional High School senior Carl Riccio, who was paralyzed in a wrestling accident in February. Riccio, 17, said he believes stem cell research holds the potential for him to walk again.
    "It gives us hope for a cure in New Jersey instead of looking to other countries that are way ahead of us," Riccio said. "Hopefully, we can catch up and speed up the research."
    Original article can be found here

    My Comment: No chance in Hell we will be catching up if the bulk of the funding is going to ASCR!!!!

    "There’s far too much unthinking respect given to authority,” Molly Ivins explained; “What you need is sustained outrage.”
    Kerr, Keirstead, McDonald, Stice and Jun Yan courageously work on ESCR to Cure SCI.

    Divisiveness comes from not following Christopher Reeve's ESCR lead.
    Young does ASCR.
    [I]I do not tear down CRPA, I ONLY make peopl

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Faye
    I do think all of us need to be concerned that what started as legislation for state funding of embryonic stem cell research in New Jersey, because it is neglected by the NIH, is now being used primarily for adult stem cell research.
    Wrong. It started out as legislation for state funding for stem cell research in general. The NJ bill is called the New Jersey Stem Cell Research Act. Just like the California Bill, which you support, this contains provisions for funding both ESC AND ASC.

    It makes one wonder how all this could have happened,......

    According to Seneca, the author of the New Jersey bill is Dr. Young,
    I said Wise was ONE of the authors of the bill. He was involved in writing ESC into the bill. If Wise wasn't interested in ESCR, why would he fight to get NJ to use state funds to fund ESCR?

    who himself is an adult stem cell researcher.
    As I pointed out in 2 posts in the other thread Faye, researchers who work at federally funded universities are not allowed to conduct research using human embryonic stem cells. Wise's lab hasn't conducted human ESCR because the federal government won't allow him to. Human ESCR isn't allowed to take place in any university that accepts federal money. Rutgers is a public university. The NJ bill seeks to put a law into place that would allow public universities to conduct ESCR using state funds. This bill is important because it would allow Wise and other university employed SCI researchers to work with ESC's legally and fund the research using state funds.



    Though Dr. Young may have testified in favor of ESCR, this bill ended up being an ESCR bill in name only. I guess the media as well as the public were fooled, and those waiting on cures were hurt.
    Nope. The bill definitely sets aside money for ESCR, it just contains provisions for other types of stem cell research too, just like the California Stem Cell Bill that you support.

    Fooled how? Every press release I have read has stated that the bill provides funding for all forms of stem cell research. As Steven pointed out, the bills provisions are publicly accessible.

    The Pro-Lifers opposed the NJ Bill BECAUSE of the ESCR component. If the bill was for ASC only, the Pro-Lifers and religious right wouldn't have opposed it.
    Last edited by antiquity; 03-06-2007 at 12:17 PM.

  8. #8
    It's a shame that there was so much publicity about NJ funding ESCR, whereas the text of the bill actually didn't specify how the funds were to be allocated and projects prioritized. A bunch of the money that was thought to be allocated for hESCR went to other permitted projects.
    Daniel

  9. #9
    Faye, read your own propaganda:

    Quote Originally Posted by Faye
    Reeve, who grew up in Princeton, had lobbied McGreevey and state legislators to permit the research, particularly experiments with embryonic stem cells.
    The bill did that. Future bills to provide funding (bond measures, cigarette taxes) haven't fared so well.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Faye
    Dan, I think the facts are quite clear: the bill was supposed to be ALL about ESCR to begin with. That is what made people be so excited about it.
    One of the press releases is below. The facts have always been clear.

    CR and others were/are excited about it because it was the first one of its kind to attempt to side step Bush's ban on federally funded ESCR. Christopher Reeve put his stamp of approval on the bill. He was fully aware of its language and had no problem with it.

    McGreevey Signs Landmark Stem Cell Research AcT

    Takes Groundbreaking Step Towards Fulfilling Commitment to Make NJ National Medical Research Leader



    (WEST ORANGE) -- Governor James E. McGreevey today signed into law S1909, the “Stem Cell Research” bill, making New Jersey the second state in the nation to legalize stem cell research. In signing this bill into law, the Governor takes a landmark step in fulfilling his commitment to make New Jersey the nation’s leader for medical research.



    “Two years ago we laid out a vision to make New Jersey a leader in medical research and medical care, to give hope to the hundreds of thousands of families across the state affected by chronic and life-threatening disease,” said McGreevey. “Today, as New Jersey becomes the second state in the nation to legalize groundbreaking stem cell research, we build on our strength in medical research, and for the first time offer real hope to the hundreds of thousands suffering from diabetes, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, ALS, cancer and spinal cord injuries.



    “Despite facing overwhelming opposition from many fronts along the way, today we celebrate a great day for families, for research, and for the hope that miracles may be just around the corner.”



    The Governor signed the bill into law at the renowned Kessler Rehabilitation Institute in West Orange, where he was joined by actor Christopher Reeve. Reeve, who has fought tirelessly for stem cell research since he was paralyzed in a horseback riding accident, pledged with McGreevey, in the Fall of 2002, to get this legislation passed. The bill’s legislative sponsors, doctors from the Kessler Institute, and families who have fought to make stem cell research a reality, also joined McGreevey.



    The bill:

    · Permits research involving the derivation and use of human embryonic stem cells, human embryonic germ cells and human adult stem cells from any source, including somatic cell nuclear transplantation.


    · Requires a review of issues related to this research by a nine-member institutional review board, which will advise the Governor and the Legislature.

    · Requires physicians treating a patient for infertility to provide patients with information to allow them to make an informed and voluntary choice regarding the use of human embryos following infertility treatment.

    · This legislation also prohibits a person from purchasing or selling, or deriving any financial gain or advantage through the use of embryonic or cadaveric fetal tissue for research purposes. However, such tissue can be donated. The law also punishes persons in violation of this law with a civil penalty of not more than $50,000 or imprisonment for a term of not more than five years, or both, for each such incident.



    “This law is one of the most significant laws ever passed in the State of New Jersey," said Democratic Senate President Richard J. Codey. "And with its passage, New Jersey finally gets to show the world exactly where we stand on stem cell research. We stand on the side of hope and on the side of cures for millions of people who are suffering in the world. Clearly that's the right side to be on, and I'm proud New Jersey's now on it."



    "Today, New Jersey takes a giant step towards victory in the worldwide war against disease and human suffering," said Senator Barbara Buono, D-Middlesex. "What a monumental holiday gift for us all--to be able to say that this law is truly going to make the world a better place."



    "Medically advanced research that could potentially discover cures for devastating and life-threatening illnesses is now a viable reality in New Jersey," said Assemblyman Neil Cohen, D-Union. "Our state will be national leader in cutting-edge medical technology and scientific research that will save lives."



    "New Jersey is seizing the opportunity to be at the forefront of stem cell research," said Assemblyman John McKeon, D-Essex. "This new law will eliminate existing significant impediments to this emerging biotechnology."



    "Scientific stem cell research would not only help develop innovative health care treatments, but it could unlock cures to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Multiple Sclerosis, cancer, diabetes, and other life-altering diseases," said Assemblyman Mims Hackett, D-Essex...."
    http://www.state.nj.us/cgi-bin/gover...ves.pl?id=1668

    The facts are as clear as day Faye. Stop distorting them.

    Where, in the article above, is it stated that this is an ESCR only bill? Please point it out.

    From day 1, this was never an ESCR only bill. Christopher Reeve knew that, McGreevy knew that and everyone involved knew that. The bill was opposed by Bush and the Pro-Life lobby BECAUSE it sought to fund ESCR as well. If it was an ASC only bill, it would not have been opposed.
    Last edited by antiquity; 03-06-2007 at 12:16 PM.

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