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Thread: Pressure gauge for Roho cushions?

  1. #21
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    Richard. Tanks for the link, to use some sort of a low pass filter to prevent false alarms would be requried regardless of the way to do it I think. If used some inductive as on the link or for that matter any electronic devices on a second thought I’m not to sure, your conductive idea might be better but not sure, not sure about the current leading switches either. Due to adding electronics to the cushions or inside it itself (well, if the system was a stand-alone kit several things could be used, and maybe that could be an option as well to further look into). But say if going for a pneumatic solution inside the cushion itself, this can be formed when making the cushion, in the cushion making process, no cost added other than a swift change to the machines making the cushions, no extra cost either added to the cushion itself due to this (rubber is chap). Like in the pan of the cushion those small signalling wires “read tubes” could then be a part of the pan of the cushion with just a few strategically placed small balloons made of the same forgiven material as the cushion itself when the cushion was molded (thus not hampering the meaning of the cushion to protect the butt), then the additional pressure within this monitoring system could give a signal converted from an pneumatic signal to an electronic signal used as pleased (through an P/I [pressure to electrical current] transmitter converter outside the cushion itself for example)?

    Ultrasonic as referred to in your link I can not comment, but maybe fiber optics also could be an option, this if so can be made very thin (micro) and cost efficient to achieve it through sensors from say horizontal sensors in the cushion pan to detect obstacles at any given height in the cushion could be done, could also be mounted in the side walls of the cushion fingers (cells) if required. But, I’m not to sure about this though, just given the couple of days thinking of it I more lean to a integrated molded pneumatic system as a part of the cushion, don’t know, but that could be a cheep way to do it since all the material was the same as the cushion just adding another part to the forming/molding drawings of the cushion. Say as it is now the cushion valve itself is a part of the cushion system, like it is to fill air into it; but, why not make a similar valve to connect the small balloons and the tiny incorporated tubes inside (bad word for those “balloon” sensors, but I think you know what I mean, a sealed system to monitor pressure changes) the small balloons if activated (bottomed out) the pressure has to go somewhere, and if then connected to tubes the same way molded to the pan this will give a signal to a converter that can transform it to what is wanted. Maybe? I don’t know, but I think there could be several options, also to make it cheap, which would be a factor. Looking forward to your responses in the link, because the problem is interesting and it seems that a couple there is taking it as an challenge, which are great in itself.

    MAC. I agree, if some can help out as for this an if it is a problem, it should be fixed if just a small addition could help out. I know folks with pressure soars, but I’m not to sure if the cushions in itself is the problem, but if one could find a cushion to be as friendly as possible much is achieved cause most are sitting on a cushion during the day.
    Last edited by Leif; 02-24-2007 at 07:35 PM.

  2. #22
    Mac,
    probably the most straight foward way would be to measure the air pressure inside the cushion mechanically. If your roho is like mine, it has a air filler stem that comes out of the corner. A short piece of rubber hose, a couple of compression clamps and a air pressure gauge (dial). I would imagine the loaded pressure (with a user on the cushion) would be no more than 4# at the dial( this is the variable you would need to verify * after getting your cushion set at the appropriate height). Once you verify your cushion user height and measure the pressure, a quick glance at the gauge would tell you when your cushion height is not optimum.

    * this number would obviously change depending on the weight of the user.

  3. #23
    Senior Member forestranger52's Avatar
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    I thought so also. But some of the people in the earlier threads seem to have a reason why its just not air pressure. They are pretty convincing, you should check them out.
    Thanks, MAC

  4. #24
    I resurrected this thread after coming across this. It is supposed monitor the pressure in a single chamber Roho and sound an alarm if the pressure becomes too low.



    It's called the i-Preesure and is sold by Liber-T MedTech, a Canadian company.
    Last edited by SCI_OTR; 09-18-2007 at 06:46 AM.

  5. #25
    http://www.i-pressure.com/

    Hey, that's pretty cool. I was just reading this thread awhile ago. Been using the 2 finger rule on a high float since I got hurt. Seems like a gauge would go hand in hand; the pressure for 2 fingers should be constant I would think.

    Do you think the VA would supply one of these for me??

  6. #26
    They don't have any prices on their site. I would want to see that, as well as clinical evaluations of this (effectiveness, reliability, etc.) before I would recommend it. The VA may purchase one, although getting them to purchase anything from a foreign company without a USA distributor may be difficult. UL and FDA approval are often criteria used for determining if a medical device will be funded through Prosthetics, but with a good justification (and perhaps an appeal of any denial through your PVA NSO) you just might get one funded.

    (KLD)

  7. #27
    Yes KLD, I see the obstacles now. Probably not something to go crazy over. Now if it had a built-in pump it may be more attractive.

  8. #28
    As I mentioned earlier in this thread, the pressure in the cushion will remain constant as the cushion deflates, and will go down only after one's rear has contacted the solid seat pan and is taking some weight (see post #9 for an explanation). So although a pressure switch such as that shown may indeed save one's butt (literally), it will not give you much of a warning, if any, and cannot replace the two finger method.
    - Richard

    p.s. - I haven't gotten to working on the sensor yet, too much else going on, but in principle it ought to work.

  9. #29
    Even though we pressure map all the time, the 2 finger rule is still the best technique for me. I've heard from sources close to the company that Roho is also looking into something similar. Maybe I'll find out more when I go to Medtrade in a couple of weeks.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by rfbdorf
    As I mentioned earlier in this thread, the pressure in the cushion will remain constant as the cushion deflates, and will go down only after one's rear has contacted the solid seat pan and is taking some weight (see post #9 for an explanation). So although a pressure switch such as that shown may indeed save one's butt (literally), it will not give you much of a warning, if any, and cannot replace the two finger method.
    - Richard

    p.s. - I haven't gotten to working on the sensor yet, too much else going on, but in principle it ought to work.
    Richard, I understand. An AF buddy of mine used to mess with me, asking if I thought the pressure in the tires on them huge jets is the same without the weight of the airplane. Like the pressure in a tire is the same without weight on it ? Now i feel stoopid... seems like another life that I was the brilliant young mechanic I once was... Adi is right, SCI sucks. Drive on!

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