Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Guns in space

  1. #1
    Senior Member WheelieMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    1,454

    Guns in space

    Can a gun be fired in space? Why or why not?

    Mike

  2. #2
    Yes it can..
    but there are reasons why they aren't used.
    The rule of equal and opposite reaction would take place. The mass of the bullet would propel away, as the device used to discharge would also propel away - but in the opposite direction.

    You could use them, but the effect would be like a rocket blast, manuevering the discharging craft in the opposite direction, or if it's not centered causing it to spin.

    BB < --- > Gun


    (hope I didn't botch it up )
    Last edited by Rbrauer; 01-24-2007 at 03:25 PM.
    Rick Brauer or just call me - Mr B

    http://www.riseadventures.org

  3. #3
    Good question, I think you must be able to coz the the gunpowder is enclosed inside the shell and doesn't need oxygen to make it explode.
    But god knows what happens to the bullet in space, if it travels the same speed or if it just carries on until some kind of gravity off some planet sucks it in.
    I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past, so one way to get the most out of life is to look at it as an adventure.

  4. #4
    Senior Member WheelieMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    1,454
    I was leaning towards being able to. I would imagine a bullet would keep going until it hit something, or was pulled into a planets gravitational pull like Knightrider said.
    I came up with that question one night as my wife and I were going to bed. She wonders about be sometimes.

    Mike

  5. #5
    Pose her the question about no gravity once you reach outer space. Is it that your out of the gravitational pull of the planet? no.. actually your in a free fall state. You go so fast, but gravity keeps you close to the planet. Like swinging something on the end of a string. The string represents gravity. Once you let go or the string breaks the object goes flying off.
    Rick Brauer or just call me - Mr B

    http://www.riseadventures.org

  6. #6

    Smile

    Seems to me it would work since the bullet has the fuel plus the oxidizer and the hammer should still ignite it. I'm not sure that anyone would hear the bang. Couple of other problems - If you didn't hold onto a support you might go off in the opposite direction and the bullet would travel quite a bit further since there's almost nothing to slow it down. Once you fire the gun you might have to keep watching behind to be sure you didn't shoot yourself in the back of your head.
    Carl

  7. #7
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    near dracula castle
    Posts
    9,508
    What would happen if I shot a gun in space?


    Ah, an inquiry that warms the hearts of gun-toting physicists. The peacenik response might be...nothing. A gun cartridge holds the bullet or metal tip and the gunpowder (yup, they still use that stuff). The latter requires a spark, a nifty chemical reaction that involves oxygen, which tends to be sorely lacking in space. However, forward-thinking manufacturers have packed an oxidizer within the bullet casing. Whether that's sufficient for an explosive launch is up for much debate.

    That doesn't satisfy our bloodlust, does it? We'll assume we can send the bullet on its merry way with the proper gun. The scenario then conjures up the classic physics poser of shooting the monkey. Since we find shooting a cute primate abhorrent, we'll sub in the garden gnome.

    Where you're standing when you execute this maneuver, such as within a planet's gravitational pull, would affect the bullet's speed and path. As long as your aim is true, the bullet would travel a straight line (aka Newton's first law of motion) until some sort of force or object impedes it. Meanwhile, the recoil (Newton's third law) has pushed you back with an equal and opposite force.

    The next question is, can you fire off another shot? A regular old earth gun likely won't cotton to its new environment and may seize up, blow up, or do something equally annoying. Plus, we've littered space with enough dangerous debris already, do we really need to have bullets go flying?
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  8. #8
    Senior Member WheelieMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    1,454
    Adi
    At the risk of littering space with more junk, yes I think we need guns in space. What if one of our Buzz Armstrongs runs into Martin the Martian? Martin has his ray gun and Buzz just has space junk to throw at him, or a fellow astronaut to hide behind.

    Mike

  9. #9
    Okey what if one fires the gun paralell to the earths orbit around the sun and earths gravity don't have any effect on the bullet... Which one will get around the sun fastest? Earth or the bullett?

    PS. lets say that the bullet will travel in the same orbit as Tellus.



    Quote Originally Posted by knightrider
    Good question, I think you must be able to coz the the gunpowder is enclosed inside the shell and doesn't need oxygen to make it explode.
    But god knows what happens to the bullet in space, if it travels the same speed or if it just carries on until some kind of gravity off some planet sucks it in.
    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    Moe,

    I... don't care about what I think ... you should just ignore my posts.

    I don't understand ... words.

    Paolo

  10. #10
    Senior Member mr_coffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    6,030
    Okey what if one fires the gun paralell to the earths orbit around the sun and earths gravity don't have any effect on the bullet... Which one will get around the sun fastest? Earth or the bullett?
    If there is no gravity of the earth affecting the bullet or vice versa or friction in space, it all depends on the intial veloctiy of the earth and the bullet, whichever is intially faster will win, if they both start at 0 m/s then again it would all depend on their start velocity.

    The bullet has a much much smaller mass than the earth, so the gravitational pull from the sun to the earth is goign to be huge compared to the bullets.

    I havn't taken physics in awhile, but if the Force of gravity is stronger on the earth, I think it might accelerate faster around the orbit than the bullet but again I'm not sure if they are directly related or not.


    Because if you think about it, the earth has a much greater chance of running into debree that could cause friction and slowly slow the earth down, or a big f'ing metor coudl nail it and the bullet would win hah.

    v = (2*pi*R) / T,

    if you use this formula, T is the period, R is the distance from the object from the sun, so mass doesn't even come into play, in this case they would be equal.

    Well that was alot of rambling, I conclude that if they both start out at the same intial velocity, and there is no friction, they will both be equal in speed around the sun if you put treat the earth as a small point rather tahn taking into account how much bigger it is compared to the bullet.

    Becuase somthing this big ( ) compared to . of course the right side of the ) will hit the finish line before the .

    and here is a kitty:
    Injured:10-16-04
    C7/C8, T1 incomplete;


    For stalkers convenience:
    Blog:
    http://www.ordealsonwheels.com/
    Facebook:
    http://www.facebook.com/#!/coryssanchez
    Progress:
    http://photobucket.com/albums/b290/swooty/
    My drawings:
    http://kanvases.com/sites/corysanchez/home

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-12-2002, 10:19 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-24-2002, 10:25 AM
  3. Stem cells go into space
    By Wise Young in forum Life
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-12-2002, 05:17 PM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-21-2002, 10:04 AM
  5. Genes in Microgravity
    By Max in forum Cure
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-05-2001, 08:50 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •