Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Approval of Stem Cell Research

  1. #1

    Approval of Stem Cell Research

    Approval of Stem Cell Research

    Positive Support Needed Not to Fall Behind Other Nations

    The government decided Friday to allow the resumption of stem cell research which has been prohibited here since the eruption of the disgraceful Hwang Woo-suk scandal in 2005. It is welcomed, though belated, as a measure to pave the way for full-fledged resumption of the research that will offer promise in the development of medical treatments for a wide range of chronic diseases including Parkinson’s disease, spinal cord injuries and diabetes.
    Though shameful to recollect, we enthusiastically embraced almost unrestricted stem cell research, bringing about subsequent much-hailed breakthroughs. But, it was eventually revealed that Hwang, a pivotal figure in the research, and his team had fabricated data to fraudulently claim feats of producing patient-specific stem cells. Since then, stem cell research with cloned human embryos has been virtually forbidden.

    During our absence, a growing number of nations are gearing up their efforts for a tangible breakthrough in the research. Particularly, the effort by the United States is conspicuous. Despite restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, several states including California are raising their own funds for the research. In addition to that, a number of private research institutes in the U.S. are pushing ahead with research.

    However, the effectiveness of our recent approval remains to be seen since fresh human eggs will not be allowed in the experiment. The researchers will be allowed to use only “leftover” embryos from in vitro fertilization treatment that otherwise would be discarded. Some scientists here went so far as to say that experiments with leftover eggs are meaningless, claiming that permission for egg trades is needed to boost the research.

    But, opposition to the research from religious circles and women’s organizations still remains strong as is the case in the U.S. and other foreign countries. The egg restriction seems to be a nod to those opposing the research based on the belief that an embryo contains the potential to form a human or is actually a human, and therefore can’t be willfully destroyed to save another life.

    more:

    http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/opin...0333254040.htm

  2. #2
    Senior Member artsyguy1954's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    1,831
    Good to see South Korea "back in the race". We can't afford to loose the effort and money of a major industrial nation in the quest for a cure. I just hope they have learned their lesson. Cheating, lying and other forms of corruption may get you somewhere in politics, but not in the advancement of science.
    Step up, stand up for:
    http://www.stepnow.org

    'He not busy being born is busy dying." <Bob Dylan>

  3. #3

    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by artsyguy1954
    Good to see South Korea "back in the race". We can't afford to loose the effort and money of a major industrial nation in the quest for a cure. I just hope they have learned their lesson. Cheating, lying and other forms of corruption may get you somewhere in politics, but not in the advancement of science.

    You are so right artsyguy1954.
    manouli.

  4. #4
    Korean scientists claim to have cloned wolves

    SEOUL, March 26 (Yonhap) -- A South Korean research team claimed Monday it has created the world's first cloned wolves in October 2005, and that the animals have been growing up without any problems.

    The team, led by Lee Byeong-chun and Shin Nam-sik, veterinary professors at Seoul National University, said the two cloned female wolves, named Snuwolf and Snuwolffy, were born on Oct. 18 and Oct. 26, 2005.

    The breakthrough came three months after the team announced it succeeded in cloning three female dogs -- Bona, Peace and Hope. The team's lead scientist, Lee, was a key member of the team led by disgraced scientist Hwang Woo-suk, which produced the world's first cloned dog, Snuppy, a male, in April 2005.

    Both Hwang and Lee have been on trial in the scientific world following the discovery that their research papers on human stem cells were fabricated. Their works on dog cloning, however, were confirmed genuine and successful.

    more:

    http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/Engn...6171327E2.html

Similar Threads

  1. Where they stand: Talent, McCaskill on stem cell research
    By manouli in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-03-2006, 03:34 PM
  2. Advocacy, readers beware: Thinking through the SCREA
    By Steven Edwards in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: 07-21-2006, 08:44 PM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-27-2006, 01:25 AM
  4. Replies: 80
    Last Post: 03-22-2006, 05:25 PM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-07-2002, 09:44 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •